FORUMS > Gay Men's Health Forum Rules

NUTRITION AND PROSTATE CANCER

  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 30, 2010 9:10 PM GMT
    I have prostate cancer. I choke on the words. There is nothing that can anger me more than to read book after book telling you how to avoid prostate cancer by eating “right.” Oh, yes, many of you have read how important it is to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, lots of whole grains, eat little red meat… the list goes on. From my living proof, it is all bullshit. In 1970, I started eating what is considered very healthy. Since that date, I have made my own bread from 9-grain cereal, steel cut oats and raw wheat germ. This is just bread I am talking about. I have never been one all my life eating a lot of eggs. I do eat them on occasion but not often. I eat very little red meat and when I do, I have all the fat removed. I never fry meat of any kind. It is usually boiled and either in a soup or a sauce. I do not eat pork. Anytime I have chicken, the skin comes off and if there are any fat particles on it, they are removed. My point is, I am considered by all the b.s. that is in print, eating right and is supposed to keep one from getting prostate cancer. Also, no one in my family has prostate cancer. I have been reading a lot about the benefits of drinking pomegranate juice that is supposed to be very good if you have prostate cancer because of the high antioxidants in it. One is supposed to drink 8 ounces in the morning when getting up and another 8 ounces at night before going to bed. I have been buying this expensive shit for over three months. I just had a PSA test done and it is a full point and a half higher than when I had the last one done four months ago. I am at 9.64. So much for pomegranate juice. What does it all mean – take these-health nut author’s advice with a grain of salt. (A little pun there.) They are out to make money and plagiarize most of what is in their books from what others have said, which is bullshit. Through the years, I have often told people that I haven’t felt well since I started eating “healthy” foods. Before 1970, give me a thick juicy rare steak, with a baked potato filled with butter and sour cream, a side of asparagus with hollandaise sauce and for dessert, a peach Melba with whipped cream on it and I could lick the world with energy and strength.

    Am I saying to go out and eat at MacDonald’s daily, fill up on greasy potato chips and pizza, the answer is no but if you want to, do it. Life is too damn short. I don’t think “eating healthy” has any bearing on how long you live. I think more each day that life is predestined. I have witnessed many people who have had a diet of a hound dog all their lives and consume a lot of alcohol daily and smoke and live to be in their late 80’s or longer. Perhaps these people have the right answer for living a long and full life. Maybe someone should write a book on this kind of diet for longevity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 2:45 AM GMT
    Sorry to welcome you to the "club." I was diagnosed in Aug '06, PSA 19.3, Gleason 9 (5 + 4). Had been misdiagnosed for 2 years so the tumor had grown out to at least the capsule. I went for radiation, radioactive seeds, and hormone-blocking therapy. I blogged my experience here on RJ: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/150050/

    (There is also an online gay prostate cancer support group on Yahoo. Very good! http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/prostatecancerandgaymen/ ... If you are still considering what treatment to pursue and have questions, I heartily recommend that you ask the guys on there. You will get lots of good answers that the doctors wont tell you. ....There are some straight men on there...they say because gays talk more openly about dicks and the sexual side effects of the disease and treatments than straight men do.)

    After the hormone therapy started to wear off, my PSA shot up to .025 short of alarming per the dr. ... ... There was no more therapy to be done. You only get one shot at being cured. So I chowed down on cruciferous veggies because of their high sulfur content and ability to stimulate the liver to produce phase II enzymes that destroy cancer cells. After seven months of that, my next blood test showed an 88% drop in my PSA....lower than the accuracy of the PSA test. Now the doc says it would have to go up some 4000% for him to become concerned.

    I do believe that diet can aid your body in fighting of cancer. I dont recommend relying on diet to cure yourself and not seeking medical treatment. But in conjunction with medical treatment, your diet can help your body defend itself. NOTE: dont eat or drink anti-oxidants during radiation and radioactive seed treatment, since the anti-oxidants will interfer with the radioactive ions necessary to kill the cancer cells.

    Read this page on broccoli to begin to understand how cruciferous veggies can help you. http://whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

    The National Cancer Institute is even studying chemicals in cruciferous veggies for their potential use as anti-cancer drugs. That's how potent they are.

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane
    3,3-Diindolylmethane or DIM is an anticarcinogen compound derived from the digestion of indole-3-carbinol, found in Brassica vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower. The reputation of Brassica vegetables as medicinal plants rests in part on the activities of diindolylmethane.

    Properties
    ...Because of its various potent anti-cancer properties, the National Cancer Institute of the United States has begun clinical trials of DIM as a therapeutic for numerous forms of cancer. Due to its innate immune modulating properties (potentiation of Interferon-Gamma receptors and production), DIM is also under investigation as a treatment for a variety of viral infections and antibiotic resistant bacteria. As DIM has been demonstrated to synergize with Interferon-Gamma in the potentiation of the MHC-I Complex, it is currently also under investigation as an adjuvant to IFN-G treatment models for both cancer and viral infections such as HIV, HPV and Hepatitis.


    Sulforaphane
    Sulforaphane is an organosulfur compound that exhibits anticancer, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties. It is obtained from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli. The enzyme myrosinase transforms glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate, into sulforaphane upon damage to the plant (such as from chewing). Young sprouts of broccoli and cauliflower are particularly rich in glucoraphanin.

    ...The anticancer activity of sulforaphane is thought to be related to the induction of phase-II enzymes of xenobiotic transformation (such as quinone reductase and glutathione S-transferase), and enhancing the transcription of tumor suppressor proteins, possibly via inhibitory effects on histone deacetylase.

    Sulforaphane and diindolylmethane (another compound from Brassica vegetables) inhibit cancer growth.


    Isothiocyanates
    Isothiocyanates, such as phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane, have been shown to inhibit carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis and as such are useful chemopreventive agents against the development and proliferation of cancers. They work on a variety of levels. Most notably, they have been shown to inhibit carcinogenesis through inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes, which oxidise compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)into more polar epoxy-diols which can then cause mutation and induce cancer development. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) has been shown to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines, and in some cases, is even able to induce apoptosis in cells that are resistant to some currently used chemotherapeutic drugs. For example, in drug resistant leukemia cells which produce the powerful apoptosis inhibitor protein BCl-2. Furthermore, isothiocyanates have been the basis of a drug in development which replaces the sulfur bonds with selenium, with far stronger potency against melanoma.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 3:30 AM GMT
    I'm sorry to hear you've been diagnosed with Prostate cancer. The good news is that there's a lot of hope and with an optimistic attitude and an open mind, you should hopefully be okay. Prostate cancer has excellent survival rates:

    http://prostate-cancer.emedtv.com/prostate-cancer/prostate-cancer-survival-rates.html

    I remember reading that Broccoli is very benificial in reducing PSA numbers, so you might consider giving that a try. Here are a few articles from reputable sources to back that up:

    http://www.psa-rising.com/eatingwell/broccoli_DIM_05_2003.htm

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080701221450.htm

    http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/news/20030520/broccoli-blocks-prostate-cancer-cells

    I've also had numerous friends deal with cancer, some didn't make it, but many have recovered. The common denominator with all who have survived, is incorporating natural, holistic approaches (in addition to their doctors' orders). Some tried Chinese medicine, others did juicing.

    I wouldn't completely reject eating a healthy diet, just because cancer formed at the age of 65. Some people eat poorly and get cancer in their teens. Our bodies constantly have cancerous cells forming and a healthy body usually manages to get rid of them. Only when things get seriously out of balance, does cancer become the disease we all talk about. Today, doctors are also diagnosing cancer much earlier, so people know they're sick long before they actually feel sick.

    The more we learn about cancer, the more it seems to be an internal process. It's your own body responding to a foriegn stimulus, usually a virus or fungus. So, the key to curing cancer is getting your body back on track and as strong as possible.

    The most important thing anyone can do to avoid cancer is increase their vegetable intake and avoid stress. Eating more or less animal protein (eggs, chicken without fat, etc.), is still not a vegetable, and you need foods that contain antioxidants on a regular basis.

    If you already have cancer, total avoidance of sugar is probably the first and easiest thing to do. Cancer cells require more glucose than normal cells, so by eliminating sugar from your diet, you're more likely to "starve" a tumor. Sugar is in almost everything these days, so it takes some work and reading labels to really avoid it completely, but it's worth it:

    http://www.news-medical.net/news/2004/05/15/1582.aspx

    I really hope things work out for you. Hang in there!
  • jperfit Posts: 562
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:14 AM GMT
    Caslon13000 saidSorry to welcome you to the "club." I was diagnosed in Aug '06, PSA 19.3, Gleason 9 (5 + 4). Had been misdiagnosed for 2 years so the tumor had grown out to at least the capsule. I went for radiation, radioactive seeds, and hormone-blocking therapy. I blogged my experience here on RJ: http://www.realjock.com/gayforums/150050/

    (There is also an online gay prostate cancer support group on Yahoo. Very good! http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/prostatecancerandgaymen/ ... If you are still considering what treatment to pursue and have questions, I heartily recommend that you ask the guys on there. You will get lots of good answers that the doctors wont tell you. ....There are some straight men on there...they say because gays talk more openly about dicks and the sexual side effects of the disease and treatments than straight men do.)

    After the hormone therapy started to wear off, my PSA shot up to .025 short of alarming per the dr. ... ... There was no more therapy to be done. You only get one shot at being cured. So I chowed down on cruciferous veggies because of their high sulfur content and ability to stimulate the liver to produce phase II enzymes that destroy cancer cells. After seven months of that, my next blood test showed an 88% drop in my PSA....lower than the accuracy of the PSA test. Now the doc says it would have to go up some 4000% for him to become concerned.

    I do believe that diet can aid your body in fighting of cancer. I dont recommend relying on diet to cure yourself and not seeking medical treatment. But in conjunction with medical treatment, your diet can help your body defend itself. NOTE: dont eat or drink anti-oxidants during radiation and radioactive seed treatment, since the anti-oxidants will interfer with the radioactive ions necessary to kill the cancer cells.

    Read this page on broccoli to begin to understand how cruciferous veggies can help you. http://whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=9

    The National Cancer Institute is even studying chemicals in cruciferous veggies for their potential use as anti-cancer drugs. That's how potent they are.

    3,3'-Diindolylmethane
    3,3-Diindolylmethane or DIM is an anticarcinogen compound derived from the digestion of indole-3-carbinol, found in Brassica vegetables such as broccoli and cauliflower. The reputation of Brassica vegetables as medicinal plants rests in part on the activities of diindolylmethane.

    Properties
    ...Because of its various potent anti-cancer properties, the National Cancer Institute of the United States has begun clinical trials of DIM as a therapeutic for numerous forms of cancer. Due to its innate immune modulating properties (potentiation of Interferon-Gamma receptors and production), DIM is also under investigation as a treatment for a variety of viral infections and antibiotic resistant bacteria. As DIM has been demonstrated to synergize with Interferon-Gamma in the potentiation of the MHC-I Complex, it is currently also under investigation as an adjuvant to IFN-G treatment models for both cancer and viral infections such as HIV, HPV and Hepatitis.


    Sulforaphane
    Sulforaphane is an organosulfur compound that exhibits anticancer, antidiabetic, and antimicrobial properties. It is obtained from cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli. The enzyme myrosinase transforms glucoraphanin, a glucosinolate, into sulforaphane upon damage to the plant (such as from chewing). Young sprouts of broccoli and cauliflower are particularly rich in glucoraphanin.

    ...The anticancer activity of sulforaphane is thought to be related to the induction of phase-II enzymes of xenobiotic transformation (such as quinone reductase and glutathione S-transferase), and enhancing the transcription of tumor suppressor proteins, possibly via inhibitory effects on histone deacetylase.

    Sulforaphane and diindolylmethane (another compound from Brassica vegetables) inhibit cancer growth.


    Isothiocyanates
    Isothiocyanates, such as phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) and sulforaphane, have been shown to inhibit carcinogenesis and tumorigenesis and as such are useful chemopreventive agents against the development and proliferation of cancers. They work on a variety of levels. Most notably, they have been shown to inhibit carcinogenesis through inhibition of cytochrome P450 enzymes, which oxidise compounds such as benzo[a]pyrene and other polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)into more polar epoxy-diols which can then cause mutation and induce cancer development. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) has been shown to induce apoptosis in certain cancer cell lines, and in some cases, is even able to induce apoptosis in cells that are resistant to some currently used chemotherapeutic drugs. For example, in drug resistant leukemia cells which produce the powerful apoptosis inhibitor protein BCl-2. Furthermore, isothiocyanates have been the basis of a drug in development which replaces the sulfur bonds with selenium, with far stronger potency against melanoma.


    Indol 3-carbonal and DIM must be taken in the right amounts, like meats they have their different grades of potency, lots of research has come out of MD Anderson and John Hopkins medical research center showing documentation as to how the chemical actually attaches to the cancer cell while in form stage b4 it can become active, just eating broccoli is not going to cut it because u have to eat more than 16-20 bushels daily to get even close to what the amount is needed to be effective, the best one that i seen so far is at: http://barrysvitaminsfl.com/onlinestore.html (the protector), they don't come in fancy nice looking bottles, when u walk in it looks like a lab because he gets the highest potency of any nutritional supplements and the stuff works, many of his clientele are cancer or were cancer patients, another great cancer preventative including prostate is EGCG (epigallocatchin Gallate) which is the chemical found in green tea, however u cannot drink enough green tea to get this chemical u have to supplement, u need to highest poyphenol amount (98%), needs to be taken in liquid/concentration form, more and more studies are coming out about the chemical daily, even Phyzir(drug company) was looking for a way to make it into a synthetic so that it can be sold as a drug but they have not been successful as yet, You owe it to yourself to pull up the website and give the place a call concerning these nutrients, their are not sales people and are not going to make or encourage u to buy anything, they just give you the raw science of the product. Good luck to u all.
  • Celticmusl Posts: 4324
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:27 AM GMT
    My father had prostate cancer and overcame it after one radiation treatment. He ate a somewhat healthy diet. There are some inherently genetic concerns regarding cancer, of course. I take DIM as well as other anti-estrogen supplements. I also take saw palmetto, which is good for the prostate.

    I have taken indole-3-carbinol since about the late eighties, and I'm a vegetarian. Do I think this is a sure proof way of avoiding prostate cancer? No. But if I get it at least I won't blame myself for not taking care of myself right. Unfortunately there are no guarantees where cancer is concerned.

    They say that most men that die of "old age" usually have prostate cancer although they might not have even been diagnosed. I guess it is pretty common in old age.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:33 AM GMT
    Celticmusl saidI guess it is pretty common in old age.

    You could have left that part out! ...



  • Celticmusl Posts: 4324
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:37 AM GMT
    Caslon13000 said
    Celticmusl saidI guess it is pretty common in old age.

    You could have left that part out! ...






    Lol, yeah, I guess I could have written that more eloquently. I meant that it is not uncommon for men to suffer from prostate cancer, and as we age the chances of having it get greater.
  • jperfit Posts: 562
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:44 AM GMT
    Celticmusl saidMy father had prostate cancer and overcame it after one radiation treatment. He ate a somewhat healthy diet. There are some inherently genetic concerns regarding cancer, of course. I take DIM as well as other anti-estrogen supplements. I also take saw palmetto, which is good for the prostate.

    I have taken indole-3-carbinol since about the late eighties, and I'm a vegetarian. Do I think this is a sure proof way of avoiding prostate cancer? No. But if I get it at least I won't blame myself for not taking care of myself right. Unfortunately there are no guarantees where cancer is concerned.

    They say that most men that die of "old age" usually have prostate cancer although they might not have even been diagnosed. I guess it is pretty common in old age.


    Every man (should he live long enough) will get prostate cancer, it is inevitable but with the right nutrients your body will kill off the cells b4 they become active till u reach the point your system cannot do any longer, usually by that time your to old to do anything about it, u just live with it till u leave this earth because you will probably sign off from something else other than the prostate cancer and though these nutrients donot offer 100% protection u should want to follow the science/research, the other alternative would be testosterone blocking treatment and lupron (drug) which will send your estrogens into overtime, u will be so effeminate that u will not be able to bring back the man u once was.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:50 AM GMT
    jperfit said...the other alternative would be testosterone blocking treatment and lupron (drug) which will send your estrogens into overtime, u will be so effeminate that u will not be able to bring back the man u once was.

    Lupron didnt work on me. I am the only patient my dr had or any of his buddies ever heard of who didnt respond to Lupron. I told the dumb son of a bitch that it wasnt working but he wouldnt listen to me. I finally demanded a blood and ...voila... it wasnt working! That additional 2 months of non-treatment added another 6 months of treatment on to my already 6 months of treatments. I got Zoladex after that, which made me totally squirrelly! ....and gave me hot flashes from Hell! ...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 4:15 PM GMT
    I am very touched by your responses and suggestions and links to check out. Thanks, very much. Yes, there are no guarantees in life. I have been one of the fortunate of weighing the same amount that I did when I was in high school. I weigh 150 pounds and am 5’ 10” tall. Throughout my life, I have never varied five pounds. When a nurse recently checked my weight, she repeated, “150 pounds.” I told her that I had always been that weight and she exclaimed, “Oh, really! Do you exercise?” I said, “Only when I fall down and have to pick myself up.” The vegetables that I eat large portions of over many years are broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, Swiss chard and carrots. I used to eat a lot of collards but haven’t been buying them for a couple of years. As you can see, I have been eating the top veggies. I never drink whole milk – always the non-fat dry milk. Most often, I drink three glasses of red wine. Wine, in itself is supposed to be good for you. One more thing: I have NEVER smoked. Everyone in my family smoked. Though I have never smoked, I certainly breathed plenty of it throughout my life. I have been a professional musician and worked for years in clubs where the smoke was thick enough to cut it with a knife.

    I have been reading good reports on chlorophyll and the use of light killing cancer cells. Chlorophyll by itself is harmless in the body but high beams of light cause a reaction that kills the cancer cells and doesn’t destroy the healthy cells. This special chlorophyll is found in the bottom of the ocean. The drug is called Tookad. The FDA has been dragging their asses, as usual for this and another called Provenge to be used. Provenge has its problems because of the confusing issue of dosage.

    Again, thank you all for responding. I have a lot of reading to do with all the links.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 9:32 PM GMT
    Hi, Caslon –

    I checked out the gay prostate site and will follow it. I haven’t registered yet. It doesn’t seem like too many questions asked or responses but it is early in this year.

    What really pisses me off is that I went to a doctor in 2007 for the first time in 35 years. I have always been healthy and am a believer that ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.’ This does not mean that I haven’t had prostate exams all these years. For several years here, we had a group of doctors that performed digital prostate exams free and one could also get a PSA test done for $10. For several years, I had this done. As far back as 1993, I was told that I had an enlarged prostate. My PSA was always in the range of 3.2 – 3.4, which is under the cut off number of 4. I never gave it much thought. Regarding the enlarged prostate, I never had and still to this day do not have a problem urinating. I can pee like I could when I was a teenager. So much for an enlarged prostate. Anyway, back to the no count doctor I saw in 2007. I went to him purely because I figured after all these years I should have a check-up. I wanted a full blood work done and I suggested that I have a colonoscopy. He agreed. Everything looked good on my blood test but the PSA. It read 5.7. I asked the son of a bitch about it because I knew that anything over 4 was considered not normal. He said that he thought it was fine and that at my age, the PSA goes up. I had the colonoscopy, which was fine. The doctor that did the colonoscopy looked at my blood work and said, “Are you aware of your PSA reading?” I told him that I was and discussed it with my doctor and he said that at my age, it was in the safe zone. The doctor looked surprised when I said that and said nothing. I still trusted the primary doctor that I went to. Not long after this, I received a letter stating that the doctor was leaving the area because of personal family problems. Not feeling great in June 2009, I decided to see another doctor. Again, I requested a blood test and also, a chest x-ray because I was hurting in bed around my chest. Also, I was getting a lot of pain in my hips and lower back. Must state that I have been a very poor sleeper for years and never rest well and generally wake up with being sore in my joints. This was nothing new but I seemed to be getting worse. Also, I had lost my longtime partner and was very upset about it and felt that the way I was feeling was partly because of my loss. He has been gone going into three years. Anyway, the blood test came back with a PSA reading of 9.4. This is a sizable jump in two years. The doctor said that I should see a urologist. I saw the urologist and he immediately suggested a biopsy, as well as a CT of my pelvis and a bone scan. He felt strongly that I had prostate cancer but was probably in the early stages. I insisted on having another PSA test. I did and it was a full point lower – 8.4. I was very pleased but the urologist wasn’t. He said that it was still too high. The CT and the full bone scan came back with no sign of cancer. Quite surprising, the chest x-ray showed that I have chronic COPD. I have never smoked but have been around it for many years. I told the doctor that I had no sign of a problem and that I could still run as well as I could when I was a teenager. He said that many times, athletes get a wrong reading of having COPD because they breathe deeply. I told him that I breathe deeply even in bed and that I have been a professional musician and singer. He said that my singing probably is the reason for the reading. Waiting four months longer and getting my recent PSA results has been most disappointing to me. I have already stated in my earlier posts that I eat well but I really tried to even be more careful before having this test. I drank and still drink pomegranate juice. Also, I never touched my joint for a good week before the PSA test. I guess many of you know that sex or even a digital exam just before having the test done can throw off the PSA reading.

    Caslon, your post of being diagnosed is quite awhile back and a lot has taken place since then. They seem to be getting a lot of good results with cryosurgery, also referred to as cryoablation. It is less invasive. The urologist that I am going to is very experienced in this procedure. However, becoming impotent is quite high with this procedure. Becoming incontinent is at a low 1%. I told the doctor up front that I would rather be dead than live the rest of my life in a bathroom and having no social life. Quality of life is most important to me. I have a Gleason score of 7. I wish it were better. I do not understand the Gleason score. I am told that I have a 3/4 on one side of the prostate and a 4/3 on the other, making a score of 7. The doctor said that I have numerous cells on my left side and just a few very minor on the right side. I asked the doctor if I had the large cells or the small cells. I wanted to know if I had the aggressive type cancer. His answer was less than ideal. He said that we don’t refer to large or small cells. He followed with that he felt it was in the early stages and was totally confined in the prostate.

    Caslon, I am glad to know that you are doing fine.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Jan 31, 2010 10:15 PM GMT
    The Gleason score denotes the contortion of the cancer cells. It is a scale of 1 to 5, 1 being the least. Since not all cells are going to be contorted the same, they give two numbers. The first indicating what most cells are like, the second is what the second most cells are like. They add them together to get a single digit.

    Incontinence from surgery vary greatly from the guys on the yahoo site. Some guys have little trouble passed the initial healing, other quite a lot. There are Kegel exercises that one does to strengthen the muscles and alleviate the incontinence.

    Surgery however can affect two nerve bundles that pass over the prostate and control an erection. If the nerves are damaged, you can lose the ability to have an erection. However, you will still have the ability to feel an orgasm...different set of nerves. Surgery also shortens your dick length...quite noticeably, I gather.

    I would ask about how cryo might affect those nerve bundles.

    There is also a new microwave technique...maybe not in the US yet. It seems they kind of cook the prostate like a piece of chicken in a microwave oven.

    The radioactive/hormone blocking doesnt affect the nerve bundles. And with Lupron many guys have no problems, but there can be depression. I, on the other hand, having Zoladex, endured massive depression. There is a bright side to no testosterone. Life is very calm and pleasant.

    If your cancer is definitely confined to your prostate, you might not need the hormone blocking at all. ...And radiation, with or without radioactive seeds, is a piece of cake. It's the hormone blocking that gets you. But that is to starve the PC cells of testosterone that they need to grow....and is mostly used if there is a chance that the cancer has escaped from the prostate. Otherwise they just kill the cancer cells with radiation. Modern radiation machines use a 3-D model of the tumor and zap it very precisely. They dont have to spray your whole lower abdomen anymore.

    So it's kind of a case of pick your poison. None of the treatments are free of side effects.

    If there is a PC support group in your area, I would encourage you to attend that, too.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 2:22 AM GMT
    Something simple, you might want to try, is vitamin D. Prostate cancer mortality is higher in areas of the US that receive less sun..hence lower vitamin D levels..

    http://www.johnshopkinshealthalerts.com/reports/prostate_disorders/3115-1.html

    Off topic.. You mentioned the chest x-ray diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. COPD should not be diagnosed solely by chest x-ray. There can be false positive readings of the film. If you were not a smoker, never had chronic or recurrent lung infections or asthma, and have no respiratory symptoms you probably don't have COPD. Yet in spite all that was mentioned, it still is possible to have to have COPD. Spirometry is simple and is the best way to rule it out.

    Hope you have a speedy recovery.
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 2:24 AM GMT
    My Dad is a Prostate Cancer survivor! Talk about a wake up call!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 2:45 AM GMT
    a1972guy saidMy Dad is a Prostate Cancer survivor! Talk about a wake up call!

    I like to hear about survivors! ...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 2:49 AM GMT
    Caslon13000 said
    a1972guy saidMy Dad is a Prostate Cancer survivor! Talk about a wake up call!

    I like to hear about survivors! ...


    I won't lie, it was a tough battle after the surgery. However he is back to work and doing GREAT! He had surgery Dec. of 2008 and had some issues and still lightly dealing with some post-surgery issues, however nothing major! Just GLAD he pulled through! THANKS CASLON!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 4:02 AM GMT
    a1972guy said
    Caslon13000 said
    a1972guy saidMy Dad is a Prostate Cancer survivor! Talk about a wake up call!

    I like to hear about survivors! ...


    I won't lie, it was a tough battle after the surgery. However he is back to work and doing GREAT! He had surgery Dec. of 2008 and had some issues and still lightly dealing with some post-surgery issues, however nothing major! Just GLAD he pulled through! THANKS CASLON!

    Glad to hear it. The earlier it is caught, the easier it is to treat. But it isnt a walk in park no way. ...
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 4:15 AM GMT
    SeaSon saidI'm sorry to hear you've been diagnosed with Prostate cancer. The good news is that there's a lot of hope and with an optimistic attitude and an open mind, you should hopefully be okay. Prostate cancer has excellent survival rates:

    http://prostate-cancer.emedtv.com/prostate-cancer/prostate-cancer-survival-rates.html

    I remember reading that Broccoli is very benificial in reducing PSA numbers, so you might consider giving that a try. Here are a few articles from reputable sources to back that up:

    http://www.psa-rising.com/eatingwell/broccoli_DIM_05_2003.htm

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/07/080701221450.htm

    http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/news/20030520/broccoli-blocks-prostate-cancer-cells

    I've also had numerous friends deal with cancer, some didn't make it, but many have recovered. The common denominator with all who have survived, is incorporating natural, holistic approaches (in addition to their doctors' orders). Some tried Chinese medicine, others did juicing.

    I wouldn't completely reject eating a healthy diet, just because cancer formed at the age of 65. Some people eat poorly and get cancer in their teens. Our bodies constantly have cancerous cells forming and a healthy body usually manages to get rid of them. Only when things get seriously out of balance, does cancer become the disease we all talk about. Today, doctors are also diagnosing cancer much earlier, so people know they're sick long before they actually feel sick.

    The more we learn about cancer, the more it seems to be an internal process. It's your own body responding to a foriegn stimulus, usually a virus or fungus. So, the key to curing cancer is getting your body back on track and as strong as possible.

    The most important thing anyone can do to avoid cancer is increase their vegetable intake and avoid stress. Eating more or less animal protein (eggs, chicken without fat, etc.), is still not a vegetable, and you need foods that contain antioxidants on a regular basis.

    If you already have cancer, total avoidance of sugar is probably the first and easiest thing to do. Cancer cells require more glucose than normal cells, so by eliminating sugar from your diet, you're more likely to "starve" a tumor. Sugar is in almost everything these days, so it takes some work and reading labels to really avoid it completely, but it's worth it:

    http://www.news-medical.net/news/2004/05/15/1582.aspx

    I really hope things work out for you. Hang in there!



    One reason I like SEASON so much. Wise and he backs it up.

    The key here is to AVOID sugar at all cost and things that turn into sugar like bread.

    Really, like he said everything is about high fiber, and lots of greens and vegetables. Take it how ever you can. Tomatoes and Saw Palmetto are both good and you should consume massive amounts to rid your body of cancer. I can testify that it will work with mind control and diet control!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.Log in to view his profile
    QUOTE Feb 01, 2010 9:30 AM GMT
    A few years ago it was recommended to take lycopene (the carotenoid that gives the red color to tomatoes, watermelons, and pink grapefruit) and folic acid for prostate health. I took both as recommended. Now there is a warning issued for both concerning prostate cancer.

    In the May (2007) issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, researchers based at the National Cancer Institute and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center report that lycopene, an antioxidant predominately found in tomatoes, does not effectively prevent prostate cancer. In fact, the researchers noted an association between beta-carotene, an antioxidant related to lycopene, and an increased risk for aggressive prostate cancer.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/05/070517063011.htm

    Folic acid and prostate cancer
    http://www.webmd.com/prostate-cancer/news/20090310/folic-acid-may-raise-prostate-cancer-risk

    I wonder if I caused any harm by supplementing with lycopene and folic acid. It is irritating that while trying to prevent prostate cancer; I might have been causing it.

    There is a lot of conflicting information about the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer.