Health Care Spending Vs. Average Life Expectancy

  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Jan 16, 2010 1:15 AM GMT
    To find the US, please see the very top in Orange...

    The left of the cart - how much each country spends on health care per person

    The right shows average life expectancy in each country

    The thickness of the lines indicate how many doctor visits per year the average citizen gets.

    health_care_spending_big.png


    http://blogs.ngm.com/blog_central/2009/12/the-cost-of-care.html

    http://www.amptoons.com/blog/archives/2010/01/13/look-how-much-more-the-us-spends-on-health-care-than-anyplace-else/


    And that is what the tea baggers are trying to keep!
  • davepalen

    Posts: 25

    Jan 16, 2010 4:56 PM GMT
    There are a variety of stats that can be manipulated. It seems logical to me that medical care provided by the private sector is superior than anything from the government. Try going to the postal service vs. UPS or Federal Express. If we are concerned about HIV drugs, from what country are new developments coming from? The USA leads the way. Fuck it up with Obamacare crap and let's see what we have ten years from now.
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    Jan 16, 2010 6:23 PM GMT
    I am unfamiliar with health care in the US. But, there must be a lot of wastage generated by multiple tests, expensive tests and multiple specialist visits- all generated by a fee for service system. Additionally, the cost of a similar medication is priced higher in the US compared to other parts of the world- they can pay these premium costs. These interventions do not improve health care but generate high health costs. Obviously, those who get an excellent medical insurance plan as part of their job stand to gain. It would be interesting to further break down the US health dollar spending using specific demographic factors such as race, gender and social status.
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jan 16, 2010 6:27 PM GMT
    Yeah, it would be nice if there was more context taken into consideration though.
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    Jan 16, 2010 6:53 PM GMT
    I bet it would be even more shocking if you compare the difference of life expectancies between the uber rich and the dirt poor or even just the middle class.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 7:02 PM GMT
    Am I the only one that doesn't quite get what the graph is showing?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    MsclDrew saidAm I the only one that doesn't quite get what the graph is showing?


    Americans pay more, go to the doctor less and die sooner. That is what it wants to communicate.
  • allatonce

    Posts: 904

    Jan 16, 2010 7:23 PM GMT
    Seriously how can someone just look at that graph and then continue to argue for the status quo. The strongest aspect of the Obama campaign was change- everyone wanted it. The repubs seem to always be representing status quo and doing whatever they can to stop change. Looking at how popular the idea of change was, doesn't it seem stupid to brand yourslelf (implicitly) as the party representing status quo?

    In terms of dollars for outcome, the US health system is one of the least efficient in the world.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 7:26 PM GMT
    Lostboy said
    MsclDrew saidAm I the only one that doesn't quite get what the graph is showing?


    Americans pay more, go to the doctor less and die sooner. That is what it wants to communicate.


    Yeah that's common knowledge icon_neutral.gif

    But I'd like to be able to read the graph....I'm anticipating being on a podium and trying to bluff my way through a graph some day and would like to not have to rely on solely my instincts
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 7:35 PM GMT
    I'm a little confused as to why the author of this graph chose to use such a cumbersome method of displaying his data. Why not just make a nice bar graph or something... The presence of two Y-axes and lack of an X-axis just seems a bit silly to me... Wouldn't it be much more logical to me to just have spending on one axis and life expectancy on the perpendicular axis.... but maybe I'm missing something.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 11:19 PM GMT
    I don't understand what's so complicated.. The graphs show on the left side how much is spent on average per citizien for healthcare.. follow the line to the right hand side and see what the life expectancy of a citizen in that country is...

    The USA is waaaay up there on the left side and falls dramatically to the right side for a near below average life expectancy

    Japan on the other hand spends little, is low on the left,, yet their line shoots up to the right hand side for a high life expectancy.

    It's hardly manipulated, check, google, any graph on life expectancy over healthcare costs and you'll find pretty much the same thing regardless of source or country of graph origin.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 11:24 PM GMT
    Actually, this is a brilliant infographic. It takes a lot of complex data (three sets of data in all) and presents in a visual that makes a single, simple point: Healthcare in this country is unnecessarily expensive.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 11:37 PM GMT
    The intersecting lines running all over just look unnecessarily messy to me... A bar graph (with lines of varying thickness just like in this diagram) could have been used to demonstrate all three sets of data without requiring one to trace lines all over. But that's just my opinion.
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    Jan 18, 2010 8:14 PM GMT
    skifan08 saidThe intersecting lines running all over just look unnecessarily messy to me... A bar graph (with lines of varying thickness just like in this diagram) could have been used to demonstrate all three sets of data without requiring one to trace lines all over. But that's just my opinion.



    You're not expected to see all the details, just the obvious trend. It's illustrating data, not providing a spreadsheet.

  • Sebastian18

    Posts: 255

    Jan 18, 2010 8:17 PM GMT
    davepalen saidThere are a variety of stats that can be manipulated. It seems logical to me that medical care provided by the private sector is superior than anything from the government. Try going to the postal service vs. UPS or Federal Express. If we are concerned about HIV drugs, from what country are new developments coming from? The USA leads the way. Fuck it up with Obamacare crap and let's see what we have ten years from now.


    Actually, France almost leads the way against America in development of new treatments. Just sayin'.
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Jan 23, 2010 4:47 PM GMT
    Does it take into account differing lifestyles? The lifestyle of the typical Japanese is much different than that of the average American.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 24, 2010 2:00 AM GMT
    Cultural diet, exercise and access to healthcare are taken into account in these studies.
    Since the Canadian diet and lifestyle are virtually the same as in the US the only key difference is access to healthcare and Canadians living longer than Americans.
  • metta

    Posts: 39104

    Feb 06, 2010 12:56 AM GMT


    I guess that this means that the chart will just get worse and worse for us. Thank you Scrotum Lickers! icon_sad.gif


    [quote]
    Anthem Blue Cross dramatically raising rates for Californians with individual health policies

    Policyholders are incensed over rate hikes of as much as 39%, which they say come on top of similar increases last year. State insurance regulators say they'll investigate.

    Anthem Blue Cross is telling many of its approximately 800,000 customers who buy individual coverage -- people not covered by group rates -- that its prices will go up March 1 and may be adjusted "more frequently" than its typical yearly increases.


    [/quote]

    [quote]
    "I've never seen anything like this," said Mark Weiss, 63, a Century City podiatrist whose Anthem policy for himself and his wife will rise 35%. The couple's annual insurance bill will jump to $27,336 from $20,184.
    [/quote]


    [quote]
    That's when Mary Feller of San Rafael learned that the rate for herself and her husband will jump 39%, or $465 a month, driving the couple's annual premium to $19,896 from $14,316.

    Feller, 56, said the premium for her 26-year-old daughter also will rise 38%, costing the family an additional $1,572 a year.

    As a result, starting March 1, the Fellers' health insurance bill will surpass the family's monthly mortgage payment on their home north of San Francisco.
    [/quote]

    [quote]
    Broker and insurance industry analysts said the California rate increases will leave individual policyholders with few good options: Anthem subscribers such as the Fellers can switch to a company plan with a higher deductible. Or they can try to switch insurers, a dicey proposition because carriers in the individual market can reject applicants who have preexisting medical conditions.

    "It's putting people's backs up against the wall," said Shana Alex Lavarreda, director of health insurance studies at the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. "They are finding new ways to create new problems for consumers."
    [/quote]

    http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-insure-anthem5-2010feb05,0,3002094.story