Kitchenaid

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 15, 2010 7:14 PM GMT
    This doesn't fit in the nutrition section sadly.

    Do I want 5 or 6qt?

    I am leaning for a 5 qt Artisan but I just don't want to regret it.

    You don't understand how dramatic this decision is for a cook.
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    Feb 15, 2010 7:23 PM GMT
    Pinny saidThis doesn't fit in the nutrition section sadly.

    Do I want 5 or 6qt?

    I am leaning for a 5 qt Artisan but I just don't want to regret it.

    You don't understand how dramatic this decision is for a cook.

    The 5-quart Kitchenaid stand mixer typically has a tilt head, while the 6 has a drop-bowl mechanism, with the head remaining stationary. The motor of the 6-quart model also tends to be more powerful by about 100 watts.

    So it's not merely a matter of bowl capacity, but also mixing power and how the beaters are withdrawn from the bowl. I got my partner the stronger fixed-head model, which lets it stay tucked under the kitchen cabinets while in use. If the head tilted up, it would have to be dragged out onto the open counter area for clearance.

    My partner also tended to make mass quantities of everything, so the bigger bowl was just right. For smaller batches I also got him a hand mixer, and he'd sometimes use both at once, the big stand mixer for some tasks, the hand mixer for smaller jobs, like fluffing egg whites or whipping a little heavy cream.
  • darryaz

    Posts: 186

    Feb 15, 2010 7:33 PM GMT
    I've had both actually. Not sure which I liked better.

    I always pulled the 6 quart out to the front of the counter to make it easier to add ingredients to the bowl.

    I don't think you'll go wrong either way.
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    Feb 15, 2010 7:56 PM GMT
    darryaz said

    I don't think you'll go wrong either way.

    O yes I will. I will be raging in my kitchen the day I feel as though I needed the 6 qt. Then again, I will be slightly upset if I never use it.

    The arm on the 6 qt is nice, but I am just trying to be realistic. O hell, everyone move to the same place so I can cook large batches of everything and get use out of my 6 qt.
  • Tiran

    Posts: 227

    Feb 15, 2010 8:04 PM GMT
    I have the six. I say get that one, because you can always mix smaller batches in it, but you can't mix bigger/thicker batches in the five.

    Now I want the sideswipe blade and the pouring sheild.
    41secLpUvZL._SL500_AA280_.jpg
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    Feb 15, 2010 8:20 PM GMT
    the 5 cup is quite capable, I've made numerous large cakes that where 12 inches square in mine in only one batch, I've also made french butter creams to ice them and although it's been close to the top of the bowl it's always been fine. (the cake served like 30 people)

    I've also made massive pavlovas, hundreds of cup cakes, muffins, other cakes, breads, pasta doughs and tons of other things.

    Mine sits in the corner of the bench permanently and I only need to pull it out slightly to use it and tilt the head.

    I've thought about getting the larger model however I get by fine without it and can easily make enough in the mixer for 30 - 60 people if need be (although 60 will probably require double batches but that extra cup for the large wont do it)

    if you make the average size cakes, have a party of less then 20 people and wont use it every single day (or multiple times a week) the 5 cup will suit you well.
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    Feb 15, 2010 8:22 PM GMT
    Pinny saidThis doesn't fit in the nutrition section sadly.

    Do I want 5 or 6qt?

    I am leaning for a 5 qt Artisan but I just don't want to regret it.

    You don't understand how dramatic this decision is for a cook.

    Is there an invitation to dinner following the drama? ... icon_wink.gif
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Feb 15, 2010 9:20 PM GMT
    I prefer 6... it's more akin to what you'll find in the industry.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Feb 15, 2010 9:29 PM GMT
    I've had a 5 for years and I'm happy with it.
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    Feb 15, 2010 9:31 PM GMT
    I've got the 5qt out of necessity...the 6 quart wouldn't fit. It was 1" to tall. Would've loved the 6qt but 5 has been more than sufficient. If you have the room for the 6qt I'd get it. It may be a little easier to clean than the tilt head 5qt.
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    Feb 15, 2010 9:59 PM GMT
    I have high high cabinets so I am not worried about the space. I just don't want to look like I am running a factory out of my kitchen. I bake and cook daily and I am tired of having forearms like Siberian women plus I want my cookies to have a smoother consistency. Some of the fancier shit I make has batter that is just too thick to mix by hand.

  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Feb 15, 2010 10:08 PM GMT
    Pinny saidI have high high cabinets so I am not worried about the space. I just don't want to look like I am running a factory out of my kitchen. I bake and cook daily and I am tired of having forearms like Siberian women plus I want my cookies to have a smoother consistency. Some of the fancier shit I make has batter that is just too thick to mix by hand.



    Just be careful you don't over mix the dough... they'll come out all tough that way. I prefer a nice beater to a kitchen aid when making cookies for that reason. You might not also have enough liquid in your batter.
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:09 PM GMT
    I've been using the five-quart for years and have never yearned for the bigger model, nor have I needed to crank up the motor more than 3/4 of the way...I have it out on a large stainless table, so the lifting head is no problem.

    It can easily whip up a standard (12 C sugar) batch of Wilton buttercream...with room to spare...

    ....now color, that's another decision.....mine's cobalt blue icon_razz.gif
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:11 PM GMT
    Tiran saidI have the six. I say get that one, because you can always mix smaller batches in it, but you can't mix bigger/thicker batches in the five.

    Now I want the sideswipe blade and the pouring sheild.
    41secLpUvZL._SL500_AA280_.jpg



    my problem exactly, have the 5qt, red, its hot and stands out in my kitchen...but when I do big batches, it sucks cause I'll have to make 2
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:12 PM GMT
    Thankfully they come out fine, it is just the nature of the dough/batter. I want the KA because I want even distribution of added items and facilitation of the baking process.

    Just today I have made wasabi mashed potatoes, whole-wheat banana donuts, prepped dinner (turkey burgers), baked chips, and I still have a batch of chocolate chip cookies to do tonight (trying a new chocolate bar).

    Tomorrow I want to make Crack Pie.
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Feb 15, 2010 10:12 PM GMT
    calibro said
    Pinny saidI have high high cabinets so I am not worried about the space. I just don't want to look like I am running a factory out of my kitchen. I bake and cook daily and I am tired of having forearms like Siberian women plus I want my cookies to have a smoother consistency. Some of the fancier shit I make has batter that is just too thick to mix by hand.



    Just be careful you don't over mix the dough... they'll come out all tough that way. I prefer a nice beater to a kitchen aid when making cookies for that reason. You might not also have enough liquid in your batter.


    That's a good point, it mixes a lot quicker. I've learned that with cake batter especially, gets too much air in it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:13 PM GMT
    Pinny saidI have high high cabinets so I am not worried about the space. I just don't want to look like I am running a factory out of my kitchen. I bake and cook daily and I am tired of having forearms like Siberian women plus I want my cookies to have a smoother consistency. Some of the fancier shit I make has batter that is just too thick to mix by hand.

    Just get the 6-quart. You've demonstrated by your angst over it here that only the best will do. Remember, too, that all those great accessories you'll be getting, that plug into the power take-off port up front, will benefit by that extra 100 watts of motor power.

    I wouldn't waste money on some special finish or anniversary model, though. All that really matters is the motor wattage, as a Kitchenaide is owned for decades, when trendy colors are long passè. I remember when Avocado Green and Harvest Gold were all the rage in kitchens.

    Get classic white enamel, which everyone knows makes for more sanitary cleaning afterwards, the only thing a chef should really be concerned about. Even stainless is hard to clean, and I saw a copper Kitchenaide in Williams-Sinoma the other day that I thought would make for hideous upkeep. Is this a fashion statement, or a serious working kitchen tool?
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    MothMan71 said....now color, that's another decision.....mine's cobalt blue icon_razz.gif

    Ever since I was a little girl, I have always wanted the cobalt blue or the grey. Swoon. Be still my heart.
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:22 PM GMT
    Red_Vespa said

    Get classic white enamel, which everyone knows makes for more sanitary cleaning afterwards, the only thing a chef should really be concerned about.


    I only know that NOTHING shows off spilled flour and confectioners sugar like a backdrop of deep, heavenly cobalt blue!

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    Feb 15, 2010 10:23 PM GMT
    The red goes faster icon_razz.gif
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:24 PM GMT
    I am getting ragingly turned out talking about this. Imagine if we started talking about Le Creuset sets.
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:25 PM GMT
    Charcoal grey. Love it.
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    Feb 15, 2010 10:31 PM GMT
    MothMan71 said
    Red_Vespa said

    Get classic white enamel, which everyone knows makes for more sanitary cleaning afterwards, the only thing a chef should really be concerned about.

    I only know that NOTHING shows off spilled flour and confectioners sugar like a backdrop of deep, heavenly cobalt blue!

    Perhaps, but white will more consistently show off every other kind of splashed food, along with dirty fingerprints and other contaminants.

    Not that I don't adore cobalt blue, especially in glass. Indeed, when I came out gay late in life, one of my most astonishing discoveries was that the passion I'd had for cobalt blue since a child, is shared by so many other gay men. With ruby red being a close second.

    But passions aside, practicality for a chef should rule here. And I will still argue for snow white as the better sanitary color under more home kitchen circumstances than the darker cobalt blue.
  • darryaz

    Posts: 186

    Feb 15, 2010 10:33 PM GMT
    Pinny saidI am getting ragingly turned out talking about this. Imagine if we started talking about Le Creuset sets.


    Not sure my heart could take that.
  • WILDCARD73

    Posts: 545

    Feb 15, 2010 10:38 PM GMT
    size always matter

    get the 6 qrt

    as long as you do lots of cooking and baking, and in larg quantities

    i use mine all the time, i bake alot and i do large batches
    the 5 qt that i got get messy as it doesnt hold much