Iron Deficieny Anemia

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 5:45 PM GMT
    So after my long run I went out to diligently perform my medicine ball squat thrust with wall rebound and I just about collapsed to the ground! After being vegetarian for a year I am starting to feel like I'm floating in a cloud of fatigue! I haven't got a blood test yet, but I'm totally paranoid about my iron and B12 intake now. I spent all last night looking on the web and through my vegan triathlete nutrition bible and came up with a monster shopping list of foods rich in precious ferrum, atomic number 26....

    pumpkin seeds, dark leafy greens (spinach and kale), garbanzo and various beans, fortified whole grains, lentils, oatmeal, egg yolks, cheese, sea vegetables, tofu etc. Consume with vitamin C to increase absorption!

    I'm going to eat all this and then go for my blood test. I want to get an A! Maybe I will actually pick up an iron skillet, but I never really cook in a pan. Besides heat will just destroy the iron in my food!

    I saw that clams are VERY rich in iron, perhaps I will give into the flesh....I have already painstakingly eaten enough raw spinach and kale! Any advice other than "swallowing"?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 6:28 PM GMT
    Uh... your problem should be pretty obvious: you're vegetarian!

    Go get yourself a big, bloody roast, and cook the shit outta that fucker with a bunch of taters and carrots. Eat as much as that as you can; there's 5.5mg of iron per 100g of meat. Most of your iron intake ends up coming from meat as it is, even if it's "absorbed better from raw foods". Let's face it, 100g of spinach is a lot of fuckin' spinach.

    Your other option is to eat a lot of beans and lentils. Basically do a "beans and rice" diet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 6:31 PM GMT
    LOL. You tell em' flex89. :-)

    Meat is the answer.

    Get on a multi-vitamin, too.

    Moo. Moo. Moo.

    Understand man was designed to run fast for a short period of time, gather up, gobble down, protein. Chickens, fish, COWS, PIGS, deer, sheep, anything with meat in it....stuff like that.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 6:48 PM GMT
    Range fed beef if you have money, and it suits you. It's a bit tougher, and less meaty, but, a bit less fat in some cases, although, not most.

    Most corn fed beef is fairly lean in the right cuts.

    It's really hard to get enough nutrition from just a plant-based diet.

    Sea food is a great choice. Lean, lots of protein, and good fats.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 7:03 PM GMT
    Anemia is not the only cause of fatigue. There are multiple causes both physical and mental. In the USA, the most common causes of fatigue is mental. The causes can be depression, chronic anxiety, seasonal affective disorder, excess caffeine, stress, over work, job burn out and so forth. Excessive exercising without giving your body time to recover can result in over training . Fatigue is one of the symptoms of over training. It is good to check with a physician. He can rule out medical problems that can cause fatigue such as under-active thyroid, diabetes, liver and kidney disease. If a cause can not be found after every disease is ruled out, the person gets tagged with the term chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Off topic, but a retrovirus ( yes, HIV is also a retrovirus) is the latest explanation for chronic fatigue syndrome.
    http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/48157/title/Retrovirus_might_be_culprit_in_chronic_fatigue_syndrome

    Recent studies have shown that B12 and Iron deficiency anemia are not more common in vegetarians than in meat eaters. This contrasts with older studiesicon_confused.gif

    As you mention vitamin C is excellent for improving Iron absorption. Physicians recommend it to their patients.

    Other than for soy, plant protein tends to be incomplete. Animal protein is complete. An incomplete protein lacks an essential amino acid. If you eat a wide variety of plant foods you will not become deficient in an essential amino acid.

    Avoid tea, coffee and calcium supplements when eating iron-rich foods if you are trying to increase the iron in your blood. These reduce iron absorption, so take them several hours before or after you consume an iron-rich food

    A male should not take iron supplements unless he is definitely shown to be iron deficient by lab testing. Males can develop iron poisoning and iron overload from supplements. It is okay for women to take iron supplements because of iron lose from menstruation and child birth.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 7:08 PM GMT
    Shit. Fatigue can be caused by all sorts of stuff, including a crappy diet with a lack of calories, or a lack of sleep.

    To really know, you need to do blood work.
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Jan 21, 2010 7:09 PM GMT
    trailxtreme saidI don't have time to sit at a trough munching on grass and beans all day. Perhaps it is time for grass fed, free range, beer massaged, organic, BEEF! Not just for the iron, but maybe the protein and deliciousness as well...every now and then couldn't hurt icon_twisted.gif


    C'mon! Don't believe the hype! I've been vegetarian for almost twenty years and I have never felt fatigued because of my diet. Actually, I switched to being a vegetarian because I don't get fatigued and lethargic after a meal of rotting flesh. Plus, I don't want to get mad cow, which seems to be infecting many RJ members lately!

    Luckily, some of my favorite foods are loaded with iron, like eggs, peanuts, leefy greens, etc. Becoming a vegetarian was one of the best things I have done for my body, proof positive.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 21, 2010 8:25 PM GMT
    trailxtreme said Runner's world talks a lot about how the act of running depletes iron more than other endurance sports because of all the pounding.


    There is even a medical term for the problem, foot strike hemolysis. The red cells are fragmented by the pounding of feet on a hard surface. The iron is lost in the urine. Hemolysis is just the medical term for destruction of red blood cells. When mechanical heart valves fragment red cells, medical residents refer to the problem as the "Waring Blender Effect".

    In addition to destruction or red cells in the feet long distance runners have additional reasons to have low iron levels
    http://pfitzinger.com/labreports/iron.shtml
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jan 21, 2010 8:46 PM GMT
    blood test is key, NOW, not before you are already eating 'better'.

    veg/vegan diets(balanced&spot on) are fine for a normal person, working out 0-6hrs a week, if anymore, you definitely need animal protein at least 1-3x a week. liver and onions are great. if you are an elite athlete training 15+hrs, you will be less injured as well, compared the veggie athletes.

    and soy is not a great source of protein, especially for men. soy, unless it's forminted or tofu, is it bio available. soy milk and soy products are 'processed' crap.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Jan 24, 2010 4:23 AM GMT
    Celticmusl said
    trailxtreme saidI don't have time to sit at a trough munching on grass and beans all day. Perhaps it is time for grass fed, free range, beer massaged, organic, BEEF! Not just for the iron, but maybe the protein and deliciousness as well...every now and then couldn't hurt icon_twisted.gif


    C'mon! Don't believe the hype! I've been vegetarian for almost twenty years and I have never felt fatigued because of my diet. Actually, I switched to being a vegetarian because I don't get fatigued and lethargic after a meal of rotting flesh. Plus, I don't want to get mad cow, which seems to be infecting many RJ members lately!

    Luckily, some of my favorite foods are loaded with iron, like eggs, peanuts, leefy greens, etc. Becoming a vegetarian was one of the best things I have done for my body, proof positive.


    I don't get it. Does that mean the vegetables you eat aren't rotting at a comparable rate as you eat them? Also, just because vegetables can't whimper and don't bleed red when you kill/eat them doesn't mean they enjoy it anymore than animals do. o__0



    Good luck with the marathon!
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Jan 24, 2010 4:20 PM GMT
    http://www.bewellbuzz.com/forum/mineralization/

    really good info for veggies looking for iron sources.

    i'm loving Cirku www.cirkupro.com
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Mar 15, 2010 6:39 AM GMT
    Vitamins are a group of organic food substances or nutrients found only in living things, plants and animals.
    Vitamins are divided into two classes based on their solubility. The the fat-soluble vitamins include vitamin D, vitamin E, vitamin A, and vitamin K. The water-soluble vitamins are folate (folic acid), vitamin B12, biotin, vitamin B6, niacin, thiamin, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, and vitamin C (ascorbic acid). Fat-soluble vitamins contain only carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen while water-soluble vitamins contain these three elements plus nitrogen and some-times sulfur. Fat-soluble vitamins can be stored in appreciable amounts in the body and the water-soluble vitamins cannot be stored in the body.

    Vitamins are necessary in small amounts for normal metabolism and good health. Vitamins and minerals have no calories and are not an energy source, but assist in metabolizing nutrients in food and are invaluable in keeping your body running smoothly. Vitamins make it possible for other nutrients to be digested, absorbed and metabolized by the body. Vitamins are sometimes referred to as the "spark plugs" of our human machine. They are required to do many things and their excess or depletion can lead to acute and chronic disease.