Employees

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 6:09 PM GMT
    I took a supervisor position a couple of months ago, and have just been noticing a trend in some employees. My best friend is a store manager, and he says the same thing.

    Why does it seem so hard to get people to come to work on time (I understand life happens, but every day?), do what is clearly outlined for you, and to return from breaks on time? And then there are the employees that feel entitled because they have tenure.
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    Jan 16, 2010 7:44 PM GMT
    Maybe your employees don't see the importance of being on time. Are they paid hourly or salary? If you start deducting late minutes from their paychecks, I'm sure they'll get the hint.
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    Jan 16, 2010 8:10 PM GMT
    I hear you on that!! But how about when they bitch they dont get enough hours, only to call in or ask someone else to work it becuase they have other things to do!!!
  • jgymnast733

    Posts: 1783

    Jan 16, 2010 9:00 PM GMT
    Their priorities are elsewhere...icon_exclaim.gif or maybe they just dont give a damn.....
    I'v had my share of working with lazy unproductive people who could care less about someone else having to pick up the slack because of their lateness, THANK GOD I DONT WORK WITH THEM ANYMOREicon_exclaim.gificon_exclaim.gificon_exclaim.gif
    I feel so blessed working for the company i'm at now, we work as a well oiled team and if someone is delayed getting to work the boss pitches in to assist if needed....I love working with these guys....
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    You are indeed lucky, JGymnast.

    They are paid hourly. My job shouldn't have to offer an incentive for you to come to work.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:18 PM GMT
    I assume you're in retail or some other sector where being on time is critical. Perhaps you can institute a system where those who are already their cannot leave until their replacement arrives. This will have your workers police each other, rather than you're having to do it. If that doesn't work, I would definitely look into docking pay for tardiness.
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:24 PM GMT
    I have 27 subordinates at my location. You must use a stiff hand with slackers. Warn them once, discharge them next. If you do it once for tardiness, the rest will fall in line. icon_wink.gif Trust me.
    (I just recently discharged some warehouse person for wearing pants inappropriately low. I warned him once. Now he is out of work for a long time to come I'm sure.) Yet the rest of the warehouse people smartened up in all aspects of their duties!
    Do not tolerate slackers! When one does it, it will spread.
    Cheers,
    Keith
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:29 PM GMT
    Musclequest saidI have 27 subordinates at my location. You must use a stiff hand with slackers. Warn them once, discharge them next. If you do it once for tardiness, the rest will fall in line. icon_wink.gif Trust me.
    (I just recently discharged some warehouse person for wearing pants inappropriately low. I warned him once. Now he is out of work for a long time to come I'm sure. Yet the rest of the warehouse people smartened up in all aspects of their duties!
    Do not tolerate slackers! When one does it, it will spread.
    Cheers,
    Keith
    icon_twisted.gif


    You fired someone for wearing low-slung pants while working in a factory?

    Overreact much? icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:33 PM GMT
    Christian73 said
    Musclequest saidI have 27 subordinates at my location. You must use a stiff hand with slackers. Warn them once, discharge them next. If you do it once for tardiness, the rest will fall in line. icon_wink.gif Trust me.
    (I just recently discharged some warehouse person for wearing pants inappropriately low. I warned him once. Now he is out of work for a long time to come I'm sure. Yet the rest of the warehouse people smartened up in all aspects of their duties!
    Do not tolerate slackers! When one does it, it will spread.
    Cheers,
    Keith
    icon_twisted.gif


    You fired someone for wearing low-slung pants while working in a factory?

    Overreact much? icon_rolleyes.gif

    Not at all. There is a dress code policy that ALL must follow. He was warned once. (And it's not a factory. It's a warhouse.) That thuggish look has no place anywhere. Especially at a place of work where there is a dress code.
    -Keith
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  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:36 PM GMT
    I was always that employee that was afraid to not show up 15 minutes early.

    I'm very punctual, especially when I could get fired for my crap timing. x.x I stress so much about being on time sometimes it's sad.
  • jgymnast733

    Posts: 1783

    Jan 16, 2010 10:46 PM GMT
    Balljunkie saidYou are indeed lucky, JGymnast.

    They are paid hourly. My job shouldn't have to offer an incentive for you to come to work.


    My boss appreciates how we get the job done as a team,afterall,,the process we had to go through to get into this company was tough,this company has a way of hiring very talented people with the IT factor and it seems to work....
    The company treats us to dinner/coctails to some of the best restaurants in manhattan as well as broadway shows, like i said before,,I LOVE THESE GUYS.........icon_wink.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 10:56 PM GMT
    I agree. I managed a department of 10 guys. Some who were much older and more experience. That's great... By showing that you can do the job in 15 minutes less does not contribute to the team accomplishing their goals.

    Set department meetings first thing in the morning. And make it a point that you will not start until everyone is in the meeting. You may have someone in your group that it will just blow their mind if they have to sit idle for another 5 minutes while they wait for their co-workers to show up.

    Yes, sometimes it is difficult to get to work on time once and a while, traffic accident, etc.. but continuously. If it keeps evolving, you may need to contact HR. Show them the employee handbook, remind them that they have signed something reading that they understood what was in the handbook. If they need a new copy, get them one. Have them sign again, and inform them that is their warning.

    Let the team self manage and self police.

    I heard the greatest analogy from a friend that passed away not too long ago.

    Managing is like Kindergarten with ash-trays. SHE WAS SO RIGHT!.
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    Jan 16, 2010 11:28 PM GMT
    Musclequest saidI have 27 subordinates at my location. You must use a stiff hand with slackers. Warn them once, discharge them next. If you do it once for tardiness, the rest will fall in line. icon_wink.gif Trust me.
    (I just recently discharged some warehouse person for wearing pants inappropriately low. I warned him once. Now he is out of work for a long time to come I'm sure.) Yet the rest of the warehouse people smartened up in all aspects of their duties!
    Do not tolerate slackers! When one does it, it will spread.
    Cheers,
    Keith
    icon_twisted.gif


    Now, if we could just set expectations about fat kids (not being) it would go a long way to improve our national health.

    Folks, sadly, especially in urban areas, and especially with single, and bad, parents, that don't have expectations set upon them can be challenges to both work with and to supervise.

    I'm empathetic, to a degree, about urban commutes. Here in Dallas, a 12 mile journey can take from ten minutes to 2 hours (literally). We have to improve our work processes, and how we move about.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 16, 2010 11:44 PM GMT
    Fire your biggest offender as an example... Machiavelli would be proud.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2010 1:26 AM GMT
    It isn't retail, but a company under Medicaid. The sad part is that so many of the people work on Medicaid, and yet do not take their jobs seriously.

    We are working to get the slackers out. Thanks for the advice.
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Jan 17, 2010 1:42 AM GMT
    My experience as a job seeker has been that the ONLY thing employers care about is that you have had 3-5 years experience doing the kind of work for which you are applying. I could never understand that. My feeling is that showing up, showing up on time, and being willing to work when you get there, is more important than anything else.

    I went to school to learn how to do the job, but nobody hires entry level employees.
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    Jan 17, 2010 1:45 AM GMT
    Webster666 said

    I went to school to learn how to do the job, but nobody hires entry level employees.


    Yes, I'm experienceing the same thing right now
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    Jan 17, 2010 1:57 AM GMT
    TheIStrat said
    Webster666 said

    I went to school to learn how to do the job, but nobody hires entry level employees.


    Yes, I'm experienceing the same thing right now


    yep