Why time flies as you get older ---

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    Feb 03, 2010 7:47 PM GMT
    I thought it was just me at first, but I'm glad to know that it's universal experience.

    http://www.wbur.org/npr/122322542

    Why Does Time Fly By As You Get Older?
    By Robert Krulwich
    Published February 1, 2010 12:02 PM

    [...]
    As people get older, "they just have this sense, this feeling that time is going faster than they are," says Warren Meck, a psychology professor at Duke University.

    This seems to be true across cultures, across time, all over the world.

    No one is sure where this feeling comes from.

    Scientists have theories, of course, and one of them is that when you experience something for the very first time, more details, more information gets stored in your memory. Think about your first kiss.

    Neuroscientist David Eagleman of Baylor College of Medicine says that since the touch of the lips, the excitement, the taste, the smell — everything about this moment is novel — you aren't embroidering a bank of previous experiences, you are starting fresh.

    Have you noticed, he says, that when you recall your first kisses, early birthdays, your earliest summer vacations, they seem to be in slow motion? "I know when I look back on a childhood summer, it seems to have lasted forever," he says.

    That's because when it's the "first", there are so many things to remember. The list of encoded memories is so dense, reading them back gives you a feeling that they must have taken forever. But that's an illusion. "It's a construction of the brain," says Eagleman. "The more memory you have of something, you think, 'Wow, that really took a long time!'

    "Of course, you can see this in everyday life," says Eagleman, "when you drive to your new workplace for the first time and it seems to take a really long time to get there. But when you drive back and forth to your work every day after that, it takes no time at all, because you're not really writing it down anymore. There's nothing novel about it."

    That may be because the brain records new experiences - especially novel and exciting experiences - differently. This is even measurable. Eagleman's lab has found that brains use more energy to represent a memory when the memory is novel.

    So, first memories are dense. The routines of later life are sketchy. The past wasn't really slower than the present. It just feels that way.
    [...]
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 03, 2010 8:38 PM GMT
    The way to make time not go by so fast then is to continue to have new experiences. Notice how a weekend of camping -- with the people you meet, the conversations you have, the places you go, the things you see -- seems to last longer than a weekend of staying home and watching a movie one night.

    So get experiencing new stuff people! Force yourself.
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    Feb 03, 2010 10:41 PM GMT
    Hmmm, interesting....
    What, it's almost three oclock already?! Gotta go!
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    Feb 03, 2010 10:43 PM GMT
    That breeze you feel is from the pages of the calendar turning rapidly as you sit idly by.
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    Feb 03, 2010 10:53 PM GMT
    just go into deep freeze and put a timer on for a thousand years sounds like a pretty good cure
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:02 PM GMT
    It's certainly a universal experience, but I have to say that Mr. Krulwich's theory's sounds like a lot of silly horse shit to me.

    Here's my silly horse shit theory, one that is a lot simpler than his:

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 1-year-old's life: 100%

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 2-year-old's life: 50%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 20-year-old's life: 5%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 50-year-old's life: 2%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 70-year-old's life: 1.4%



    It's just arithmetic. Specifically: just division.

    And there you have my theory.

    * sticks out tongue *

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    Feb 03, 2010 11:11 PM GMT
    Okay, I'm not gonna lie, I didn't read the article, as I just have my own perspective on this, so I don't know if it lines up with the OP or not, but:

    I think time always goes by faster with each passing year due to your own concept of time. When I was 6, a summer break of the total of two months would feel like FOREVER. This is because I had only gone through 5 previous summers in my life, 2 or three of which I would have any memory of. Therefore, in my perception of my short six years on earth at that time, 2 months is a fairly large chunk of time.

    Now, where I am 22, having gone through more years and months, I have more time to compare my experiences with, thus, two months will pass without me even noticing. Like, it's already february 2010, what the fuck?! Where did that time go?

    But having experienced many more months in my lifetime, the passing of a month (or two) takes up significantly less time of my entire life than it had previously. And so, with age, this becomes a natural progression.

    The older you are, the more time on earth you have to use as a comparison for the time that passes.

    Anyway, that's just my two cents.
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:14 PM GMT
    As you get older, your life becomes more routine. I agree, break up the monotony and live a little. I don't think it would necessarily slow down the time, but your life is what you make iticon_cool.gif
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:15 PM GMT
    iguanaSF saidIt's certainly a universal experience, but I have to say that Mr. Krulwich's theory's sounds like a lot of silly horse shit to me.

    Here's my silly horse shit theory, one that is a lot simpler than his:

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 1-year-old's life: 100%

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 2-year-old's life: 50%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 20-year-old's life: 5%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 50-year-old's life: 2%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 70-year-old's life: 1.4%



    It's just arithmetic. Specifically: just division.

    And there you have my theory.

    * sticks out tongue *



    Hey, we have the same theory, except you presented it in a more scientific basis, whereas I ranted.

    So, in short, I agree.
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:18 PM GMT
    Whatever the phenomena is it's true for me and everyone else my age or older experience when I've asked them.
    I think I first really clicked onto this about 3 years ago when I got the sense that everyday seemed to be turning into trash day. Tuesdays in our case and I'd see our neighbor hauling his bins out to the curb. Next day it would seem I'd be having my morning coffee and there's neighbor hauling his bins to the curb again and it's like "where did the week go" he just did that yesterday.
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:20 PM GMT
    I thought it had to do with the volume contained in the vas deference.
    More volume you have the slower the clock ticks.
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:27 PM GMT
    Damn iguanaSF and MeOhMy beat me to it, I had the same theory, however I also believe its also due to the amount of memory you absorb, example, a child at 10 has a mind like a sponge and is constantly learning new things about the world around him, however an 18 year old has less pressure to learn things because he has fully matured, i.e there is less basic info required to learn. life is like a big lesson, and like all subjects the hardest and most info dense seem to take longer to do than the easy stuff.
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    Feb 03, 2010 11:44 PM GMT
    Remember Christmas as a kid,,, marking off the days of the December calendar and it seemed to take FOREVER to get to the 25th LOL
    Now it comes and goes in an instant.
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    Feb 04, 2010 1:03 AM GMT
    Hmm.. Yeah, I guess I should go out try new things more often. icon_lol.gif
  • Nodak

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    Feb 04, 2010 1:38 AM GMT
    I have also had the same theory ans IguanaSF.
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    Feb 04, 2010 2:00 AM GMT
    iguanaSF saidIt's certainly a universal experience, but I have to say that Mr. Krulwich's theory's sounds like a lot of silly horse shit to me.

    Here's my silly horse shit theory, one that is a lot simpler than his:

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 1-year-old's life: 100%

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 2-year-old's life: 50%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 20-year-old's life: 5%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 50-year-old's life: 2%

    ...

    o 1 year as a percentage of a 70-year-old's life: 1.4%



    It's just arithmetic. Specifically: just division.

    And there you have my theory.

    * sticks out tongue *



    correct or not, i have always believed this theory too.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 04, 2010 3:02 AM GMT
    Get over it. You're going to die sooner than later. Make the most of what comes between then and now or die with regrets.
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    Feb 04, 2010 3:03 AM GMT
    barriehomeboy saidGet over it. You're going to die sooner than later. Make the most of what comes between then and now or die with regrets.


    omg_wtf_-300x280.jpg
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Feb 04, 2010 3:04 AM GMT
    media_httpicanhascheezburgerfileswordpre
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 04, 2010 3:06 AM GMT
    Sieze the day.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 04, 2010 3:06 AM GMT
    im only 23 and i feel soo old......and i just cant fathom being in my 40s..and im constantly thinking of my future..if ill have kids or not..its just a head hurting thing..."growing up"....It was only yesterday i didnt have to do anything...parents were always there giving me a free ride..now i have to have a job....its like mandatory all of a sudden...i have to be thinking of my retirement..lol...its sad..
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 04, 2010 3:09 AM GMT
    carpe diem?
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 04, 2010 3:11 AM GMT
    your future is right now. This minute You're alive at this minute. In this chat room. In your living room or basement or wherever you are.
  • barriehomeboy

    Posts: 2475

    Feb 04, 2010 3:11 AM GMT
    A pinrpick two seconds from now would not affect your
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 04, 2010 3:12 AM GMT

    whystilltalking.jpg


    don't you have a day to seize?