Nutrition advice: Over calories

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 05, 2010 11:25 AM GMT
    Hey all: I have a question...if I go over-calorie one day, should I restrict my calorie intake more severely the next? For instance, if I have a 2000 or 2100 calorie limit, and go 3000 calories one day, should I restrict to 1000 calories the following?
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    Jan 05, 2010 11:30 AM GMT
    You shouldn't need to, unless it's a daily thing you do, you won't gain any registrable weight if you go over occasionally, it takes a while to gain fat so na, you shouldn't need to adjust your next days calories, your body will probably thank you for a sudden influx of a few extra calories to burn up icon_smile.gif
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jan 05, 2010 11:44 AM GMT
    I know lots of guys who intentionally take one day a week
    and go all out
    They don't restrict at all on that one day and they look fantastic
    For me One day will turn to 2 and then 3.....
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    Jan 05, 2010 11:45 AM GMT
    GQjock saidFor me One day will turn to 2 and then 3.....

    yeah, I'm the same problem icon_sad.gif
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:04 PM GMT
    jimbobthedevil saidHey all: I have a question...if I go over-calorie one day, should I restrict my calorie intake more severely the next? For instance, if I have a 2000 or 2100 calorie limit, and go 3000 calories one day, should I restrict to 1000 calories the following?


    From what i've been reading (I'm starting a diet too) you should never go below a certain threshold, otherwise your weight loss will slow down as your body goes into 'starvation mode' and tries to retain as much energy (as fat) as possible. I'm not sure 1 day of calorie restriction would be a huge deal, but I also think that diets work best when you are allowed to cheat every once and a while.
  • LuckyPierre

    Posts: 192

    Jan 05, 2010 3:32 PM GMT
    As others have said-just carry on with your normal diet after the splurge.

    You should not be thinking of this as 'going on a diet'... you should be 'changing your diet'. You want to make a life change in what and how you eat so that the changes are permanent. What's the point of dropping some weight fast-only to gain it back? You want a sustainable meal plan that you can live with well after you have reached your goal weight. That means having some splurges once in awhile to keep you happy! icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 05, 2010 3:35 PM GMT
    No, eating only 1000 calories will put your body into famine mode, which makes it more apt to store food as fat. So I agree with everyone else, one day isn't going to make a difference in the grand scheme of a week.
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    Jan 05, 2010 5:40 PM GMT
    Don't sweat it. You absolutely do not want to be starving the next day. That's highly counter-productive and encourages metabolic lag. DO NOT DO THAT.
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    Jan 05, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    I say don't sweat it...but consider doing a little extra physical activity during the day to help balance you out. Walk the stairs instead of taking the elevator, do 100 push-ups before bed, etc. Might just be psychological, but it makes be feel better after I've gone overboard.
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    Jan 05, 2010 7:19 PM GMT
    Going over 1000 calories for just one day? I think you're worrying about nothing. Increase the intensity of your next workout, and you should "even out".
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    Jan 05, 2010 7:25 PM GMT
    We try to hit the buffet at least once a week. It tells your body there's no shortage of food.

    Your body heads towards homeostasis every chance it gets. If you eat more calories more often you have a higher set point, and a higher level of performance (stoking the furnace it's called). The opposite is true if you restrict calories.