so I just bought a road bike.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 14, 2010 2:36 PM GMT
    It's an old green International cycle company/international bike company?
    I don't really know anything about bikes, so maybe you guys could tell me if I got ripped off. I gave the guy sixty bucks for it.


    I got it to ride back and forth from class, and it's an old ten speed that evidently they don't even make anymore?



    so anyway, I went to my weightlifting class and the teacher cancelled and i had to basically ride right back home and boy oh boy, it's intense. The hills here in huntsville are not forgiving, especially if you haven't ridden a bike in a while.


    so, I'm hoping I can do this a few times a week until it becomes easier and then eventually quit using my car unless I've got to use the highway.

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    Jan 14, 2010 4:12 PM GMT
    Congratulations! Stick with it, and you'll be so happy regardless of how much you bought it for (I'm not a bike expert so I can't say whether you overpaid or not). Have you taken it to a local bike shop to get a tune up? Maybe it's not necessary, but if you've got a bit of extra cash it couldn't hurt (unless you want to invest that cash in figuring out how to tune it up yourself, which is even better since it will let you get to know your bike a bit better). I procured a bike and used it to ride back and forth to work, the farmer's market, the coffee shop, day rides, etc. in the year before I left the states and there was no better investment.

    I encourage you to keep with it a few times a week; eventually you'll be able to ride it back and forth to work/wherever every day (if you can't already) and you'll grow to love it. Bikes are a wonderful investment and pay dividends in so many ways: health, happiness, fun, the environment, etc.
  • CAtoFL

    Posts: 834

    Jan 14, 2010 4:21 PM GMT
    Yay! An actual 'jock' related post on here!

    Chewey's right about getting a tuneup on your new bike. I'd also have your bike shop fit it to you. If you're riding a bike that doesn't fit your body, you're likely to either hate it and give it up or end up getting injured. And wear a helmet, too.
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    Jan 14, 2010 5:15 PM GMT
    Awesome. I got a road bike. His name is Fernando. He's my baby. Ride that thing to class and you'll drop pounds so fast, it'll make your head spin.
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    Jan 17, 2010 9:07 PM GMT
    $60 is nothing, if the thing is rideable then you got your money's worth .
    a 10 speeder is good, use the gears a lot, changing them to keep a fairly high cadence instead of mashing the pedals down .
    tune up would be good but you don't need a total overhaul , just get the brakes checked ( most important, haha) . Your chain and cogs could be worn out too but if your chain isn't skipping under pressure, don't worry about it- if you're on a budget it's not a priority.
    Keep your tires well inflated , probably around 80-100 psi for that type of city bike. Check how worn out they are, replacing them is cheap.

    apart from that, just have fun with the thing. Hope you get hooked and then upgrade to a real machine. icon_smile.gif .. and spend major money icon_sad.gif haha.

  • Glorfindel

    Posts: 277

    Jan 17, 2010 9:10 PM GMT
    I was gonna say.. if you paid $60 for a road bike and it works (no rust on the crank, no bent rims, tires not dry rotted, and the gears shift), then you scored. icon_smile.gif Have fun riding to class! Enjoy the bike!
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    Jan 17, 2010 9:20 PM GMT
    Definitely get it tuned up and sized, invest in a few extra inner tubes and a pump. Make sure you keep the tires inflated to the right PSI, most tires go because they aren't maintained properly.

    The hills will get easier, keep at it and you will be surprised at how quickly you move past them.

    As far as the cost... SCORE!! The most important thing is that you are comfortable and enjoy it. $60 is a great price for being able to ride around. I have a bike I spent $200 on just to ride to work and I have a $2,500 bike for racing. The important thing is that *you* love your bike... it can change the way you see yourself and the way you see the world, "no shit".
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    Jan 18, 2010 12:12 AM GMT
    well here's the whole deal.

    the guy i got it from is a cyclist because he was getting rid of excess stock from his apartment. the tires aren't new, but they're properly inflated, and the brake pads are new.


    the company is the international bicycle corporation, and the only thing I've been able to find out about them is one guy asking the same question in two different bike forums in about 2007.

    they were apparently distributed through Canada, but imported from italy and then later from Japan. Other than that, I don't know ANYTHING about the bike. pics soon and maybe you guys can shed some light on the subject.
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    Jan 18, 2010 12:15 AM GMT
    Let us know how your first ride goes!
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    Jan 18, 2010 2:55 AM GMT
    zarin saidLet us know how your first ride goes!
    uhm.....


    I already did?
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    Jan 18, 2010 5:29 AM GMT
    still check the pressure every time you ride it, those tires always lose pressure.
    what easilydistracted added is very true. Have the bike adjusted to your body to avoid knee , lower back and neck pain .
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    Jan 18, 2010 5:47 AM GMT
    You didn't get ripped off. You can't buy a piece of shit bike at walmart for 60 bucks.

    It's probably not racing stock these days, but if you invest in quality/durable components it could last you years.

    cheers!
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    Jan 22, 2010 5:29 AM GMT
    If it's your starter bike and you just want to get out and ride around, it's going to work for you. Like everyone said, get it tuned up and some new inner tubes and some bike lube. I started riding on an old Pacer steel frame bicycle from the 80's for a while till I knew I was going to commit more into cycling. Then I went to my trusy bike shop and laid some cash down on really good bike.

    The approach you're taking is smart and I congrat you on it. Also if you are riding it for the purpose of commuting, a $60 bike will stay longer in a bike stand then a $1200 bike unless that $1200 comes with a security guard.

    Have fun out on the road!
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    Jan 22, 2010 6:19 AM GMT
    I ride my bike a lot every week and my back tire seems to catch a flat tire as soon as I put a new tire every month or two. It has become a little excessive for my money pocket in replacing the tire. So, I heard from a friend of mine there is some kind of special foam you put on your tires to protect the rubber from sharp objects getting through. I'm not sure what the name of the product is, but I'm sure bike stores sell this... any ideas?
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    Jan 22, 2010 8:02 AM GMT
    Hobbes saidI ride my bike a lot every week and my back tire seems to catch a flat tire as soon as I put a new tire every month or two. It has become a little excessive for my money pocket in replacing the tire. So, I heard from a friend of mine there is some kind of special foam you put on your tires to protect the rubber from sharp objects getting through. I'm not sure what the name of the product is, but I'm sure bike stores sell this... any ideas?


    Well, there are a number of products that you can put inside your tires that act as sealants for small punctures; you can find them at any local hardware store. Or you can just have your local bike shop fill your tires with sealant.
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    Feb 04, 2010 6:31 PM GMT
    The $50 mountain bike I had been riding for years died. I wore the teeth off my three chainrings and to replace it would have been more than what I bought the bike for.

    So I bought a road bike and it is bike sex. I get to work so much faster with much less effort. Now all I have to do is actually adjust it so the thing fits and life will be good.
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    Feb 05, 2010 6:37 PM GMT
    road bikes fly on the road compared to mtbikes for sure.
    you'll find you need checking tire pressure much more often though.
    and it will be more prone to punctures , if you don't race or train hard with it, it's often better to go for 23 or even 25 X 700 tires. .. more resistant.
    but you'll still wear out your chain, rings and cassette ..:p
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    Feb 05, 2010 8:41 PM GMT
    MunchingZombie saidThe $50 mountain bike I had been riding for years died. I wore the teeth off my three chainrings and to replace it would have been more than what I bought the bike for.

    So I bought a road bike and it is bike sex. I get to work so much faster with much less effort. Now all I have to do is actually adjust it so the thing fits and life will be good.


    This is something I've long suspected and why I want to buy a road bike when I'm back in the states. I also used my mountain bike for road biking, but figured that a road bike would make things so much faster and more pleasant.

    Ah yet another thing to spend my readjustment allowance on.

    Xannantex, what do you think about getting the tubes filled with that anti-puncture stuff? I got it put in my mountain bike tires and didn't notice any appreciable difference in terms of how I rode; just that I didn't have to get my tires fixed so damned often.
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    Feb 07, 2010 3:19 AM GMT
    i 'm addicted to Notubes sealant. ( actually i use the Geaxx one ).
    If you have regular tires, you need the whole Stan Notube kit ( rim strip, valve, sealant ) but if you get Tubeless ready tires, you only need the sealant.
    I love the stuff for trail riding, i can't count the number of times it saved me from fixing a flat .

    BUT the BIG bonus is it allows you to ride at really low pressure , like 25-26psi .
    It does wonders to traction, especially in wet gnarly conditions.
    well everywhere in fact. I love it.

    Last summer i still had to fix a snake byte though. If the cut is too big, the sealant won't manage to shut it . But my problem was simply that i didn't have enough liquid in. It does dry up over time. You need to check it out once every 8 weeks perhaps.

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    Feb 07, 2010 3:33 AM GMT
    I want a road bike... I already have a mtb which is awesome on the trails but I have a gnarly uphill commute in the morning. A lighter, faster bike would make my life so much easier.

    Maybe if I get a good tax return I can rationalize buying a second bike?