Whats the best dog food.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 02, 2010 11:55 PM GMT
    My boyfriend and I recently got a puppy (he's so cute). The breeder gave us a brand called Diamond dog food. We took our dog to the vet and she informed us that Diamond isnt the best food to feed a dog. It has most recently been recalled for one reason or another. For all you dog owners. What do you feed your dog(s)?
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    Feb 03, 2010 12:40 AM GMT
    We went thru several brands, some that were really expensive, but settled on Kirkland (Costco's house brand).
    Check the ingredients. Almost everything else has gluten and byproducts.

    Also, they have a puppy version and a healthy weight recipe in additon to regular adult.
  • coolarmydude

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    Feb 03, 2010 12:42 AM GMT
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  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Feb 03, 2010 12:44 AM GMT
    What breed? I feel the breed of the dog is very important in determining the dog food. I only feed my dog organic, without wheat(gluten) or most other kinds of grains(finally people are catching onto this....Ive known it for 10 plus years because I had food sensitive pups).

    Never buy any dog food that has "animal fat" or the word "animal" to describe anything in it's ingredients. You have no idea what animal it is coming from...dog...horse...etc. I kid you not.
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    Feb 03, 2010 12:46 AM GMT
    at home we always fed our dogs purina one. when we adopted our guys from the pound their coats were all brown, dull, dead fur, and they're black labs. after a few weeks of purina one their coats were black, healthy, and shiny. you can probably be safe with a couple of kinds of food, but it pays to not cheap out.
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    Feb 03, 2010 12:54 AM GMT
    We own an Olde English Bulldog.
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    Feb 03, 2010 12:55 AM GMT
    our dogs get a mixture of 75% raw meat and 25% raw vegetables (ground beef or lamb, heart, spleen, liver, sweet potatoes, cabbage, squash, kale, cauliflower, turnips, broccoli, carrots, chard, kale, parsley)
  • coolarmydude

    Posts: 9190

    Feb 03, 2010 12:57 AM GMT
    Science diet is another good brand. The Army requires only that brand for military working dogs.
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    Feb 03, 2010 12:59 AM GMT
    coolarmydude saidScience diet is another good brand. The Army requires only that brand for military working dogs.

    Agree.
    Our Westie will be 16 next month and she's always had Science Diet.
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:04 AM GMT
    Allie loves a good shrimp po-boy and red beans and rice. OK... she's 13 YO and she can have whatever makes her happy. And she knows it.
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:04 AM GMT
    Nutro Lamb & Rice for my dogs because it's mainly lamb and rice by order of ingredients and in the past it was one of the only foods one of my dogs could stomach without diahreah etc.
    Many other brands even more expensive Lamb & Rice formulations do not show lamb as the first ingredient and usually contain a mix of other grains as well.

    Here's something to remember when looking at ingredient labels..
    They are listed in decreasing order of amount of said ingredients BUT, BIG BUT

    Say Lamb is the first ingredient and Rice is the second ingredient... the combination of the 3rd and 4th ingredients etc totalled could actually exceed the amount of lamb or rice in the product.

    So for example if the 3rd ingredient is corn meal and the 4 ingredient is corn gluten, the combined amount of both the corn products could actually be greater than the amount of total lamb product in the bag. Interesting huh...

    Now in the case of Nutro Lamb and Rice...
    Lamb is 1st
    Ground rice is 2nd
    Rice flour is 3rd
    Milled rice is 4th
    Whole Brown Rice is 5th..
    then other stuff but no corn or wheat or soy

    So in reality,,, those 4 types of rices probably are the true main ingredient of Nutro Lamb and Rice by weight etc exceeding the amount of lamb.. but rice is still more easily digestible to dogs than corn or wheat or soy.
    Plus over 15 odd years I've had no problems with the product and their coats look great.

    That being said.. I know people who feed their dogs Ol Roy from WalMart and their dogs are in wonderful condition as well.

    Bottom line when it comes to dog foods.. Price does NOT equal quality. Marketing and snob appeal have more to do with the price.


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    Feb 03, 2010 1:07 AM GMT
    I fed my Pit Eukanuba Lamb and Rice
  • DCEric

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    Feb 03, 2010 1:14 AM GMT
    We make the cat food ourselves, it's cheaper and we control what she eats. Also, she knows when we cook her food because she gets comfortable in the kitchen and watches. She doesn't do that when we cook our food.
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:26 AM GMT
    Eukanuba was bought and shut down by Iam's, so it doesn't exist anymore (unless stores are clearing old inventory).

    I've had my pooch on Nutro for going on 12 years and he's just fine. Bigger issues is to NOT give in to the begging/temptation to give your dog people food unless it's something that came straight outta the ground (my Beagle loves carrots). If you feed your dog food that was made for dogs, most all of them will be just fine.

    Dogs have lived long and healthy lives since long before vegan homeopathic lesbian veterinarians started telling you that eating anything other than vegan homeopathic food will kill them.
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    Feb 03, 2010 1:34 AM GMT
    sluggo_la saidour dogs get a mixture of 75% raw meat and 25% raw vegetables (ground beef or lamb, heart, spleen, liver, sweet potatoes, cabbage, squash, kale, cauliflower, turnips, broccoli, carrots, chard, kale, parsley)


    Which is ideal unless your dog is prone to stomach upset; then such a raw diet may give the pup digestive and stool problems. If so, an easy grain free dry kibble alternative to raw diets is Timberwolf Organics Ocean Blue - www.timberlandorganics.com
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19138

    Feb 03, 2010 1:47 AM GMT
    I have always fed my dogs dry Science Diet, and they get nothing else to eat but a little solid doggy treat twice a day. I've never fed my dogs table scraps or left-overs as it is not good for them.



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    Feb 03, 2010 1:53 AM GMT
    Please visit dogfoodanalysis.com

    They rate all the brand out there using a star rating. 1 star = fast food for dogs

    Do your research and you will be surprised that what you think is high quality is actually the bottom of the barrel.

    Even though most of the higher quality foods are more expensive, you don't have to feed as much due to the high nutritional value.

    We used to feed Petigree to our dogs, but after i educated myself on holistic quality foods, we switched, and our "kids" look so much healthier now. Their coats are just gorgeous.
  • ArmsandLegs

    Posts: 125

    Feb 03, 2010 2:12 AM GMT
    Depending on your dogs needs/requirements, both Natural Balance and Taste of the Wild are excellent grain free dog foods. The brand Professional is also an excellent food, but it does contain barley, so if your dog is sensitive to gluten that won't work for you.

    For the price that is charged for it, Science Diet isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Many vet's will reccommend it, but mainly that is because Hill's (the company that owns science diet) payed for part if not all of their vet schooling.

    But for a general rule of thumb, avoid dog foods that contain wheat, corn, soy and by-products.

    (Corn isn't necessarily bad for the dog, it is just used as a filler. Dogs can only digest about 5% of the corn, so the other 95% is waste that you have to pick up!)
  • IdkMyBffJill

    Posts: 148

    Feb 03, 2010 2:39 AM GMT
    DCEric saidWe make the cat food ourselves, it's cheaper and we control what she eats. Also, she knows when we cook her food because she gets comfortable in the kitchen and watches. She doesn't do that when we cook our food.


    I'm sure you are already aware - but I feel obligated to mention. Please be sure you are following a meal plan put together by a licensed veterinary nutritionist. Cats have several specific dietary requirements (such as Taurine, for one example, that if not provided via diet can lead to dilated cardiomyopathy, retinal degeneration, etc.).
  • danisnotstr8

    Posts: 2579

    Feb 03, 2010 2:41 AM GMT
    Danisnotstr8 prefers ALPO.
  • IdkMyBffJill

    Posts: 148

    Feb 03, 2010 2:42 AM GMT
    ArmsandLegs said
    For the price that is charged for it, Science Diet isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Many vet's will reccommend it, but mainly that is because Hill's (the company that owns science diet) payed for part if not all of their vet schooling.


    Simply false. There is a $5,000 and one $20,000 scholarship that can be applied for annually, which hundreds of students apply for. And they've been known to buy us free (people) food. Otherwise, not-so-much.

    I have no idea what they offered in the "old days" but currently, this is not at all true. The cost of a veterinary education ranges from $100-200K (roughly), and most of us don't get a cent from Hills. Those who do, it makes up a small portion of their total cost of attendance.
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    Feb 03, 2010 2:43 AM GMT

    We're using a locally made food. However Wellness has never had a recall problem (like the melamine horror) and only uses human grade ingredients. That's right - if there's a global meltdown you can eat it. icon_wink.gif
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    Feb 03, 2010 2:50 AM GMT
    I buy Canidae.

    No organ meats means fewer processed toxins.

    A 35 pound bag is about $43.00. You can also get a gluten free, low carb, high protein salmon mix for a little more. Makes the kitchen smell like a fish market, however.

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    Feb 03, 2010 2:56 AM GMT

    Congratulations on your new pup !

    Lesson 1: two 'dog people' are only ever going to agree on one thing: that the third 'dog person' is doing everything wrong.

    Lesson 2: like cars, dog food brands come in 'classes' and, within classes, which one to go with is largely a matter of personal preference.

    Among the top class (BMW, Mercedes, Lexus): California Naturals, Innova, Solid Gold, LID (Limited Ingredient Diet), EVO, Healthwise, Mother Nature, Karma, Wellness, Blue Seal, Organix, Eagle Pack and Canidae.

    Middle Tier (Toyota, Honda, VW, Ford): Nutro, Science Diet, Costco (Kirkland)

    There is a pretty wide price gap between those two tiers and between them and the bottom rung (pretty much anything you can buy in a supermarket).

    The general rule of thumb is that you want to avoid anything with wheat in it and anything like 'animal products', etc as others have pointed out.

    Two of my three dogs could probably thrive on anything. The third has a very delicate gut and was almost killed a year ago when a manufacturer changed the formula of their food and didn't announce it. For a while I had two of the dogs on a lower cost food and the sensitive one on a single-protein no wheat kibble. Then I became worried that a mix up in the food bowls could kill the one with allergies and put them all on the 'higher grade' more expensive food (California Naturals Herring and Sweet Potato.

    Your vet mentioned Diamond because they were at the epicenter of a 2005 nightmare in which melamine made its way into animal meal from China. A number of dogs died and many more suffered severe kidney damage. I have several dog trainer colleagues who continue to use Diamond food because ounce for ounce it's one of the least expensive high protein kibbles out there.

    If you're going to switch from Diamond, you might want to try the Kirkland brand. A rescue I work with uses it with no problems.

    Here's a link to a magazine that, among other things obsesses about dog foods. http://www.whole-dog-journal.com/issues/13_2/features/Best-Dry-Dog-Food-Whole-Dog-Journal_16196-1.html

    It accepts no advertising or fees from manufacturers. I just looked through my back issues and don't seem to have any of their past annual reviews of foods.

    Hope that helps.

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    Feb 03, 2010 2:57 AM GMT
    royal canine! by far the best!