HOW WILL WE SURVIVE TOO MUCH MEDIA, TOO MANY CHOICES?

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    Jan 12, 2010 4:12 AM GMT
    They say that the future of communication and entertainment will be internet content on your TV. CES this past week already announced a slew of new products for this. I see this virtually killing networks and cable stations, as people will click over to what people are doing on the web. Anyone will be able to create their own " tv station" then via web pages and content. New stars will arise, and there will be less control by broadcasters on what we consume and watch.

    This means there is going to be A LOT of choices. Is this a good thing? Will we get lost in it, not knowing what we want or should want to look at? What will this do for sales of books, movies, music, etc?



  • omatix

    Posts: 89

    Jan 12, 2010 4:54 AM GMT
    I'm a lifelong 24/7 geek, always glued to a screen, and even I'm feeling saturated with the amount of "connectedness" I have these days.

    I don't really want it anymore. I love the technical wow-that's-cool side of having news, weather and Facebook on my cellphone's homescreen, but it drives me a little insane sometimes to know that all this info is streaming at me all the time.

    I know that this is a little different from what you were saying, but I think it's related. Lots of media. Everywhere. Head explode.
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    Jan 12, 2010 4:57 AM GMT
    Omatix saidI'm a lifelong 24/7 geek, always glued to a screen, and even I'm feeling saturated with the amount of "connectedness" I have these days.

    I don't really want it anymore. I love the technical wow-that's-cool side of having news, weather and Facebook on my cellphone's homescreen, but it drives me a little insane sometimes to know that all this info is streaming at me all the time.

    I know that this is a little different from what you were saying, but I think it's related. Lots of media. Everywhere. Head explode.


    I definitely get what you are saying. I listened to a talk radio spot a few weeks ago, and a man described TV as " like having Las Vegas in your house". Too much noise, too much happening. He even worked in the entertainment industry, but when he got home at night, NO TV.
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    Jan 12, 2010 5:02 AM GMT
    Most households today seem to have more than a hundred cable stations, but only watch a few of them. True at our house, probably 20 channels watched out of out of 300. I probably don't log onto more than 20-30 websites in a week. I would guess most people's habits won't change too much.
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    Jan 12, 2010 5:08 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidThey say that the future of communication and entertainment will be internet content on your TV. CES this past week already announced a slew of new products for this. I see this virtually killing networks and cable stations, as people will click over to what people are doing on the web. Anyone will be able to create their own " tv station" then via web pages and content. New stars will arise, and there will be less control by broadcasters on what we consume and watch.

    This means there is going to be A LOT of choices. Is this a good thing? Will we get lost in it, not knowing what we want or should want to look at? What will this do for sales of books, movies, music, etc?



    Television destroyed civilization decades ago. This is just the death rattle of the last few gasps of air escaping the lungs as we drown in the inrushing liquid of our own culture flood.

    But at least whoever or whatever finds this planet will have a mind-boggling wealth of anthropological artifacts to exhibit in whatever passes for museums or information storage databases.


    bc_puddleglum.jpg

    Ugh. Perhaps another tiny, inconsequential example of our approaching brain death can be found in the picture itself -- a literary reference that contains an obvious grammatical error. It's pretty sad, considering the caption is quoted directly from the book (my favorite in the series, by the way, and my favorite character). Imagine the person who created the picture: getting the book off the shelf, flipping through it to find the right passage, using something heavy - perhaps an iPhone or Netbook - to hold the pages flat, looking back and forth while keying the words into the computer. And yet, in the act of transcribing, introducing an error not in the original, as if correcting it. It's not that any one error signals the death of Western Civ., but then again every four years a few million careless errors add up to another Tweedledum being elected President. Or was it Tweedledee this last go-round? I fear I've lost track of the difference.
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    Jan 12, 2010 5:13 AM GMT
    considering Scripps choice to remove the Food Netwrk and HGTV while negotiating w/ cablevision here in the tri state area, I say go for it and hopefully someone will give them a run for there money since they want a 2 hundred million dollar increase.
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Jan 12, 2010 5:18 AM GMT
    wrestlervic saidHOW WILL WE SURVIVE TOO MUCH MEDIA, TOO MANY CHOICES?


    ... turn it off.

    kill_your_tv001.jpg

    See+no+Evil+Speak+no+Evil+Hear+no+Evil_J
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    Jan 12, 2010 5:19 AM GMT
    . . . very well said, sporting chance . . .

    . . . and as much as I would like to see it, there will never be a revolution led by bibliophiles . . . we just aren't the types . . . it would a hoot to watch, though . . . like Dukakis on a tank . . .

    . . . and has anyone else noticed how shallow even the ostensibly educated types are these days? . . . it's amazing what even professional well-placed and well-paid people don't know . . . and, hey, don't even bother with a literary reference or a witty allusion . . .
  • omatix

    Posts: 89

    Jan 12, 2010 5:20 AM GMT
    I don't have cable - it's too much money for one person, if you ask me. I download most TV shows I like or watch it on Hulu. But even without cable, the internet is addictive enough. I've thought of switching off my cable internet and limiting myself to whatever I can bear over my cellphone's connection. But then I'd be out some genuinely creative, good, planned TV watching. Maybe that wouldn't be as much of a loss as I think.
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Jan 12, 2010 5:23 AM GMT
    noren said. . . very well said, sporting chance . . .

    . . . and as much as I would like to see it, there will never be a revolution led by bibliophiles . . . we just aren't the types . . . it would a hoot to watch, though . . . like Dukakis on a tank . . .

    . . . and has anyone else noticed how shallow even the ostensibly educated types are these days? . . . it's amazing what even professional well-placed and well-paid people don't know . . . and, hey, don't even bother with a literary reference or a witty allusion . . .


    What about my hero? She's a professional.
    susan-boyle-pic-itv-150409-thumb-450x324
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Jan 12, 2010 10:57 AM GMT
    Television as a broadcasting entity of 3, 4 or 5 stations that own the market is dead
    The TV is rapidly becoming the one set medium that will give us
    our internet - paid TV programming - video - and Skype type video telephone
    That Time is already here in my house
    I use My own TV for all of that
    and I never watch regular TV anymore
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 12, 2010 4:14 PM GMT
    I may watch two hours of actual television a month. Now, youtube is a different story..but I have the ability to actively seek exactly what I want to see or learn about.. I find television to be dumbing and a very effective tool for making people far more secular than they already are which is..too much. I have my television for my video games ( a little hypocritical, I know), a couple of movies and that's about it.