After pulling a muscle?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 17, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    I love to run!

    Somehow I pulled/tore a muscle in my lower back last Saturday to a point where I could not stand up AT ALL. Since then I have gone to the doctor and he put me on a steroid, muscle relaxant, and lovely little pain meds. I was able to run a little yesterday a little on what I suppose would be a inclined, high knees, eliptical machine. I have been running every day(and I do mean every day) for at least 3 months before this incident and I was wondering when a comfortable time would be to start back on my regular regiment.

    Messing up my back had nothing to do with the running and I felt amazing after the running but I was just wondering how much wear and tear goes on with the muscles in your lower back while running. I don't want to mess it up any more and want to know if the euphoria I am feeling is due to the mix of pain meds and running endorphin's that are disguising the pain or if just after a week it is ok to get back on the horse.

    I only take the pain meds when I wake up around 9am to get me up and moving and then before bed because I can be quite the insomniac.

    Also if it helps on specifying the area it is in the lower left side of my back. I assumed it was just a sciatic nerve issue but it would be in that area.
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    Jan 17, 2010 8:07 PM GMT
    Rest.

    There are various TYPES of steroids. Likely, you were put on an catabolic steroid like cortisone, which lowers inflammation but can cause tissue to degenerate. You need to be careful with it.

    Running is a high impact exercise and lots of folks suffer when doing it. You may need to perform something else, say, rowing, for a while, that's not high impact. Most experienced runners have lots of injuries due to impact. If you run long enough, you WILL have problems.
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    Jan 17, 2010 8:28 PM GMT
    Also, under instruction from your doctor, begin some physical therapy to keep your back muscles in shape. If you don't keep your muscles strengthened you will end up hurting yourself again. I was thrown in a kung fu class and landed stupidly and ended up hurting my back. It hurt to do anything, but after three days of PT, I felt immensely better. Just don't over do it.

    Good luck!
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Jan 17, 2010 8:33 PM GMT
    HungGarSig saidAlso, under instruction from your doctor, begin some physical therapy to keep your back muscles in shape. If you don't keep your muscles strengthened you will end up hurting yourself again. I was thrown in a kung fu class and landed stupidly and ended up hurting my back. It hurt to do anything, but after three days of PT, I felt immensely better. Just don't over do it.

    Good luck!


    If you spell the second part of your name backwards, it says "Hung Gis Rag."
  • toybrian

    Posts: 395

    Jan 17, 2010 10:22 PM GMT
    Poe, take you time getting back to the seven day runs and work your way up slowly or could do more permanet damage and then knock out running altogether...Love to run here but listen to my body about when to relax and when to push..do not feel bad about taking a day or two off..run competitively and enjoy it when I run..so free and gives my mind a chance to relax also and stop worrying about anything for a while..it will be there when I am done running....good luck to you and hope all is well soon with you..nice weather coming soon to be oputside more..
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    Jan 17, 2010 10:52 PM GMT
    I'd suggest, contrary to everyone else, to run like mad on a treadmill, max elevation and slant, high knee running.

    Things will resolve after that, trust me. icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 17, 2010 11:46 PM GMT
    Running results in enormous stress on the spine. The constant pounding of the feet causes shock waves to be transmitted to the spine and hips.

    Sciatica results when the sciatic nerve is compressed. Sciatica causes pain in the buttocks which can follow the sciatic nerve down the back of the leg. Muscle weakness can occur, and the reflexes in the knee and ankle can be lost. Pain in the low back is due to muscle spasm. The muscle spasm is preventing you from standing up normally. You can have low back spasms with or without sciatica. Although uncommon, you can have sciatica without low back spasms.

    Corticosteroids can be used to reduce the inflammation from a herniated disk. The most commonly used steroid is Medrol (methylprednisolone).

    Acute low back pain is no longer treated with bed rest. It is better to keep active, but certainly you need to avoid activities that worsen the pain.

    When you return to running, depends on what caused the injury and how severe the injury is. The treating physician needs to decide this,

    Running up hills places more strain on the back than running on the level.
    Anatomical problems may contribute to back pain while running. The common ones being over pronation of the feet and unequal leg length.

    When the injury is healed, it is necessary to develop strong core musculature. A strong core takes the strain off the vertebral column and the disks. Strong hip musculature is also necessary ( such as the externsors, abductors, and external rotators). Flexible hamstrings are also important in the prevention of back pain.
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    Feb 03, 2010 5:40 AM GMT
    Wow, I must applaud you FirstKnight. If only you could be here to massage my lower back while you explained that too me I would have paid you instead of the doctor.

    I am up and running like there is no tomorrow again, thanks for the help guys.