One for the HR guys - or anyone else who might comment!

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 4:18 PM GMT
    Hey guys,

    Here's my situation, perhaps you might care to comment.

    My current boss is about to be promoted, leaving her position open.

    She has already indicated to me that I would be in the mix to take over her role.

    Already, though, there is someone above me who has been there longer and is possibly expecting to get the role.

    As for me, well, I have loads more experience in her same role - I did it before with another company for ten years.

    The third option for the company is to advertise outside, and see if there is someone else who might jump onboard.

    So, this is the way I see it:

    If they give it to the other guy, they will be honouring his hard work and acknowledging their HR policy of growing people and recruiting from within.
    The downside is that he is still very young and needs a lot of training in the finer details of the job (such as IR laws, financials and budgeting).
    I would still be happy to work under him, he is a nice guy.

    If they give it to me, they will be promoting me to manager after only six months with the company. I have all the skills needed, along with a history in the role, business acumen and maturity that is needed for the job.
    I am concerned that the other guy would be fairly pissed off if I got the job ahead of him, and if he therefore decided to leave, I would be left with a big hole in the team - the current manager being promoted out of the team, and the resignation of the other guy etc etc

    The third option - to hire from the outside - would mean that we are having to train another person in our ways, and would mean that both me and the other guy (above) would have to in fact do the job whilst we trained some outsider. I think resentment from us both might sink anyone coming into our team.

    What would you do?

    I have come up with another option, which I believe is the best, but I would need to put it to the Exec Management and play my cards right.

    I think the best way forward is to split the job between me and the other guy involved.
    Make us both Assistant Managers, and give us equal control over the department and each of us are given areas of the department to look after.

    That way, the salary of the current manager is divided (thus not affecting payroll at all) and we are each given a promotion and pay rise, along with added responsibility. We can each offer our respective strengths, without anyone's toes being stepped on.

    Your thoughts?
  • Laurence

    Posts: 942

    Jan 15, 2010 5:50 PM GMT
    Interesting.

    I would think that company management would give the role to the guy above you, especially if that's their policy and he is working his way up.

    However I like your idea of splitting the role, and I don't think it would do you any harm to write up the proposal and present it to the outgoing candidate and your employers. It shows that you've got ideas and are ambitious - which is no bad thing.

    Good luck

    Loz
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19123

    Jan 15, 2010 6:08 PM GMT
    I agree with Laurence. Perhaps the company management is conflicted as well about the decision, and your taking the initiative to propose an alternative idea would at the very least be appreciated and not be forgotten. It also makes sense for the company to have two people able to do the same job should one suddenly quit, be let go, become ill, whatever. I do feel, however, that the other guy who has been with the company longer probably deserves the promotion. We all have to pay our dues, and longevity and loyalty with a company usually is rewarded -- as it should be.

    Good luck!
  • owen19832006

    Posts: 1035

    Jan 15, 2010 6:08 PM GMT
    i have been in your situation before and sorry to break the news but chances are you wont get it because you have just been with the company for 6 months or so, the guy might get because he;s been there longer, and they need to be politically correct, i got pissed off and left, and is the reaction the guy might have if you're one who gets promoted instead of him.
    to illustrate my point this happened in my new job: manager left to form own business, this other guy had been in line to get that job for 12 years! guess what happened? they gave the job to another guy aged 31 who used to work in another town!
    the guy with 12year waiting had a nervous breakdown.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 6:38 PM GMT
    I have seen all three scenarios happen during my years at Hewlett-Packard and Syntex (now Roche). I'm sure we've all seen the companies go out and recruit for an opening - - even though they have one or two internal candidates already in the wings, so to speak. Whenever I found myself in the position of choosing between two people (just as in your example) I found myself looking beyond the years of service and putting more weight to the person's qualifications and how well he interacted with the rest of the team. I try to look at the whole picture. I wouldn't worry too much about one guy getting mad and quitting..........that could happen at any time. I've seen cases where you give the opportunity to the long term employee and then he leaves anyway......for greener pastures! I'd pick the guy I like best - one who will do things my way and blend best with my plans for the dept. Good luck. From where I'm sitting, you're the best candidate for the opening.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 8:00 PM GMT
    you are going to put it to Exec Management? just curious, but have they asked you for an opinion?

    if a posting is made for the position; apply for it and may the best man win.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 8:02 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidI agree with Laurence. Perhaps the company management is conflicted as well about the decision, and your taking the initiative to propose an alternative idea would at the very least be appreciated and not be forgotten. It also makes sense for the company to have two people able to do the same job should one suddenly quit, be let go, become ill, whatever. I do feel, however, that the other guy who has been with the company longer probably deserves the promotion. We all have to pay our dues, and longevity and loyalty with a company usually is rewarded -- as it should be.

    Good luck!


    loyalty with a company?

    eh, those words still go together?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 8:28 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you saidyou are going to put it to Exec Management? just curious, but have they asked you for an opinion?
    .


    Umm, no, they haven't asked me for an opinion, but the reason why I am in the current position I am in is because they employed me to have an opinion.
    Thanks for the question.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 15, 2010 8:29 PM GMT
    Blackguy4you said
    CuriousJockAZ saidI agree with Laurence. Perhaps the company management is conflicted as well about the decision, and your taking the initiative to propose an alternative idea would at the very least be appreciated and not be forgotten. It also makes sense for the company to have two people able to do the same job should one suddenly quit, be let go, become ill, whatever. I do feel, however, that the other guy who has been with the company longer probably deserves the promotion. We all have to pay our dues, and longevity and loyalty with a company usually is rewarded -- as it should be.

    Good luck!


    loyalty with a company?

    eh, those words still go together?


    Some of us still are.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2010 4:58 PM GMT
    the words "in the mix" are the death knell here