Gluten-Free Diet and Training for a Half-Marathon

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    Jan 11, 2010 2:56 AM GMT
    I have been recently diagnosed with a gluten-allergy, which has completely thrown me for a major loop. Dealing with no beer is one thing, but no bread or pasta is a major dietary issue. As I have started training for half-marathons, I have need for good sources of carbohydrates. Any suggestions for those you out there with celiac disease or other gluten-allergies/intolerances?
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    Jan 11, 2010 7:18 PM GMT
    Lotsa carbs, no gluten: potatoes, rice, carrots, fruit, sweetpotatoes, quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, dried beans
  • Timbales

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    Jan 11, 2010 7:21 PM GMT
    There are tons of options for gluten-free eating. You can find several styles of pasta made with rice instead of wheat, plus lots of baking mixes fro gluten-free pancakes and baked goods. Check out your local health food store or the special sections of your grocery store.
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    Jan 11, 2010 7:35 PM GMT
    Go to Whole Foods- there's a whole gluten free section there, even gluten-free beer! My bf has a gluten allergy so we've changed everything that we eat. This brand is carried at a lot of regular grocery stores too, so look for it:

    http://www.foodforlife.com/gluten-free-wheat-free-breads.html
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    Jan 11, 2010 7:45 PM GMT
    I feel your pain since I found out on my own that I have a wheat allergy. I refuse to add it back to my diet in order to have it diagnosed to see what it is really for sure. Not going to put myself through that for a few weeks to find out. At least I get to avoid the baked items that is offered to me so I get to save myself the calories.

    There are gluten free beers available. You should be able to find Anheuser-Busch's Redbridge. It is not like the real thing, but can help when a beer mood strikes.

    You will have to learn to read ingredients labels when shopping. There are still hidden wheat ingredients to look for. European products do not list wheat as an allergen. Wheat sucrose is a sweetener that is used in some chocolates.

    You can find rice pastas and other grocery items in stores. More products are becoming available and tend to be on the pricey side. As for gluten-free breads, I have not found one that I like. The breads made with rice flour tend to be grainy. You can find that Chex cereal offers some gluten-free cereal along with corn flakes.

    Eating out can be difficult. Restaurants are slowly providing a gluten-free menu items. There are websites that list restaurants that offer gluten-free. You may find one to two local pizza places that offer a gluten free pizza crust.
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    Jan 11, 2010 7:53 PM GMT
    Also many people will not understand your gluten issue. Most people do not associate flour as being wheat, so I have to explain to them all the time.

    Bob's Red Mill offers a lot of gluten-free products.

    http://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-free/

    Betty Crocker is now offering products.

    http://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free

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    Jan 11, 2010 9:05 PM GMT
    Thanks for all the wonderful suggestions guys. I think that eating out is going to be the most difficult, because of the lack of control and because I eat out 15 meals a week on average. My New Year's Resolution was to eat-in more often, and I think that this will actually help me a bit. I hope that finding substitute carbs (potatoes, rice) doesn't add too many calories to my daily diet (I stuck to mainly whole wheats and oats previously).

    Its also wonderful to see that AB makes a gluten-free beer--that was going to be my biggest test. I went to the grocery store yesterday and just stared at the beer aisle, mourning the absence of a good friend!!
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    Jan 11, 2010 9:52 PM GMT
    Buffhunk64 saidAm a personal trainer in Dallas and for the last two months I have been on the gluten-free diet as well. I have a sensitivity to gluten products. Types of grains/starches we can have include: corn, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, quinoa, millet, potatoes and Teff. You have to be creative. You might also visit an Asian market or Indian market. You can find white rice flour, garbanzo bean flour, corn flour, 100% rice noodles. Buckwheat, quinoa and millet have great supplies of nutrients in them and Teff is very high in protein and iron. Experiment! I make some really good white rice flour, corn flour and potato starch pancakes. Are they exactly like wheat flour pancakes? No, but I can eat and enjoy them.


    I have to second all these suggestions. I've also been on gluten-free diet for over a year now. At first I thought I would die without pasta and stuff.

    But I now have a lot of things to eat. Quinoa is my best friend, as well as buckwheat. Teff for breakfast is fantastic. I just made Teff peanut butter cookies (I truly miss cookies).

    Some gf pasta is tasting better (personal opinion, no doubt). There is pasta from Italy made from corn - pretty tasty. Pasta made from rice alone is kinda nasty.

    Most bread tastes like a wet sponge, but lately I have found bread made with corn, tapioca flour and buckwheat. Pretty good, at last.

    Best of luck - you'll get used to it.
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    Jan 11, 2010 9:55 PM GMT
    Scorpio_M saidAlso many people will not understand your gluten issue. Most people do not associate flour as being wheat, so I have to explain to them all the time.

    Bob's Red Mill offers a lot of gluten-free products.

    http://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-free/

    Betty Crocker is now offering products.

    http://www.bettycrocker.com/products/gluten-free



    Agreed on Bob's Red Mill. Their stone ground oatmeal is superb.

    Cook's Illustrated just picked some of the Betty Crocker stuff as really good, and that's impressive for them to pick anything of the sort. I haven't tried it yet, but I see it is easier to find.

    So true about people not getting that wheat is the source of gluten, or that flour is wheat. A friend recently was so proud to offer me something to eat - she had worked hard (she said) to think of something I could eat that would be wheat free, so she made sour dough! LOL!

    I always quote that movie line from the Greek wedding movie where the mom says for the vegetarian "I'll cook lamb!"