Texas Conservatives Closer To Banning Cesar Chavez From School Textbooks

  • metta

    Posts: 39155

    Jan 11, 2010 9:00 AM GMT


    http://newsjunkiepost.com/2010/01/10/texas-conservatives-closer-to-banning-cesar-chavez-from-school-textbooks/
  • drypin

    Posts: 1798

    Jan 11, 2010 11:57 AM GMT
    I say... switch to year-round school and then you have time to keep all god's chillin in the book.
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    Jan 11, 2010 12:03 PM GMT
    Yeah, they talked about removing Neil Armstrong from Science textbooks this year as well because he had a degree in engineering and not in Science. I am not sure if that is still being considered or not.

    The Texas bored of education is kind of the national laboratory for bad ideas in education.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Jan 11, 2010 12:04 PM GMT
    Pretty soon American history will only be written by the Christian church. Anything else will be considered blasphemy. Why does this all sound familiar?
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    Jan 11, 2010 12:14 PM GMT
    Every day, in some new way, I find myself glad that I live in Massachusetts.
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    Jan 11, 2010 1:07 PM GMT
    Joe52 saidEvery day, in some new way, I find myself glad that I live in Massachusetts.


    Amen, Joe.

    oww... was that phrase a bit too Bible Belt?
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    Jan 11, 2010 1:39 PM GMT
    WOW!
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    Jan 11, 2010 1:51 PM GMT
    One more reason I'm happy to live in the Northeast. Those types of conservatives up here have very little power.

    The Texas Board of Education is a joke--the majority of its members are radical conservatives appointed by a radical governor.

    The same fight has been going on with evolution and its role in science classrooms.
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    Jan 11, 2010 2:39 PM GMT
    These are the same people who want us to believe the fiction that America is now a post-racial society. icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 11, 2010 2:47 PM GMT
    This is Texas' strategy of illegal immigration control. They're hoping that Mexicans will see just how unbelievably stupid the general population of Texas must be and decide to turn back to the relative genius of Mexico.
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    Jan 11, 2010 2:50 PM GMT
    I facebooked this article - I am SOOOOOO thankful I moved out of TEXAS!

    And now I have a little niece that has to deal with the backwards ASS education system in Austin - THEY HAVE A STREET NAMED after this historical figure in AUSTIN.
    BUT he is not good enough to be in a textbook! WTF!

    UGHHHHH!
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    Jan 11, 2010 3:41 PM GMT
    Never mind illegal immigration, Hispanics represent the majority of children being born in the state of Texas, and I wouldn't be surprised if they're the majority of school children either.
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    Jan 11, 2010 4:25 PM GMT
    Those of us not a citizen of this generally wacko state (though I admit the politics of my own state are no better) are still quite affected by decisions made there: The textbook market in Texas is so huge, publishers very often bend to whatever the Texas Boards demand. Much the same way that manufacturers bend to whatever Walmart demands. If you don't get your products into the country's largest retailer, you're losing a ton of money. If you don't get your textbooks into one of the country's biggest states, you're losing a ton of money, too.

    Chavez probably doesn't stand a chance now, not in Texas, and not in Massachusetts, either.
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    Jan 11, 2010 4:27 PM GMT
    From the article:
    (Cesar Chavez) “lacks the stature…and contributions” and should not “be held up to our children as someone worthy of emulation.”

    Well Christ, you could say the same about Hitler, but would you take him out of history books?
  • mivbsetter

    Posts: 2

    Jan 11, 2010 4:33 PM GMT
    I worked with the United Farm Workers in the late 80s and closely with Cesar Chavez. He truly was an amazing person.
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    Jan 12, 2010 12:35 AM GMT
    BRIX saidThose of us not a citizen of this generally wacko state (though I admit the politics of my own state are no better) are still quite affected by decisions made there: The textbook market in Texas is so huge, publishers very often bend to whatever the Texas Boards demand. Much the same way that manufacturers bend to whatever Walmart demands. If you don't get your products into the country's largest retailer, you're losing a ton of money. If you don't get your textbooks into one of the country's biggest states, you're losing a ton of money, too.

    Chavez probably doesn't stand a chance now, not in Texas, and not in Massachusetts, either.

    You obviously don't know Massachusetts well. We're a center of text book publishing and we don't burden our children with Texas dreck.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 12, 2010 12:39 AM GMT
    There are more freaks in Texas than in all the other states combined.

    The reason they want to ban Cesar Chavez is because he is a hero who fought for humane rights for Mexican farm workers.

    The slave culture is still alive and well in the South, and Texas certainly doesn't want it's impoverished workers to find out that they have rights, like safe working conditions and a minimum wage.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 12, 2010 12:41 AM GMT
    In California, State workers get Cesar Chavez' birthday off from work, with pay. It's the last Monday(?) in March.
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    Jan 12, 2010 12:43 AM GMT
    McGay saidThis is Texas' strategy of illegal immigration control. They're hoping that Mexicans will see just how unbelievably stupid the general population of Texas must be and decide to turn back to the relative genius of Mexico.


    Teach me, Obi Wan.
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    Jan 12, 2010 12:46 AM GMT
    Well, as conservative as Kern County, CA is (where I live in Tehachapi) at least we reflect local history properly: less than 8 miles from my house is the National Cesar Chavez Center, where he used to live.

    I think he did some wonderful things for farm workers.
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    Jan 12, 2010 12:51 AM GMT
    Joe52 saidYou obviously don't know Massachusetts well. We're a center of text book publishing and we don't burden our children with Texas dreck.


    No one claimed the textbook publishers were in Texas. The fact is that the State School Board of Texas is the second largest purchaser of textbooks in the nation. When you have that much purchasing power, you also have power to influence what's in those books. Even a publisher in Massachusetts will think twice about including a topic that the State School Board of Texas finds objectionable if it means that publisher will possibly lose millions of dollars in sales.

    It almost always comes down to the Almighty Dollar. Hence the Walmart Effect on education, further hegemony, the Great Leveler venturing forth to make every place more the same as any other place and help every student learn what the Great Leveler wants us to learn. Unless of course you break out and learn on your own... but that doesn't describe most of us.
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    Jan 12, 2010 1:05 AM GMT
    Those are serious balls.
  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jan 12, 2010 5:01 AM GMT
    Im not sure why people worship him. He was not any kind of a fan of illegal immigration. All he turned out to be was a paranoid union thug.

    I say "Do it, Texas."
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    Jan 12, 2010 5:28 AM GMT
    JP85257 saidIm not sure why people worship him. He was not any kind of a fan of illegal immigration. All he turned out to be was a paranoid union thug.

    I say "Do it, Texas."


    I think you'd feel differently if you had to work even ONE day on a farm as a migrant picker in the days before Chavez fought for their rights as workers. I've worked on a farm, we grew peaches (100 acres' worth) and we hired Mexican workers for ALL of our harvesting. Even these days, the work is still tough and the hours long.

  • JP85257

    Posts: 3284

    Jan 12, 2010 5:37 AM GMT
    zeebyaboi said
    JP85257 saidIm not sure why people worship him. He was not any kind of a fan of illegal immigration. All he turned out to be was a paranoid union thug.

    I say "Do it, Texas."


    I think you'd feel differently if you had to work even ONE day on a farm as a migrant picker in the days before Chavez fought for their rights as workers. I've worked on a farm, we grew peaches (100 acres' worth) and we hired Mexican workers for ALL of our harvesting. Even these days, the work is still tough and the hours long.


    He caused more problems for the state of Arizona than Napolitano did. Do some research on him. There are always 2 perspectives.

    Why would I work on a farm? No need for me to.