The mathematics of it all?

  • Aus92

    Posts: 328

    Feb 09, 2010 6:01 AM GMT
    I am lost when it comes to understanding weight loss... I try to eat healthy and excercise but all the confusing stuff behind it always gets me.

    Like... how can you find out how many calories are in a product? How many calories must to burn to lose x amount of weight...

    Can anyone give me a crash course of the simple things?
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Feb 09, 2010 1:51 PM GMT

    EFF! you've mentioned mathematics and you are just going to leave it there? no. no, I say; nay!

    Gauss:

    300px-EM15-2.jpg

    Riemann:

    300px-Riemann_sum_convergence.png

    Lagrange:

    13e621ae0aaba27face8a23eb4a7a5f8.png

    the quasi-satellite:
    Orbits_of_Cruithne_and_Earth.gif

    DiffEq:

    slope fields - yay!
    250px-Slope_Field.png

    Operations Research & Linear Programming:

    the bilevel program and the pivot element

    ... there. much better.
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    Feb 09, 2010 1:54 PM GMT
    wow really JRS? haha

    that just made me laugh.



  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Feb 09, 2010 1:57 PM GMT
    kaicho saidwow really JRS? haha
    that just made me laugh.

    I am a certified:

    mp_CMUG_179W_MATH_ST_CEMG_3300.jpg

    I can't wait for March, 14th:

    w28763015.jpg
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    Feb 09, 2010 4:05 PM GMT
    Sexylurv saidI am lost when it comes to understanding weight loss... I try to eat healthy and excercise but all the confusing stuff behind it always gets me.

    Like... how can you find out how many calories are in a product? How many calories must to burn to lose x amount of weight...

    Can anyone give me a crash course of the simple things?


    I recommend doing Weight Watchers because they teach you to do exactly that. icon_smile.gif
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    Feb 09, 2010 4:23 PM GMT
    Sexylurv saidI am lost when it comes to understanding weight loss... I try to eat healthy and excercise but all the confusing stuff behind it always gets me.

    Like... how can you find out how many calories are in a product? How many calories must to burn to lose x amount of weight...

    Can anyone give me a crash course of the simple things?


    First, you have to know what your maintenance level of calories is (i.e. you don't lose or gain weight). Then you have to consume less than that and/or expend more energy to lose weight. Given a level of exercise, you have to consume fewer calories than you expend and you'll lose weight. Simple really.

    I calculated my TDEE as a starting point to find my maintenance calories, then adjusted up/down to gain/lose weight. TDEE can be calculated here: http://www.fitnessfrog.com/calculators.html

    As far as knowing how many calories are in a product use the nutrition label and track what you are eating. It helps to keep a food log. I used to use www.sparkpeople.com to log my food everday so i knew exactly how much i was eating and what the ratio of carbs/protein/fat was. They have a ton of food in the database and you can add your own too. After a while you get it dialed and know how much you should eat without logging it.

    The bottom line: get a total daily calorie goal, split it into carbs/protein/fat, eat 6 meals, exercise and be anal about your nutrition. The weight loss will follow...
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Feb 09, 2010 4:36 PM GMT
    If you choose not to get involved with a program like Weight Watchers, which does indeed teach you these things:

    If you're eating a packaged food, look at the label. It will tell you how many calories are in a serving, and how many servings are in a package. Calories per serving * number of servings in a package = number of calories in the package.

    If you're eating food you cook yourself, try a site like fitday.com, which will include nutritional information for pretty much anything you can think of.

    To lose weight, you must burn more calories than you consume. If your weight is currently stable, you are naturally consuming and burning roughly equal numbers of calories. If you want to lose fat, you will need to increase the amount you burn and decrease the amount you consume. 1 pound of fat = 3,500 nutritional calories. So if every day you eat 300 calories fewer than you normally would, and burn 200 more than you normally would, you will lose an average of 1 pound of fat in a week. You can burn 200 calories by walking 2 miles, which you can probably do in half an hour. You can consume 300 fewer calories in a number of ways -- it depends on what you're currently consuming -- but even something like skipping a 16 oz frappuccino from Starbucks will do it. It is not recommended to operate on a daily deficit of more than 500, as that can lead your body to go into starvation mode and slow down its metabolism.
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    Feb 12, 2010 3:58 PM GMT
    JASFIT said
    Sexylurv saidI am lost when it comes to understanding weight loss... I try to eat healthy and excercise but all the confusing stuff behind it always gets me.

    Like... how can you find out how many calories are in a product? How many calories must to burn to lose x amount of weight...

    Can anyone give me a crash course of the simple things?


    First, you have to know what your maintenance level of calories is (i.e. you don't lose or gain weight). Then you have to consume less than that and/or expend more energy to lose weight. Given a level of exercise, you have to consume fewer calories than you expend and you'll lose weight. Simple really.

    I calculated my TDEE as a starting point to find my maintenance calories, then adjusted up/down to gain/lose weight. TDEE can be calculated here: http://www.fitnessfrog.com/calculators.html

    As far as knowing how many calories are in a product use the nutrition label and track what you are eating. It helps to keep a food log. I used to use www.sparkpeople.com to log my food everday so i knew exactly how much i was eating and what the ratio of carbs/protein/fat was. They have a ton of food in the database and you can add your own too. After a while you get it dialed and know how much you should eat without logging it.

    The bottom line: get a total daily calorie goal, split it into carbs/protein/fat, eat 6 meals, exercise and be anal about your nutrition. The weight loss will follow...


    According to the TDEE formula, if I exercised 3-5 days a week my TDEE would be 4654. So, if I wanted to lose 5 pounds of fat a week I would need to consume 2150 calories a day. So, how would I figure out the carb/protein/fat split?
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Feb 12, 2010 4:01 PM GMT
    Onthewaytome said
    According to the TDEE formula, if I exercised 3-5 days a week my TDEE would be 4654. So, if I wanted to lose 5 pounds of fat a week I would need to consume 2150 calories a day. So, how would I figure out the carb/protein/fat split?


    You don't, because as we keep telling you, you are not going to sustain losing 5 pounds of fat per week.
  • DCEric

    Posts: 3713

    Feb 12, 2010 4:03 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidYou don't, because as we keep telling you, you are not going to sustain losing 5 pounds of fat per week.


    jillian-michaels-and-bob-harper.jpg
    Disagree with you.
    /Not that doing that is anywhere close to healthy.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Feb 12, 2010 4:05 PM GMT
    Ahh, but were they truly losing 5 pounds of fat per week, or were they losing large amounts of muscle and water in addition to some fat?
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Feb 12, 2010 4:08 PM GMT
    In a slightly less glib answer for the general audience, the standard nutritionist advice is that in a maintenance diet, you're looking somewhere in the neighborhood of 60% carbs, 30% fat, 10% protein. When either losing weight or gaining muscle, you typically increase the protein to around 30% and decrease the carbs to around 40%. When losing weight, this helps protect you from metabolizing muscle for energy; when gaining weight, it provides you the necessary building blocks of muscle in the first place.
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    Feb 12, 2010 4:33 PM GMT
    @ jrs1: you are clearly certified... icon_lol.gif

    @ sexyluvr & Onthewaytome: take JASFIT and BioNerd's advice. Consider weightwatcher's as a starting point to get into some good habits. But JUST START A REAL PROGRAM. Nothing will happen if you endlessly research. JUST DO IT. icon_wink.gificon_exclaim.gif
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    Feb 12, 2010 5:13 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd said
    Onthewaytome said
    According to the TDEE formula, if I exercised 3-5 days a week my TDEE would be 4654. So, if I wanted to lose 5 pounds of fat a week I would need to consume 2150 calories a day. So, how would I figure out the carb/protein/fat split?


    You don't, because as we keep telling you, you are not going to sustain losing 5 pounds of fat per week.


    I can sustain it in the beginning. Then, when it gets rough I'll go to four, then 3, then two, then 1 pound a week and adjust accordingly.
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    Feb 12, 2010 5:31 PM GMT
    DCEric said
    MSUBioNerd saidYou don't, because as we keep telling you, you are not going to sustain losing 5 pounds of fat per week.


    jillian-michaels-and-bob-harper.jpg
    Disagree with you.
    /Not that doing that is anywhere close to healthy.


    Jillian actually says in her book that there's nothing wrong with fast weight loss as long as you're not starving yourself.
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    Feb 13, 2010 10:00 PM GMT
    Onthewaytome said
    DCEric said
    MSUBioNerd saidYou don't, because as we keep telling you, you are not going to sustain losing 5 pounds of fat per week.


    jillian-michaels-and-bob-harper.jpg
    Disagree with you.
    /Not that doing that is anywhere close to healthy.


    Jillian actually says in her book that there's nothing wrong with fast weight loss as long as you're not starving yourself.


    I like the Biggest Loser as a show, and find it inspirational, but the reality is that the rest of us are not on a ranch where our food is prepared for us, with a kitchen full of stocked food, being pushed by trainers for 6-8 hours of exercise every day. We have jobs, lives, celebrations where food is served, busy times where we can't always make good choices when it comes to food, but have to make the best possible choice. WW (and other programs) teach you how to manage your weight loss and maintain it in real life.

    Since starting Weight Watches a month ago, I lost 3 lbs, 3 lbs, 4 lbs, 3 lbs, and this week 0.2 lbs. While it's hard to see that number, I remind myself that prior to starting WW, I was probably gaining a pound or two each week, so it's still going in the right direction.

    Part of what makes the Biggest Loser contestants lose so much weight so quickly is that most of them are morbidly obese. Toward the end of the show, the amount of weight loss each week slows. And, at least when I've watched it, those who start out thinner, tend to get kicked off, because they can't consistently lose such huge amounts of weight.