Is my heart rate too high?

  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 1:41 AM GMT
    When I do intervals on the treadmill I check my heart rate after each sprint. It's been around 196-200 and then steadily drops to around 158 until I'm ready to do my next sprint. Someone commented and told me that that was way to high. I don't know much about heart rates. Is that bad?
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    Jan 05, 2010 1:59 AM GMT
    DrobUA saidWhen I do intervals on the treadmill I check my heart rate after each sprint. It's been around 196-200 and then steadily drops to around 158 until I'm ready to do my next sprint. Someone commented and told me that that was way to high. I don't know much about heart rates. Is that bad?


    According to the American Heart Association, 200bpm is 100%max for your age... That does seem a bit high to me...

    http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4736
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    Jan 05, 2010 2:06 AM GMT
    DrobUA saidWhen I do intervals on the treadmill I check my heart rate after each sprint. It's been around 196-200 and then steadily drops to around 158 until I'm ready to do my next sprint. Someone commented and told me that that was way to high. I don't know much about heart rates. Is that bad?


    Are you using an HRM, counting your pulse, or the treadmill? I was having similar results, so I bought an HRM from Timex. I'm still waiting for it. Got a lot of good advice from the guys on here.

    If you're heart rate is REALLY that high and not a measurement artifact, you may have too much sodium or caffeine in your diet. Is your heart rate staying elevated until you do something, like cough or sneeze?



  • CincyBOJ

    Posts: 306

    Jan 05, 2010 2:11 AM GMT
    Out of curiosity, what is your resting heart rate?
  • Glorfindel

    Posts: 277

    Jan 05, 2010 2:26 AM GMT
    If you're using the heart rate monitor on the treadmill, that could be the problem because those tend to be inaccurate.

    BUT... a 200 bpm is INCREDIBLY high. A post run rate of about 160 bpm is also very high. My heartrate tends to be about 150 when I'm doing runs. If it gets into the 160 range, I get uncomfortable and stop running. My post run rate drops down to the 100-110 within about a minute or two of running.

    You might want to look into getting a VO2 Max testing. It provides aerobic threshold, lactate threshold, VO2 max, and heart rate zones. I don't know if I'm allowed to post this here, but Fitness Werx (http://www.fitnesswerx.com/category.sc?categoryId=24) does those tests for a fee. It's a DC area company, but maybe there are other places near you. Maybe your zones are just higher or you have high blood pressure. But I'd have to say offhand, that the numbers you gave were on the very high side.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jan 05, 2010 2:50 AM GMT
    better yet... how do you 'feel' when your ding the interval? if you feel fine, keeping going. and don't listen to anyone else most of the time. had he not said that to you, you would of never of thought your HR was high in his opinion.

    way too many variables when using a HRM. go on how you feel! feel good,go....feel tried, go slow/easy or take a day off.
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 3:00 AM GMT
    CincyBOJ saidOut of curiosity, what is your resting heart rate?


    Around 126
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:03 AM GMT
    196-200 does seem really high. At my highest intervals I'm in the 180s.
    Even for short intervals, I have around 9 marathons, about 12 halfs, an olympic tri and a half ironman under my belt. It has been at more of them than I care to think that a 30 something guy who seems healthy drops dead from some sort of heart seizure.
    You could be an anomaly but the numbers alone are a bit of a red flag. Look into this more and figure out what's best for you.
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 3:03 AM GMT
    UStriathlete saidbetter yet... how do you 'feel' when your ding the interval? if you feel fine, keeping going. and don't listen to anyone else most of the time. had he not said that to you, you would of never of thought your HR was high in his opinion.

    way too many variables when using a HRM. go on how you feel! feel good,go....feel tried, go slow/easy or take a day off.


    I mean I feel tired and out of breath after but my heart feels fine. I'm ready to go again after about a min of walking. I do get light headed or nauseous sometimes if I haven't eaten enough that day but no major problems.
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:07 AM GMT
    DrobUA said
    CincyBOJ saidOut of curiosity, what is your resting heart rate?


    Around 126


    Seriously? 126 is way too high for a resting heart rate. What did you use to measure that?

    You should be below 84 for your resting heart rate!
  • Glorfindel

    Posts: 277

    Jan 05, 2010 3:09 AM GMT
    Something is off about the calculation then....

    normal healthy resting heart rates should be in the 60s. People in poor health have resting heart rates in the 80s. I don't think you're in poor health by the look of you. haha

    Something is wrong in how the measurement was taken or the calculation made.
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 3:20 AM GMT
    acoco15 said
    DrobUA said
    CincyBOJ saidOut of curiosity, what is your resting heart rate?


    Around 126


    Seriously? 126 is way too high for a resting heart rate. What did you use to measure that?

    You should be below 84 for your resting heart rate!


    haha well for that I just counted so it was probably me that messed that up. When I was running I just used the treadmill so I'll probably go buy a heart rate monitor and see what it says.
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 3:26 AM GMT
    ok I just re-tried the resting heart rate a couple times and got an average of 90.

    My method, correct me if I'm wrong.

    Find the pulse in your neck. Look at a stop watch for 10 sec. Count the number in that 10 sec and multiply by 6. Correct?
  • mtnbiker7

    Posts: 34

    Jan 05, 2010 3:33 AM GMT
    My cardiologist said to wear my HRM to bed on, and just read it first thing when I woke up to get a true resting rate.
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:49 AM GMT
    Funny that this came up because right around the time it was posted I was on the treadmill looking at a pulse of 175 and thinking that's a bit on the high side.... (I'm usually in the 150s, but maybe that's what I get for taking a few weeks off for the holidays.)

    DrobUA, see if you can verify the rates and consider scheduling a physical with the university's health services (back when I was a student I think this was free, or very close to it). They may also run some blood work to make sure all is good.

    Probably nothing to be concerned about, but an ounce of prevention....
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:56 AM GMT
    My resting heart rate is 58 bpm - if you're 90, I'm a monkey's uncle. If that's real, get thee to a doctor.

    Suffice to say, 200 is just off the charts unless you're a rabbit.
  • CincyBOJ

    Posts: 306

    Jan 05, 2010 4:07 AM GMT
    DrobUA saidok I just re-tried the resting heart rate a couple times and got an average of 90.

    My method, correct me if I'm wrong.

    Find the pulse in your neck. Look at a stop watch for 10 sec. Count the number in that 10 sec and multiply by 6. Correct?


    Just find a pulse, radial/ neck, hand on heart. don't use your thumb though.you can count 15 sec, 30 or the whole minute. You already have the idea. try not to watch the second hand if it ticks.

    My partner has a fast pulse (90's-100's) but he has health related issues related to that. If you still find it high (>90), do let your doc know. One more thing, to observe, how do you feel? tired, mellow, exhausted, peachy?

    Hope all is well BTW.
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 4:45 AM GMT
    CincyBOJ said
    DrobUA saidok I just re-tried the resting heart rate a couple times and got an average of 90.

    My method, correct me if I'm wrong.

    Find the pulse in your neck. Look at a stop watch for 10 sec. Count the number in that 10 sec and multiply by 6. Correct?


    Just find a pulse, radial/ neck, hand on heart. don't use your thumb though.you can count 15 sec, 30 or the whole minute. You already have the idea. try not to watch the second hand if it ticks.

    My partner has a fast pulse (90's-100's) but he has health related issues related to that. If you still find it high (>90), do let your doc know. One more thing, to observe, how do you feel? tired, mellow, exhausted, peachy?

    Hope all is well BTW.


    Just tried it again a couple times using the 15 sec and the 30 sec and all of them were in the 90's. I talked to my parents (I'm home for winter break) and they said it's prob just because of the meds I'm on. haha I'm always tired but thats why I'm on meds.

    Thanks for the responses though.
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Jan 05, 2010 4:46 AM GMT
    Your maximum heart rate is 220 minus your age. If your training goal is cardio, you should be at 85% of max, which is 220 - age x .85; if your training goal is to burn fat, you should run at about 65% of your max heart rate, which is 220 - age x .65, for 45 minutes max.

    If your resting heart rate is 85 or higher, you need to cease all workouts and strenuous work and immediately see a doctor/cardiologist. That is not normal or safe!! You could have a medical problem that could be complicated by these workouts/activities.
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    Jan 05, 2010 6:31 AM GMT
    mtnbiker7 saidMy cardiologist said to wear my HRM to bed on, and just read it first thing when I woke up to get a true resting rate.

    Smart cardiologist.
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    Jan 05, 2010 7:14 AM GMT
    hmm... yea it never hurts to get to a doctor and just make sure everything's alright, but if you feel in shape and have been working out consistently for a while I dont think its ne thing to urgent.
    better be safe than sorry tho, especially if its ur heart we're talking about.

    when i'm working out really hard I'll get a heart rate of about 172, which kinda scares me sometimes, but its not too bad. 155-165 is about where i rest when running a 6 30 mile. It can be scarry when i see my heart rate rocket up there... course my resting rate is like 50 and sometimes sub 50, which is scary slow sometimes

    has your heart rate been like this for a while or is it a new thing?
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    Jan 05, 2010 7:23 AM GMT
    second thoughts.... r u on stimulants? cuz that could explain it...
    but still a hr of 200 could still be bad for ur long term health even if you are on stimulants...
  • DrobUA

    Posts: 1331

    Jan 05, 2010 7:29 AM GMT
    rug12ds saidhmm... yea it never hurts to get to a doctor and just make sure everything's alright, but if you feel in shape and have been working out consistently for a while I dont think its ne thing to urgent.
    better be safe than sorry tho, especially if its ur heart we're talking about.

    when i'm working out really hard I'll get a heart rate of about 172, which kinda scares me sometimes, but its not too bad. 155-165 is about where i rest when running a 6 30 mile. It can be scarry when i see my heart rate rocket up there... course my resting rate is like 50 and sometimes sub 50, which is scary slow sometimes

    has your heart rate been like this for a while or is it a new thing?


    rug12ds saidsecond thoughts.... r u on stimulants? cuz that could explain it...
    but still a hr of 200 could still be bad for ur long term health even if you are on stimulants...


    I had never checked it before now so I'm not sure if this is new or not. I used to only swim and I just switched to running, which is when I noticed it.

    No I'm not on stimulants but I am on several medications for sleep issues.
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    Jan 05, 2010 7:32 AM GMT
    Was that a metric heart monitor?

    My resting heart rate hovers around 50 and my exercise rate is around your resting rate.
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    Jan 05, 2010 9:58 AM GMT
    ah, get your self a heart rate monitor, they are far more accurate, however.

    My resting heart rate during sleep (I had a halter monitor for 24s a few months back) was 52, my waking at rest was 62 during the day (waking) under heavy duress it would reach 188, however in 1 minute 32 seconds my heart rate would drop from 188 to 120 after completion after what ever i was doing and over 4 to 8 minutes would fall to 72 again.

    For me after heavy consultation with a cardiologist, getting an echo cardio gram, being put into an MRI machine to check my heart and valves and all manor of wonderful things, my heart rate is very acceptable and safe for my, my body and based off my physical size, the size and strength of my heart I wont experience any problems for a very very long time (baring anything unnatural)

    you being physically smaller (but still being human heh) your heart rate should under normal circumstances be lower under heavy duress and your resting heart rate should be a little lower too, you should check after about 30 minutes of inactivity (lay down and watch a none scary, none emotional movie) and then check, the most accurate is the halter monitor, but probably very unnecessary for you.

    What is really important though is you listen to your body, if you are experiencing any odd symptoms, such as, dizziness, shaking of extremities, vision problems, unrelated nausea, headaches, lethargy, troubles waking up, decreased appetite, increased urination that is seemingly unrelated to fluid intake or any problems specifically occurring during intense activity then you should go get checked out.