BSG prequel, "Caprica," to feature gay and bisexual main characters

  • ValleyGuy5000

    Posts: 28

    Jan 23, 2010 2:50 AM GMT
    Battlestar Galactica Prequel Caprica Goes Where Star Trek Didn't

    For gay viewers and especially for gay fans of science fiction, Caprica offers something special in the form of Sam Adama (Sasha Roiz), the brother of Joseph. Sam is special because for all of the talk of science fiction's progressive thinking and social relevance, nearly all science fiction series — most notably Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica itself — have failed miserably when it comes to gay inclusion. Only the UK's Torchwood has featured gay and bisexual characters and storylines in any meaningful way.

    FULL ARTICLE at http://www.afterelton.com/TV/2010/01/caprica-review?page=0%2C1 ... or text pasted below with a couple of images. http://www.syfy.com/caprica for more information.
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    Review: "Caprica" Goes Where "Star Trek" Didn't
    by Michael Jensen, Editor
    January 21, 2010

    Warning! This review reveals the identity of the gay and bisexual characters on Caprica as well as several minor plot points.

    If Ronald D. Moore set himself a difficult task back in the early Aughts — reimagining the somewhat beloved if campy 1970s sci fi series Battlestar Galactica as a much darker, much more socially relevant sci fi series — then what he is attempting to do with his new show Caprica is something supremely more difficult.

    This time out he's not just writing and producing a prequel (almost always a risky proposition) to his wildly successful and infinitely more loved version of Battlestar Galactica, he's also using his new drama to help SyFy achieve their goal of broadening their demographic appeal by making Caprica what is being called "television's first science fiction family saga" and which Caprica executive producer Remi Aubuchon said "...owes itself more to Dallas in some ways than to Star Trek."

    For many hardcore fans of BSG, those aren't exactly words to instill confidence.

    But all involved have stated confidently that while viewers new to the BSG universe will have no trouble getting into world of Caprica (set 58 years before the events of BSG), fans of Moore's BSG will also find plenty of the science fiction and moral complexity that drove the original series.

    Have they succeeded? After watching the first four hours of Caprica, and being very much a fan of Moore's reimagining of BSG (if not obsessed with it), I would say yes.

    sashasina.JPG

    While I personally miss the deep space setting of BSG, the prequel offers enough futuristic cityscapes and advanced technology that viewers will likely never forget they are watching a science fiction program and not, well, Dallas.

    And the show's driving storyline — how one man accidentally created intelligent machines he calls "Cylons," and how those Cylons came to hate their human overlords enough to try and annihilate them — is about as science fiction-y as one gets.

    As for how the show fares as a "science fiction family saga" — the emphasis here being on "family saga" — that aspect works as well, though it will take time for viewers to develop the sort of attachment to the characters that keeps fans coming back to such dramas.

    But the pieces are all in place for a compelling drama. On one side, you have the Graystones headed by Daniel Graystone (Eric Stoltz), an industrial titan made wealthy by the technology that allows the first steps to be taken toward the creation of the Cylons.

    On the other side are the Adamas headed by Joseph Adama (Esai Morales), a middle class family originally from the planet Tauron (there are twelve planets that make up the Twelve Colonies of which Caprica is the preeminent). Analogous to the Irish and Italian immigrants of early 19th century America, Taurons are looked down upon by Capricans, considered to be racially "inferior"and subject to much scorn.

    The Graystones and the Adamas are inadvertently brought together when a terrorist attack kills family members from each clan and the connections forged from that common tragedy fuel much of the plot of the series, as does the technology that might allow them to bring their loved ones back to life — at least sort of.

    It's certainly not a bad set-up on which to hang one's show.

    For gay viewers and especially for gay fans of science fiction, Caprica offers something special in the form of Sam Adama (Sasha Roiz), the brother of Joseph. Sam is special because for all of the talk of science fiction's progressive thinking and social relevance, nearly all science fiction series — most notably Star Trek and Battlestar Galactica itself — have failed miserably when it comes to gay inclusion. Only the UK's Torchwood has featured gay and bisexual characters and storylines in any meaningful way.

    Sam is a member of a Tauron organization known as the Halatha Crime Syndicate (think the Italian mob) and where Joseph has chosen to try to integrate into Caprican society, Sam is defiantly anti-assimilationist.

    As part of his Halatha duties, Sam is an "enforcer" who provides the "muscle," up to and including killing people when necessary. Sam is also a gay man happily married to another man, something completely a non-issue in Caprican society.

    The show also treats the gay aspect as unimportant and viewers learn that particular piece of information during a conversation between Sam and Willy, his eleven-year-old nephew and Joseph's son. It was an interesting and pointed reveal by the show's creators; by having that information come up during a conversation between Sam and Willy in a completely matter-of-fact way, the show communicated that sexual orientation is a non-issue here — and should be for viewers as well.

    By treating the information so casually, and by giving Sam a happy home life with his husband, the show also avoids the pitfall of creating yet another gay "villain" who is made more sinister by his homosexuality. That aspect was worrisome as the two hour premiere also includes several scenes in a virtual, hedonistic nightclub where viewers twice witness two scantily clad women kissing, typical television shorthand used to communicate that something is especially salacious.

    As played by Roiz (who is top notch here), Sam is a multi-layered, complex character who is believeable both as the Halatha muscle and as Willy's caring if unconventional uncle. Roiz conveys the ruthlessness necessary for Sam to be a killer, but also makes him a man who kills for very specific moral reasons and is not a monster who has no ethical code.

    The show also includes a bisexual female character — Sister Clarice Willow (Polly Walker) — who is in a group marriage and comes across with a potentially menacing air. (And if she does in fact turn out to be "bad," then the character will be yet another long line of evil bisexual women in television and the movies.)

    samclaricecomp.jpg

    Having a show with two queer characters who are morally dubious could be a potentially troubling issue except for two things — all of the characters here are morally dubious at times and in subsequent episodes, Sam is going to become more and more of a positive father figure to Willy, a very atypical relationship for television to portray.

    So after the first four hours, we are left with a gay character that most viewers will find as complicated, as compromise
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 23, 2010 4:36 AM GMT
    I just watched the pilot on netflix. Sam is damned yummy and I'm not going to question why he needs to be shirtless when he is cutting throats. It's interesting they chose to go the ultra violent hyper masculine route with his character.

    BSG did give us a bi character, Felix Gaeta. However, his relationship with Hoshi was barely mentioned in the web shorts and completely ignored in the actual show. There was a moment of meaningful eye contact between them when Felix took over the command center during the mutiny, but that was about it. Hoshi's reaction to his bf's mutiny and subsequent execution isn't even touched upon.
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    Jan 23, 2010 4:48 AM GMT
    Also, on BSG "Razor", it was implied that Admiral Cain had a relationship with "Gina" (Cylon/6) aboard the Pegasus…of course that was before the Admiral found out Gina was a Cylon and ordered her interrogation & torture. Talk about a woman scorned...
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    Jan 23, 2010 4:49 AM GMT
    BigmanC03 saidAlso, on BSG "Razor", it was implied that Admiral Cain had a relationship with "Gina" (Cylon/6) aboard the Pegasus…of course that was before the Admiral found out Gina was a Cylon and ordered her interrogation & torture. Talk about a woman scorned...



    Ooops, I forgot about that. Cain was a big 'ol toaster licker! Thanks for reminding me...lol
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Jan 23, 2010 5:44 AM GMT
    Star Trek tv shows didn't have a main human gay character but they did have episodes with same-sex attraction between characters in single episodes and across story arcs and also plots that were obviously drawn from gay-type struggles.
  • ValleyGuy5000

    Posts: 28

    Feb 15, 2010 5:16 AM GMT
    Sister Clarice's bisexual group marriage should be an interesting exploration. At least one of her husbands, Nestor, is fun to watch. LOL.

    The show has a lot of potential... can't wait to see where it all goes. It's pretty richly textured.
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    Mar 18, 2010 5:56 AM GMT
    ValleyGuy5000 saidSister Clarice's bisexual group marriage should be an interesting exploration. At least one of her husbands, Nestor, is fun to watch. LOL.

    The show has a lot of potential... can't wait to see where it all goes. It's pretty richly textured.


    While many gay-themed works are created by straight writers, the Cast Full Of Gay is almost always created by gay or bisexual writers (at least in Western works). As such, testking a+ it will generally have a wider variety of Queer As Tropes instead of pigeonholing the characters into one particular stereotype, ccna certification sometimes making the characters into sort of a gay Six Student Clique or Five Token Band. The few token straight characters that appear will usually be fag hags, dyke tykes, or family members of the main characters. ccnp Interestingly, the mortality rate of gay characters tends to drop significantly in cases where most of the cast is gay, ccsp while the chance of a Happy Ending increases. This can also be attributed to the fact the writers are usually gay themselves.