70-year-old couple freezes to death in their backyard.

  • Little_Spoon

    Posts: 1562

    Feb 04, 2010 4:48 PM GMT
    I don't know the details of the incident.

    Apparently the women was hurt and the man just stayed out there with her and they froze to death.

    icon_cry.gif

    I actually teared up so badly when I heard about this?

    Did she ask him not to leave her after she hurt herself and he couldn't bring her back in the house? Why didn't he go back in and use a phone to call for help and just go back out to her with blankets and stuff?

    Why did this heartbreaking story have to happen?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 04, 2010 5:21 PM GMT
    Link to the story?
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Feb 04, 2010 5:23 PM GMT
    Clicky Pops
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 04, 2010 5:27 PM GMT
    It could have been disorientation or suicide.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 8:05 AM GMT
    Hmmm, that is sadicon_cry.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 4:20 PM GMT
    When I lived in North Dakota, near the Minnesota border and not far from Canada, too, this sort of thing sadly happened all the time. People suffering from senility or Alzheimer's would wander out of their homes, often in their nightclothes, and in -30F air temps they would become immobile in mere minutes, and dead in under 30. Hardly a week went by that you didn't read such a story, and sometimes about little toddlers, too, who had blundered outside by themselves and couldn't get back in, found frozen on the back steps within minutes of their being noticed missing. Heartbreaking.

    My own late mother-in-law was found in her bathrobe on the streets of Grand Forks, ND several times by the police late at night, suffering from the "night-time crazies" some Alzheimer's sufferers experience, leading to a court order to commit her to a lock-down unit in a nursing home, before she killed herself. And I volunteered in another nursing home in North Dakota, where the Alzheimer's wing could only be entered and exited by use of a pass code on the locked doors.

    But some married couples resist the nursing home, not wanting to be separated, not wanting to leave their own home for that sterile finality of the Alzheimer's ward. And they wait too long, and tragedy strikes. That could well be the case in this story. icon_sad.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 4:21 PM GMT
    I'd rather say it's love. Tragic.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 4:24 PM GMT
    The ending scene of the notebook was the first thing that came to mind reading this.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Feb 07, 2010 9:59 PM GMT
    This hits too close to home for me, and brings me a few tears. I had a great aunt who passed out from exhaustion while trying to walk home in a snowstorm and she froze to death. My uncle was in a wheel chair and couldn't get outside to help her. This was back in the early 1970's and she didn't know how to drive. I was very young at the time, but I remember my family being so upset. I won't ever forget it. icon_cry.gif