Damn, I'm tired of getting toasted.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 09, 2010 2:53 AM GMT
    Is it just me or does anyone else get toasted/sunburned MORE when you apply sunblock??? And i'm not using whimpy ass sunblock, I'm using spf 90 on my ass.

    It's not even summer yet and I already got sunburned. I'm I the only one with this kind of skin?
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    Feb 09, 2010 3:13 AM GMT
    sunblock causes cancer.....
  • mcwclewis

    Posts: 1701

    Feb 09, 2010 4:18 AM GMT
    Wow it's like 9 degrees out right now... definately not worried about it at the moment icon_razz.gif



    When It's warm enough to worry about it though, not I actually have the exact opposite problem. If I wear any kind of sunblock I don't get even the slightest bit of color
  • Webster666

    Posts: 9217

    Feb 09, 2010 6:46 AM GMT
    When I use sunscreen, the sun feels hotter on my skin.
    If you're out for a long time (hours), use a sun block, and you'll still get a tan.
    Also, buy a bottle of plain green aloe vera gel (in the hand lotion section of your drugstore) to slather on after you sun. It will kill the burn, and save your ass. LOL.
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    Feb 09, 2010 7:08 AM GMT
    Webster666 saidWhen I use sunscreen, the sun feels hotter on my skin.
    If you're out for a long time (hours), use a sun block, and you'll still get a tan.
    Also, buy a bottle of plain green aloe vera gel (in the hand lotion section of your drugstore) to slather on after you sun. It will kill the burn, and save your ass. LOL.



    When you wear a "sunblock" it tends to block your pores and inhibits your ability to perspire freely, reducing your body's ability to cool, by evaporation....so you feel hotter.....
    As a very fair skinned, "strawberry-blond", easily burned person...I wear SPF-30 and a light colored, shirt that wicks... and reduce my time in the strongest sun...... and by the way....DRINK LOTS OF WATER!....just being in the sunlight will dehydrate you and your skin...part of the burn!icon_biggrin.gif
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:14 AM GMT
    I must admit. I being so white, and one who lives on a hot dry Island Oz, just about never use sunblock Yes if I don't take care I burn, and have been in hospital from sunburn. But I still just about never use a sunblock. I wear hats, and long sleeves in the heat of the day.
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:33 AM GMT
    You get what you pay for - SPF 90 doesn't mean anything in terms of all damage. Some 15s' with broad spectrum range are more effective.
    I suggest that you get your sunblock from a dermatologist. Certain products are sold only through the docs office (not prescription) - the over the counter stuff is often unregulated, out of date ( in terms of research/content ) and overpriced to boot.
    My skin doc gave me "Anthelios 60" - it contains the five most effective sunscreens to protect against the greatest range of damaging rays - I paid $25 dollars for it and thought it was expensive at the time ( this product is for face and neck ) it's lasted me 5 months - that's cheaper than a lot of over the counter stuff.
    My mom and two brothers have all had growths removed - I'm not taking any chances.
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    Feb 09, 2010 9:04 AM GMT
    I burn like a Frenchman, sadly. I want to try and get a tan this summer, show off my sexiness (relative to last summer), but I doubt it will work.

    When I opened this thread, I thought you meant something entirely else by "toasted." Needless to say, I was somewhat relieved. Who would get tired of being toasted?
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    Feb 09, 2010 9:49 AM GMT
    I know what you mean. I never, ever burn when I'm in the sun (with or without sunblock).

    But one time I thought it would be safer to build a base tan by going to a tanning place. Wrong! It looked like I was the main course at Dan Tana's. I'll take my chances with the sun any day now in comparison.

    Sometimes it's better not to fool with what works.
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:34 PM GMT
    Use a physical sunblock, not a chemical sunblock.

    Physical sunblocks use zinc oxide or some other mineral to deflect UV rays. Chemical sunblocks absorb UV rays and lose effectiveness after a time period. So it's still possible to tan/burn.
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:44 PM GMT
    What is sunblock?
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:56 PM GMT
    http://www.nutralegacy.com/blog/general-healthcare/truth-about-spf-sun-protection-factor/

    Sun Protection Factor or SPF is a particular number on sunscreen labels indicating how long the lotion will protect your skin from the sun’s harmful UVB rays and, therefore, sunburn. However, sunburn is the least of your potential worries. These UVB rays are the major cause of sun damaged skin leading to wrinkles, freckles, aging skin and age spots. They can also affect your eyes and the body’s immune system. The worst-case-scenario is skin cancer.

    Some countries have developed indexes that help forecast the intensity of UV rays. In the meantime, beach lovers and other outdoorsy types have sunscreens. But, these lotions are not miracle cures nor are they guaranteed safegaurds. The sun protection factor on a product’s label is merely a meter that allows tanning to ensue without overexposure to the sun. Many people believe that the higher the SPF number, the better the protection.

    Nevertheless, the SPF doesn’t necessarily translate to a time limit in the sun. If you use SPF 30 instead of SPF 15, it does not mean that you can stay in the sun for that much longer. These numbers merely indicate the percentage of UVB ray filtration. Practically, SPF 15 products filter out 93 % of UVB rays while SPF 30 products filter 97%. This percentage decreases due to factors such as different types of skin, humidity, sweat and any contact with water. So, after a couple of hours, both SPF 15 and SPF 30 become ineffective and the difference between the two minimizes.

    Just how long do you stay in the scorching sun? Your sunscreen may be SPF 15, 30 or more, but people with light skin usually notice some redness after 20 minutes. So, if you’re using SPF 30, then your equation would go something like this: SPF 30 x 20 min = 600 min/60 = 10 hours. In other words, you have some, albeit small, level of sun protection for almost 10 hours. Remember, it may take up to 24 hours to see a severe sunburn.
    About SPF Factors
    You know your own body. Be mindful of your complexion and the levels of melanin in your skin when approximating your sun tanning sessions. Melanin is one such chemical that helps in absorbing the UV rays. It determines a human’s skin color and people across the globe have a vast array of complexions due to varying levels of melanin. Therefore, they tan at different rates.

    So, before you run off to the beach or your summer home for a dip in the lake, take a few precautions. Apply suntan lotion with a high SPF at least 20 minutes before going out in the sun, re-apply if necessary and wear branded sunglasses to protect your eyes from those damaging UV rays.
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    Feb 09, 2010 8:56 PM GMT