BACHELOR Birds and SINGLE Squids

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 07, 2010 9:52 PM GMT
    Hey, this came to mind last night. Do you think there are a lot of animals that never find a mate, or look for a mate? I wonder what percentage of birds never pair up. Has there been a study?
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    Feb 08, 2010 1:39 AM GMT
    *bump* I want an answer. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 08, 2010 1:40 AM GMT
    i dunno but my (caged) bird looks pretty lonely icon_confused.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 08, 2010 3:14 AM GMT
    ddt8665 saidi dunno but my (caged) bird looks pretty lonely icon_confused.gif


    I don't know either, but I do know why the caged bird kills.




    Cuhrazy Caged Bird? Pictures, Images and Photos
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    Feb 08, 2010 3:23 AM GMT
    I used to be a naughty little kid who would play with the baby birds in the nests... I'm pretty sure some of them were eventually killed because of me. They never found a mate icon_sad.gif
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    Feb 08, 2010 3:30 AM GMT
    JoeB1986 saidI used to be a naughty little kid who would play with the baby birds in the nests... I'm pretty sure some of them were eventually killed because of me. They never found a mate icon_sad.gif


    You sick bastard. OK, you can make up for it by sending pictures of your legs for my book..GREAT MALE LEGS. icon_wink.gif

    http://www.wrestlemen.com/legs
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    Feb 08, 2010 5:44 AM GMT
    For a lot of territorial animals, young adult males (unless patricidal) are ejected from their parents territory. They can travel long distances and lead to reported sightings outside the normal range of the species. They can come to a bad end (e.g. young cougars who come down to the valleys and kill sheep and dogs until someone hunts them down.) Rarely, they hook up with a mate who also wandered in that direction, and the range of the species is extended.
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    Feb 09, 2010 2:56 AM GMT
    Why does it matter though.

    The few birds (and animals) who do mate for life often have this adaptation simply because one or both of the pair often has to spend a lot of time minding the nest or the young (incubating, protecting, feeding etc.), thus having a life mate ups the chances of their offspring and the parents surviving.

    Not to mention that most animals aren't perpetually 'in heat' like humans anyway. They mate on very specific periods, usually once or twice in a year (The 'mating seasons'), and then for the rest of the year have no sexual urges whatsoever. In some species like turtles, these mating cycles alternate with several years in between, for salmons this mating season only happens once in their life - the moment just before they die. Some can also turn off the mating instincts when there is no potential mate around, effectively turning the energies of libido into something more useful - like surviving.

    To humans it would be something like being asexual most of the year then suddenly turning into a ferociously horny rapist once every second thursday of november or something, haha.

    So yeah, 'bachelor' animals aren't really that mystifying. They probably aren't even one bit lonely.

    There is also a particular phenomenon among birds (and other animals besides, especially ones which do not mate for life) called 'lekking'.

    It is when bachelor male birds cluster around the other bachelor male birds, in hopes of upping their chances of finding their own mate.
  • WILDCARD73

    Posts: 545

    Feb 09, 2010 3:10 AM GMT

    you need to watch animal planet
    and more documentaries about animals and insects

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    Feb 09, 2010 3:29 AM GMT
    WILDCARD73 said
    you need to watch animal planet
    and more documentaries about animals and insects



    You need to kiss my ass. icon_wink.gif

    Though very insightful responses, I still want to know what percentages of animals never even look for a mate. For instance, a bluejay, etc.
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    Feb 09, 2010 3:46 AM GMT
    I went outside to take a survey for you, but couldn't get a straight answer from any of the birds. The only thing accomplished was more strange looks from the neighbors. You really shouldn't make these requests when I am already the neighborhood oddball.
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    Feb 09, 2010 6:11 AM GMT
    1and3Chairs saidCaged!

    I have that shirt!


    lol
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    Feb 09, 2010 6:14 AM GMT
    wrestlervic said
    JoeB1986 saidI used to be a naughty little kid who would play with the baby birds in the nests... I'm pretty sure some of them were eventually killed because of me. They never found a mate icon_sad.gif


    You sick bastard. OK, you can make up for it by sending pictures of your legs for my book..GREAT MALE LEGS. icon_wink.gif

    http://www.wrestlemen.com/legs


    Haha I'll be sure to send some leggy pics when some are taken. I'll be in Puerto Rico for a week @ the end of next month so shorts will be worn! lol
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Feb 10, 2010 3:26 AM GMT

    not true ... the squid is reserved for the whale. hence:

    squid.gif
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    Feb 10, 2010 3:34 AM GMT
    icon_lol.gif
    1and3Chairs saidCaged!

    I have that shirt!

    icon_lol.gif