Brewing your own beer.

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    Feb 02, 2010 10:02 PM GMT
    I just bottled my first batch of homebrew for carbonation. Unfortunately I don't have a kegerator so I'm having to bottle it and then refrigerate it after two weeks or so.


    Pale ale, with a lot of clover honey added in, and instead of regular old white sugar for carbonation, I used this turbonado sugar (sugar in the raw, but a different brand)

    I'm excited to see how the sugar affects the taste post carbonation.

    anybody else ever brew their own before?
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    Feb 02, 2010 11:18 PM GMT
    I brew beer all the time. I use brewers sugar on the second fermentation though. As for the two weeks, yes, you could open it after two weeks but reality is that I've found a month is better to let it sit at room temp (65-75 degrees) for the secondary fermentation.

    Also prefer bottling over kegging. Kegging is good if you have an extra fridge or you're supplying a party but bottling is nice if you make your own labels with your own brewery name and then give it as hospitality, holiday or other event gifts. Great novelty item that people love receiving and talking about. One thing I always tell those who are lucky to get some beer, if I don't get the bottles back, you don't get anymore beer. They tend to always return them. I also keep com'l bottles (not screw cap only) for re-use with my home brew, saves money.

    Let us know how it ends up. Good luck.
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:29 AM GMT
    Yes! I have about 50 batches under my belt - so to speak lol.

    Like EB925GUY said - you'll probalby like the product better if you let it carbonate close to room temp.

    The turbinado sugar will give you a very cidery flavor. As you say it's your first batch, I'm going to make some assumptions about your technique. As long as you were scrupulously clean and sterile, your beer will probably improve with some aging. If you don't like it after 2 weeks then let it age for 3-4 months at room temp, in the dark and I think you'll find it's significantly better.

    If I could go back and give myself advice when I was starting out I would say 2 things: (1) You can't be too clean - sterilize the crap out of everything with steam. (2) Don't waste your time carbonating with added sugar, it creates off flavors that are hard to get rid of. Go ahead and set up to counter-pressure carbonate. Yeah it's expensive, but it's SO worth it.

    Good Luck and Let us know how it turns out!
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:38 AM GMT
    I used to do it fairly often, when I lived in tiny apartments. I actually built my current kitchen (as big as some of my former apartments) with space for brewing/baking and other projects, and left room under the counter for a kegerator. But I just haven't had time in the last decade.

    Actually, brewing makes a fairly good small party activity, especially if you're starting with malted grain and going through the whole process. It gives you a focus for an afternoon of hanging out with friends, as well as free labor, which can be important if you have to bottle it. Then everyone is "invested" in the brew for a later party.

    Of course, if it's a gay party, then everyone will have to wear those little white egyptian skirts, and walk sideways.
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    Feb 03, 2010 3:19 AM GMT
    Voltaire saidYes! I have about 50 batches under my belt - so to speak lol.

    Like EB925GUY said - you'll probalby like the product better if you let it carbonate close to room temp.

    The turbinado sugar will give you a very cidery flavor. As you say it's your first batch, I'm going to make some assumptions about your technique. As long as you were scrupulously clean and sterile, your beer will probably improve with some aging. If you don't like it after 2 weeks then let it age for 3-4 months at room temp, in the dark and I think you'll find it's significantly better.

    If I could go back and give myself advice when I was starting out I would say 2 things: (1) You can't be too clean - sterilize the crap out of everything with steam. (2) Don't waste your time carbonating with added sugar, it creates off flavors that are hard to get rid of. Go ahead and set up to counter-pressure carbonate. Yeah it's expensive, but it's SO worth it.

    Good Luck and Let us know how it turns out!


    well I used a Mr. beer kit, so the sugar/secondary is kind of a given. If I ever get into a position where I have a lot of free space (hopefully when I buy a house I'll have a basement for my guitars and brewing and stuff if I stick with it) I'll definitely look into the counter-pressure stuff. That's where the CO2 is added in at the tap, right?
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    Feb 11, 2010 2:49 AM GMT
    alrighty everyone who gave a crap.


    this is my first beer after a week and a half in the bottle. it needs to stay bottled a little longer annnnnnnnnnnnnd I'm going to actually condition it in the fridge after two/three weeks but hot damn this is delicious!
    IMG00284-20100210-2038.jpg


    jealous much?
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    Feb 11, 2010 2:51 AM GMT
    Is this something you could do without expensive equipment as a hobby?
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    Feb 11, 2010 2:53 AM GMT
    Funkapottomous saidalrighty everyone who gave a crap.


    this is my first beer after a week and a half in the bottle. it needs to stay bottled a little longer annnnnnnnnnnnnd I'm going to actually condition it in the fridge after two/three weeks but hot damn this is delicious!
    IMG00284-20100210-2038.jpg


    jealous much?

    Arent there a lot of calories in beer....ummm....can you afford all those calories? .... just saying
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    Feb 11, 2010 2:57 AM GMT
    Ricovelas saidIs this something you could do without expensive equipment as a hobby?
    yes.

    for about 30 bucks, you can go to bed bath and beyond or somewhere else and buy a Mr. beer kit, that comes with everything to make one Two Gallon batch of beer. You can buy a set of their replacement beer stuff for another thirty bucks, so for sixty bucks you can make yourself 8 gallons of beer?


    or you can go to a homebrew supply store and buy the grain and do it the hard way. I've been cruising www.homebrewtalk.com and these guys know their stuff. if you're interested, you should check them out and ask for their advice. Those guys are nuts.


    and to Caslon. Seriously dude, look at me. Do you think I really care about the calories in beer? I just come on here for conversation and to hit up with the hotties. I haven't had time to work out in forever with moving changing colleges so at this point I'm just not giving a fuck until I can actually do something about it. icon_mad.gif
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    Feb 11, 2010 3:07 AM GMT
    Funkapottomous said ... and to Caslon. Seriously dude, look at me. Do you think I really care about the calories in beer? I just come on here for conversation and to hit up with the hotties. I haven't had time to work out in forever with moving changing colleges so at this point I'm just not giving a fuck until I can actually do something about it. icon_mad.gif

    oh, I thought a while back you said you were trying to do something about it





    ... besides I thought you people were supposed to be jolly







    ... beer drinkers, that is







    Ich bin unschuldig. Du kannst mir Nichts beweisen. Ich verweigere Alles. ... icon_wink.gif
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    Feb 11, 2010 3:26 AM GMT
    Ricovelas saidIs this something you could do without expensive equipment as a hobby?

    There is a modest initial investment, but it's usually much less than people imagine: 5 gallon plastic barrel, siphon hose, thermometer, at least two cases of standard brown bottles, cap crimper, large enough stove pot to heat the wort/malt/hops. A Hydrometer is helpful, but not required.
    For each 5-gallon batch, you'd normally get: dry and/or liquid malt extract, corn sugar, different hops, and activator yeast.

    There are many other things you can do to customize your batch, but am I missing anything, guys?
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    Feb 11, 2010 3:26 AM GMT
    Caslon13000 said
    Funkapottomous said ... and to Caslon. Seriously dude, look at me. Do you think I really care about the calories in beer? I just come on here for conversation and to hit up with the hotties. I haven't had time to work out in forever with moving changing colleges so at this point I'm just not giving a fuck until I can actually do something about it. icon_mad.gif

    oh, I thought a while back you said you were trying to do something about it





    ... besides I thought you people were supposed to be jolly







    ... beer drinkers, that is







    Ich bin unschuldig. Du kannst mir Nichts beweisen. Ich verweigere Alles. ... icon_wink.gif
    to quote ZZ Top.



    we're beer drinkers and hellraisers.