Bench pressing with dumbells

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    Feb 10, 2010 5:12 PM GMT
    I go to a new gym that is open 24 hours and i normally work out around midnight - 1:45 AM and the gym is always empty. I'm really trying to build up my arms and chest so i use dumbbells on the bench press instead of the bar and then right after i do flys. I use dumbbells because I'm afraid if an accident happens there's no one to help me off the bench.

    I know the dumbbells at my gym only go up to around 70 pounds a dumbbell. so i have a LONG way before I need anything heavier.


    I was just wondering what are the benefits of using the bar and not the dumbbells. Or if is there any difference at all.

    thanks.

    M
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    Feb 10, 2010 5:55 PM GMT
    a LA Fitness personal trainer once told me dumbbells are better than barbells if you can do your exercises in a stable condition. He also says with dumbbells, you likely to develop your body better in a long-run. Someone please confirm this.
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    Feb 10, 2010 6:38 PM GMT
    Of course dumbbells are better! You don't futz up your shoulders, you get full range of motion, and you work your stabilizers, too.
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    Feb 10, 2010 6:42 PM GMT
    Dumbbells support a full range of motion, require more stabilizer involvement, allow the muscle to be stretched (which affords for fuller development, and injury prevention) and can be dropped on the floor.

    Most folks are better served to do dumbbells in a 8 to 25 rep range, with 45 sec intervals, through a full range of motion. Partial movements really aren't a smart way to train. Don't be the gym idiot who swings heavy weights, or rolls his shoulders, etc. Lifting in that fashion allow hinders development, and makes injury more likely.

    A muscle that's stretched, and worked through a full range of motion, can be up to 30% LARGER than one without the same. Don't be an idiot with partial movements.

    You'll want to get off your ass and study up on hypertrophy and exercise science, yourself. Universities across the country have studied this in their exercise science programs, and with guys like me, for decades. This really isn't stuff that you should be spoon fed.
  • Latenight30

    Posts: 1525

    Feb 10, 2010 7:41 PM GMT
    A muscle that's stretched, and worked through a full range of motion, can be up to 30% LARGER than one without the same. Don't be an idiot with partial movements.

    Hey Chucky Stud,
    I have always been a proponent of full range of motion.
    Works for me.
    Whats up with these guys doing heavy weights and only 1/2 the range?
    It doesn't seem efficient in the overall goal.
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    Feb 10, 2010 7:48 PM GMT
    I like dumbells for the reason s chucky and a few others stated. I noticed a huge difference in strength and growth gains when i moved to dumbells.
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    Feb 10, 2010 8:26 PM GMT
    I rarely do barbell bench, it feels rough on my shoulders and i dont get as good of a workout. You also need a spot if you're gonna push yourself on barbell bench.
    I've been doing db bench since i was in wrestling and my coach told me to, after I saw the progress in my strength as ell as the size and tone of my pecs i never went back.
    now i rep with 100s, wish i could find some heavier dumbells haha
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    Feb 10, 2010 8:46 PM GMT
    As others have stated... I am a fan of using dumbells. Partially because I also work out alone... but mostly because changing weight is quicker and easier (I use the bowflex adjustable dumbells). I have read that control is essential when using dumbells, which would imply that one naturally has more control when using a barbell, who knows.

    Incidentally... I also immediately follow my dumbell bench press with fly's. Also, I switch it up with incline and decline, as this works and builds diffferent pectoral muscles (does anyone else have feedback on that?).
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    Feb 10, 2010 9:19 PM GMT
    I only use dumbbells in my pec workout.... i think it's safer and much more effective.
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    Feb 10, 2010 10:08 PM GMT
    so i guess that LA Fitness personal trainer was right after all... ^^
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    Feb 10, 2010 11:42 PM GMT
    :-) Works for me...

    9730_212229.jpg
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    Feb 10, 2010 11:57 PM GMT
    The barbell makes my arms wobbly for some reason..
  • PipHop

    Posts: 439

    Feb 11, 2010 12:10 AM GMT
    So dumb bells promote more of a thorough workout, but what if you don't want to get bigger, just stronger? My arm size is growing disproportionately to my chest size.
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:11 AM GMT
    PipHop saidSo dumb bells promote more of a thorough workout, but what if you don't want to get bigger, just stronger? My arm size is growing disproportionately to my chest size.


    Higher the rep, lower the weight. barbell or dumbell really dont matter here i think. Someone confirm this please lol
  • TexanMan82

    Posts: 893

    Feb 11, 2010 12:18 AM GMT
    ddt8665 said
    PipHop saidSo dumb bells promote more of a thorough workout, but what if you don't want to get bigger, just stronger? My arm size is growing disproportionately to my chest size.


    Higher the rep, lower the weight. barbell or dumbell really dont matter here i think. Someone confirm this please lol


    you have that backwards. Higher weight, lower rep.
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:19 AM GMT
    Higher reps, lower weight, through a complete range of motion, with a stretch, is what you want for maximal sarcolasmic hypertrophy (size). For strength, but, not size, you'll want lower reps, fewer sets. Strength does not equal size.

    Several of you have it backwards.

    There are two different types of muscular hypertrophy: sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar. During sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, the volume of sarcoplasmic fluid in the muscle cell increases with no accompanying increase in muscular strength. During myofibrillar hypertrophy, the myofibrils, being the actin and myosin contractile proteins, increase in number and add to muscular strength as well as a small increase in the size of the muscle. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is characteristic of the muscles of bodybuilders while myofibrillar hypertrophy is characteristic of weightlifters.[1]

    Strength training typically produces a combination of the two different types of hypertrophy: contraction against 80 to 90% of the one repetition maximum for repetitions (reps) causes myofibrillated hypertrophy to dominate (as in powerlifters, olympic lifters and strength athletes), while several repetitions (generally 12 or more) against a sub-maximal load facilitates mainly sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (professional bodybuilders and endurance athletes).[citation needed] The first measurable effect is an increase in the neural drive stimulating muscle contraction. Within just a few days, an untrained individual can achieve measurable strength gains resulting from "learning" to use the muscle.[citation needed] As the muscle continues to receive increased demands, the synthetic machinery is upregulated. Although all the steps are not yet clear, this upregulation appears to begin with the ubiquitous second messenger system (including phospholipases, protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase, and others).[citation needed] These, in turn, activate the family of immediate-early genes, including c-fos, c-jun and myc. These genes appear to dictate the contractile protein gene response.[citation needed]
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:20 AM GMT
    TexanMan82 said
    ddt8665 said
    PipHop saidSo dumb bells promote more of a thorough workout, but what if you don't want to get bigger, just stronger? My arm size is growing disproportionately to my chest size.


    Higher the rep, lower the weight. barbell or dumbell really dont matter here i think. Someone confirm this please lol


    you have that backwards. Higher weight, lower rep.


    This is for increasing muscle size (of course if u also increase ur protein intake)
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:22 AM GMT
    Higher reps, more volume, more food, to get big.

    Lower reps, less volume, adequate food, for strength.
  • PipHop

    Posts: 439

    Feb 11, 2010 12:25 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidHigher reps, lower weight, through a complete range of motion, with a stretch, is what you want for maximal sarcolasmic hypertrophy (size). For strength, but, not size, you'll want lower reps, fewer sets. Strength does not equal size.

    Several of you have it backwards.

    There are two different types of muscular hypertrophy: sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar. During sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, the volume of sarcoplasmic fluid in the muscle cell increases with no accompanying increase in muscular strength. During myofibrillar hypertrophy, the myofibrils, being the actin and myosin contractile proteins, increase in number and add to muscular strength as well as a small increase in the size of the muscle. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is characteristic of the muscles of bodybuilders while myofibrillar hypertrophy is characteristic of weightlifters.[1]

    Strength training typically produces a combination of the two different types of hypertrophy: contraction against 80 to 90% of the one repetition maximum for repetitions (reps) causes myofibrillated hypertrophy to dominate (as in powerlifters, olympic lifters and strength athletes), while several repetitions (generally 12 or more) against a sub-maximal load facilitates mainly sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (professional bodybuilders and endurance athletes).[citation needed] The first measurable effect is an increase in the neural drive stimulating muscle contraction. Within just a few days, an untrained individual can achieve measurable strength gains resulting from "learning" to use the muscle.[citation needed] As the muscle continues to receive increased demands, the synthetic machinery is upregulated. Although all the steps are not yet clear, this upregulation appears to begin with the ubiquitous second messenger system (including phospholipases, protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase, and others).[citation needed] These, in turn, activate the family of immediate-early genes, including c-fos, c-jun and myc. These genes appear to dictate the contractile protein gene response.[citation needed]


    Chucky I love you like cheese eggs, but you need to break this shit down for us non-mensa membersicon_redface.gif
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:25 AM GMT
    makavelli saidThe barbell makes my arms wobbly for some reason..


    Your nerves haven't adapted, yet. Keep doing it. Your nerves will adapt, your brain will learn better motor control. Keep at it.

    The brain is a computer that processes a wide number of inputs concurrently. As you "learn" to lift the bar, your brain adapts its processing; your nerves get bigger; their firing voltages increase; your receptors work better. It's just like tuning up any machine. You use it; you tune it; it hums along. The machine improves with use.
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:28 AM GMT
    Dear Pip:

    I'm so happy you feel the love.

    Higher reps, more volume, more food, to get big.

    Lower reps, less volume, adequate food, for strength.

    Go for the "pump" if you want to get big.

    Just while away, if you don't.
  • PipHop

    Posts: 439

    Feb 11, 2010 12:48 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidDear Pip:

    I'm so happy you feel the love.

    Higher reps, more volume, more food, to get big.

    Lower reps, less volume, adequate food, for strength.

    Go for the "pump" if you want to get big.

    Just while away, if you don't.


    condecending tone duly notedicon_lol.gif
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:52 AM GMT
    I like to to dumbells on a ball so it helps increase stability as well
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    Feb 11, 2010 12:53 AM GMT
    PipHop said
    chuckystud saidHigher reps, lower weight, through a complete range of motion, with a stretch, is what you want for maximal sarcolasmic hypertrophy (size). For strength, but, not size, you'll want lower reps, fewer sets. Strength does not equal size.

    Several of you have it backwards.

    There are two different types of muscular hypertrophy: sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar. During sarcoplasmic hypertrophy, the volume of sarcoplasmic fluid in the muscle cell increases with no accompanying increase in muscular strength. During myofibrillar hypertrophy, the myofibrils, being the actin and myosin contractile proteins, increase in number and add to muscular strength as well as a small increase in the size of the muscle. Sarcoplasmic hypertrophy is characteristic of the muscles of bodybuilders while myofibrillar hypertrophy is characteristic of weightlifters.[1]

    Strength training typically produces a combination of the two different types of hypertrophy: contraction against 80 to 90% of the one repetition maximum for repetitions (reps) causes myofibrillated hypertrophy to dominate (as in powerlifters, olympic lifters and strength athletes), while several repetitions (generally 12 or more) against a sub-maximal load facilitates mainly sarcoplasmic hypertrophy (professional bodybuilders and endurance athletes).[citation needed] The first measurable effect is an increase in the neural drive stimulating muscle contraction. Within just a few days, an untrained individual can achieve measurable strength gains resulting from "learning" to use the muscle.[citation needed] As the muscle continues to receive increased demands, the synthetic machinery is upregulated. Although all the steps are not yet clear, this upregulation appears to begin with the ubiquitous second messenger system (including phospholipases, protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase, and others).[citation needed] These, in turn, activate the family of immediate-early genes, including c-fos, c-jun and myc. These genes appear to dictate the contractile protein gene response.[citation needed]


    Chucky I love you like cheese eggs, but you need to break this shit down for us non-mensa membersicon_redface.gif


    this information should not have to be spoon fed to you icon_wink.gif
  • PipHop

    Posts: 439

    Feb 11, 2010 12:59 AM GMT
    HAHAHA good one