Pose running

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    Feb 04, 2010 6:52 AM GMT
    Anyone doing this?
    A friend of mine recommended it and I haven't found anything really clear on the technique but I have a vague idea. It seems like you run almost bending forward to have gravity pull you into your next step and using more your ankles to bounce the steps than really pushing off into it.

    The idea is that you'll be using less energy by having gravity do a bit of the work.

    edit: linky linky http://www.posetech.com/
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    Feb 04, 2010 7:41 AM GMT
    Yeah, that's the basic idea behind Pose running. Instead of driving your body forward, you're almost falling forward and catching yourself.

    And instead of kicking your feet back high, you're just lifting your foot/leg up (like a flamingo) and waiting for gravity to take over.

    It takes time to get it right. I'm not quite there yet. icon_neutral.gif
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    Feb 04, 2010 2:20 PM GMT
    interesting, thanks.
    while i didn't know the technique per say, much corresponds to what i had been told for proper running : minimal ground contact, never see your own feet while running ( which favors short strides ), quiet running ( not this heavy stump we often hear in gyms )
    Keeping the body straight up of course makes sense, if only for proper "belly" breathing , keeping the thoracic cage opened and allowing good diaphragm movement ( feels like a horizontal 8 figure) while your legs move freely under you.



    this is all i found :
    THE BASICS

    * Lean machine: At all times, angle your body forward to the point where you feel you're about to fall. Do not bend at the waist. To go faster, lean more.

    * S-shaped body form: Run with your back straight and your knees slightly bent at all times, including at impact. You should run at a height two or three inches shorter than your normal standing height.

    * Short stride: Your foot should land under your body, not ahead of it. Remember that "distal" (far from body) equals weak, poor leverage, while close to core equals strength and good balance.

    * Land on forefoot, not heel: Initially contact the ground only on the ball of the foot. Landing on the heel transmits maximum shock and has a momentum-killing "braking" effect

    * Fast cadence: Minimum leg turnover should be 180 to 190 strides per minute. Increase as you get fitter and want to go faster. Remember: The longer the foot's on the ground, the more momentum you lose.

    * Pull, not push: This is the hardest-to-master part of the pose technique. After the foot strike, pull the heel straight up in the direction of the butt by contracting the hamstring. It should go up like a rubber band. Fight the urge to push off from the toes as you normally do, instead using the quads and calves.

    * Flick it: Don't yank the foot up; flick it up just enough to get it off the ground an inch or so. It will continue upward on its own; the faster you're running, the higher it goes.

    * Free fall: Once airborne, don't reach with your stride. You're in flight, carried along by your center of mass. The foot will travel in a natural arc, then drop like a plumb line without any muscle activity.

    /EDIT

    i just watched a series of YT videos on Pose and went out and applied myself to do them. Wow, this will take a few adjustments but it does feel really good. However i have to transition, because the calf muscles and hamstrings seem to be more solicited .
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    Feb 06, 2010 4:52 AM GMT
    You could also try chi running which is a very similar form. If you're changing your form, it's best to do it gradually.
  • UStriathlete

    Posts: 320

    Feb 06, 2010 5:24 AM GMT
    i agree Chi running is good.

    Pose is a bunch of crap.unless you're running short distances, under 5k, it's ok.

    a few tips, for long distance running form.

    high cadence (depending on height 5'6and under 100-110, 5'7-5'10 95-100, etc)

    just don't break, as in run light and quite and smooth, think like a wheel, you can stil heel strike, just don't pound the heel in to the ground icon_smile.gif even forefoot strikers can pound/break

    let the hips move free, when rt hips moves forward the rt. leg follows, left does the opposite, moves back.

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    Feb 06, 2010 5:39 AM GMT
    Stay away from pose.
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    Feb 06, 2010 6:34 AM GMT
    UStriathlete saidi agree Chi running is good.

    Pose is a bunch of crap.unless you're running short distances, under 5k, it's ok.

    a few tips, for long distance running form.

    high cadence (depending on height 5'6and under 100-110, 5'7-5'10 95-100, etc)

    just don't break, as in run light and quite and smooth, think like a wheel, you can stil heel strike, just don't pound the heel in to the ground icon_smile.gif even forefoot strikers can pound/break

    let the hips move free, when rt hips moves forward the rt. leg follows, left does the opposite, moves back.



    that's my traditional way of running, but a lower cadence, i'm 6'2" .
    i've never counted to say the truth, but it doesn't feel like a 90 cadence.
    but i know i feel like that little martian guy in Bugs Bunny.
    the posture i have basically from a singing background , proper breathing , allowing diaphragm to work correctly, rib cage open , never collapsing.
    feeling the horizontal 8 motion as air goes in and out.
    when i realized i could run and breathe as a singer ( well almost, singing technique is bit more elaborate as air out is stretched over long phrases while air in is almost instantaneous and when well done, practically silent ) i felt pressure taken off the legs which then felt like they had a life of their own under me.
    the hip rotation i got from a runner who once passed me and it caught my eye. so i mimicked him and , what do you know, i was going faster without any extra effort.. wonderful.
    Then i've put in time to make my running as silent as possible.
    I figured less noise = less impact.

    problem is how to address fatigue. When the body gets tired, in spite of staying focused, little things start to give way.

    I'm going to try adapting the CHI technique into my running , mostly the slight pelvic tilt .
    so why is Pose not good?
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    Feb 07, 2010 5:24 PM GMT
    xassantex said However i have to transition, because the calf muscles and hamstrings seem to be more solicited .


    Yeah, that's what I've been experiencing as well.

    I'm curious as well, I know it was said that pose is good up to 5k, but can you elaborate on that?

    In the meantime though, I'll go ahead and look up chi running since that seems to be a good bet.

    Thanks for the responces guys!
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    Feb 08, 2010 5:06 PM GMT
    .-=after a few outings applying CHI =-.

    well, i have to confess i'm obviously missing some clues because i don't see much difference between CHI and Pose.
    You still use the ball of the foot, posture/pelvis position seem similar and that leaning forward as you go seem pretty much the same. Anyway so far, those are the principles i've applied . It does go slightly faster, but heart rate also goes a bit higher, so is that sustainable on longer runs .

    Now, all i've gathered info wise is from web sites and YouTube, so as usual , incomplete, superficial and probably infused with various bullshit.

    Is the book/dvd on CHI running any good, as anyone watched/read them ?
    They're all ca. $70 so i don't want to buy them unless they're quality.

    god, i have pedantic tendencies and i feel them resurfacing.. gah.
    think i'll just go get a life.icon_rolleyes.gif