Organic or non-organic at the grocery store???

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    Jan 12, 2008 1:17 AM GMT
    I work part time at a grocery store while going to school and impressed with the amount of organic foods that we sell, esp. in the natural foods department. So do you drop the extra few bucks to buy the organic or natural foods compared to non organic??/
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    Jan 12, 2008 1:42 AM GMT
    No, not the extra few bucks....an extra lotta bucks....but I still drop 'em. American food at teh regular supermarket is processed til it is devoid of nutrients, or poisoned with pesticides or, in the case of meats, shot up with antibiotics and growth hormones.
  • HndsmKansan

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    Jan 12, 2008 3:46 AM GMT
    I agree, Dillons has some great organic stuff, especially at the new Dillions, "Marketplace" where I shop. Its huge.
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    Jan 12, 2008 4:18 AM GMT
    It can be, but no the organics. You'll pay quite a little more to have the organics. Just depends if you buy what is in season.
  • Deano963

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    Jan 12, 2008 4:18 AM GMT
    Organic is all well and good, but you should really be much more concerned with buying local produce rather than organic. Now, in your case, you work at a grocery store so I am sure you do all your shopping there b/c you likely receive a good discount, but for everyone else, you should know that the average bite of food in this country travels 2,500 miles before it reaches your mouth. Think about how much gas is being burned (and therefore all the pollution and greenhouse gases that come with it) by how far we ship all the food we eat in this country. And, food that is not local is much more likely to be grown on giant, corporate, foreign-owned farms that create a LOT of pollution, contaminate local drinking water supplies, practice unsustainable farming practices, and employ migrant workers for sub-minimum wage pay that they basically treat like slaves - because they can. This is getting to be a big problem in states like Ohio.

    Locally-grown produce like you find at your local Farmer's Market, on the other hand, is almost always grown on a family-owned farm by umpteenth-generation farmers who practice sustainable farming methods, and the produce is also likely to be organic anyways. And, that way you are supporting your local economy instead of some farm in another state or worse, some huge foreign-owned agribusiness that undoubtedly uses massives amounts of pesticides and fertilizers. Produce at the local Farmer's Market is usually a bit more expensive than you can find it at a big grocery store, but it is always much fresher as well, as the farmers likely harvested the produce they are selling that very morning or the day before.

    Local - Best

    Organic - Good

    Non-organic and non-local - Bad and Very Bad
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    Jan 12, 2008 4:40 AM GMT
    Something that really gets me about the "high" price of organic food....

    people will pay all sorts of money on this or that, but FOOD that they need for health and survival, they dont want to pay for.

    I think our priorities for cost are a bit out of wack. Food shouldnt be bought at lowest cost and shouldnt be bought with the money that is left over in our budgets.

    It is better for everyone to put their money in better quality food...you will feel better, live longer, earn longer, and get a far better return on your "investiment" in better quality food.
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    Jan 12, 2008 4:54 AM GMT
    Deano963... I completely agree with you about buying local. The problem in my area is that "locally grown" isn't usually identified as such in the stores, so I end up buying what's there and hoping it was locally grown. When I was living back home in NC, it was always prominently marked as local and I would always buy that for the environmental reasons you stated and because it was almost always half the price.

    If my budget allows, I always buy organic (and if I could find locally grown organic, that would just be awesome). However, my budget usually doesn't allow me to go for the organic stuff... or at least, not much of it. I know why its more expensive, but it still pisses me off. I do, however, frequent the local farmer's markets during the growing season for most of my produce.

    Even with processed foods, the healthier they are, the more they cost. Some of that actually never made sense to me... for example... if you normally make crackers with salt on them, it costs x amount of money to make them. If you make the very same crackers with the same recipe, but leave off the salt, it costs less to make them because you save the cost of that salt... yet they sell them for a higher price. icon_confused.gif Ah, the wonders of retail...
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:00 AM GMT
    Caslon saidSomething that really gets me about the "high" price of organic food....

    people will pay all sorts of money on this or that, but FOOD that they need for health and survival, they dont want to pay for.

    I think our priorities for cost are a bit out of wack. Food shouldnt be bought at lowest cost and shouldnt be bought with the money that is left over in our budgets.

    It is better for everyone to put their money in better quality food...you will feel better, live longer, earn longer, and get a far better return on your "investiment" in better quality food.

    I see your point and I agree to a point... However, in some cases, like mine, I don't make much money to start with. Out of that I have to pay rent, utilities, bus fare to work, and hopefully have some left over for other things I really need like toiletries, groceries, and the occasional new pair of pants for work. So its not always a matter of choosing to spend all sorts of money on trivial things... sometimes its a matter of making the best out of what you have available in order to survive. Hopefully I'll find a way to afford to go back to school and get into a better paying career... but I'm still working on that...
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:02 AM GMT
    I too try to by from local producers/farmers, BUTTTT when it comes to "organics" in the gocery store, I do not believe or trust that all the "organic" is actually "organic". With the over-inflated prices - I will wait until the mainstream consumers are all buying the " organic" then the high prices may drop to a resonable market value.icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:07 AM GMT
    Well I know where I work at the organic items are organic at least at my end, the boxes are all labeled and we have to take extra care to make sure that we relabeled the produce. OF course this isn't all the same at all stores.
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:10 AM GMT
    I have to disagree about one point...

    Organic = Best

    Local = Good

    I work for Tree of Life which is one of the top Natural and Organic Food distributors. I help develope our private label natural & organic food items so you learn a few things doing that.

    Although you should always try to buy local over grocery store produce, you should also be aware that the family farmers at your local farmer's market are not regulated by anybody so they can pretty much use any chemicals on their produce they want. Now, granted most stick to good ole' farming practices as stated by another post, but you never know unless you ask questions. I'm lucky enough that in St. Augustine we have a farmer's market with an organic produce stand. If you're not so lucky, I would still recommend going to your local farmer's market but ask questions and try to make sure you are buying from a respectable farmer who practices good farming techniques. If that don't work, I would pay the extra money to get organic produce from my local supermarket.

    -Den
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:10 AM GMT
    gettoknowit saidThe materials used and expenses of the ingredients to make a food product shouldn't have anything to do with their quality in terms of meeting health standards.

    Yes, but I'm not talking about quality. Here's an illustration of my point...

    You make crackers. It costs you, the manufacturer, $1 per box to make them, and you sell them for $2 a box. You also make the very same crackers but without salt, which costs you 50 cents per box to make. Where, then, is the logic in selling them for $3 a box, when the crackers that cost twice as much to make sell for less?

    The point is that companies that do this charge the consumer more money to leave out ingredients, which is totally illogical.

    But this is getting off topic...
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:14 AM GMT
    gettoknowit saidlogic has nothing to do with math, numbers are to algebra as health is to compassion.

    Wow, dude... that's deep... abstract but deep... icon_lol.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:15 AM GMT
    I shop at My Organic Market.

    They post when an item is locally grown and organic.

    A local grower can still spray a crop with insecticide or shoot up his livestock with antibiotics and growth hormone and feed it some kind of mix for feed. That isnt any good.
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    Jan 12, 2008 5:20 AM GMT
    If you're really interested in going local, click on the link below and type in your zip code:

    http://www.localharvest.org/csa/

    Chances are pretty good that there's a local farm nearby that you can support through CSA: Community Supported Agriculture. My partner and I purchase a share each year in our local farm, Green Cay Farms. They are not certified organic, but they practice organic methods and sustainable farming. We get 2 deliveries each month at our front door, and the deal is we share in the farm's abundance and also in the farm's misfortunes... so when things are good (like now... and most of the time) we get boxes chock full of great things, and when things are bad (like after Hurricane Wilma) well, the boxes can be pretty empty for a few weeks. But we're supporting local farmers practicing methods that we feel good about, and who we know treat their workers fairly.

    The cost probably varies a bit from farm to farm, but our share costs about $70 a month during the growing season, which, here in South Florida, is September through May.

    Good food and good karma. Local's the way to go.


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    Jan 12, 2008 5:22 AM GMT
    Posting does not convince me and I actually have the benefit of knowing some of my local farms who truly procedue organic live stock and cash crops. So I guess it depends on how close you are to the farmers who produce your food!icon_biggrin.gif
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    Jan 12, 2008 6:45 AM GMT
    Organic is way over-rated, and is MUCH more expensive and more likely to have disease and not be as attractive, and have less food quality.

    Chemicals are used in agriculture for a reason: to feed the masses; to improve efficiency; to make food affordable; to allow food to go to market unspoiled.

    In many cases, science can affect cost reductions of 30%, or more.

    I'm the son of a livestock grower. Trenbolone increases feed efficiency by 30%, and substantially lowers the cost for lean beef.

    Without fertilizer and irrigation, corn yields can be as low as 40 to 50 bushels per acre. With fertilizer, and irrigation, yields approach 200 bushels per acre, or MORE. When I was a kid, a good yield might be 130 bushels per acre with irrigation and anhydrous ammonia. Nowadays, that's been substantially improved, but, I'm not really in touch with agribusiness any more.

    Organic fans can thump all day, but, reality dictates that to feed the masses, chemicals have to be used for pest control, bringing food to market, efficiency, and so on. It's nearly impossible to make money as an organic grower.

    Science has a major place in agribusiness.
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    Jan 12, 2008 7:33 AM GMT
    chuckystud, i don't have a problem with the careful and attentive use of things as long as down the road it isn't having an effect on me that i don't like.

    it may be purely coincidental that i'm in really great health and fend off disease and infection with ease and really fast. but i have a sneaking suspicion that it's due in very large part to my parents always feeding us with healthy foods. further, i as an adult have tried to eat good and lately i try very hard.

    i honestly prefer organic. some organic foods are indeed riddled with scars and infestation but where possible, i distinctly prefer foods that aren't soaked in a brine of chemicals.

    we live 1/2 a block away from a fresh produce farm outlet and they always have about 20x the variety and quantity of -fresh- foods, and it is usually in great condition.
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    Jan 12, 2008 7:55 AM GMT
    You know, I don't care if my produce has a blemish or isn't perfect in appearance. As long as its not spoiled or otherwise not fit for consumption, its outward beauty is merely superficial. Believe it or not, I've always abhored superficiality, and if that revokes my "gay card", so be it. Organic produce tastes much better to me, is free of all the crap I don't want going into my food, and is healthier for it.

    I do, however, care if the meats I consume are full of antibiotics, growth hormones, or have been irradiated to death before I get them. Sure, the reason behind it all is to feed the masses, I understand that. However, the chicken breasts my sister and I had for dinner were abnormally huge... I'm talkin' about breasts that would make Dolly Parton envious... and being the grandson of a farmer that refused to use all that crap, I can tell you I've never seen chickens naturally get breasts that huge. I don't care for it much, either... its too big, takes longer to cook properly, the meat is dryer and tougher than natural chickens, and there's not nearly as much flavor. Nope, I like my chickens (and cows, pigs, turkeys, etc) as natural as possible. Unfortunately in this case, that's the only kind they had at the store.

    I prefer natural. To each his/her own...
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    Jan 12, 2008 8:00 AM GMT
    indeed. i should clarify, scars from bug infestation and the bug still has a little white picket fence and 2.3 kids residing within.
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    Jan 12, 2008 8:21 AM GMT
    FirefighterBlu3 saidindeed. i should clarify, scars from bug infestation and the bug still has a little white picket fence and 2.3 kids residing within.

    Now that's gross... icon_lol.gif
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    Jan 12, 2008 8:26 AM GMT
    doubly so when you use your mouth to initiate his divorce and wrongful death suit...
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    Jan 12, 2008 8:54 AM GMT
    FirefighterBlu3 saiddoubly so when you use your mouth to initiate his divorce and wrongful death suit...

    icon_lol.gificon_lol.gificon_lol.gif