Need an Alternative for my Obliques

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    Mar 04, 2010 10:06 AM GMT
    So I normally do the oblique exercise where you're standing on an incline with our hip resting on a pad and then you bend at your hip up away from the incline while holding a weight (sorry, I never learned the name of this).

    I usually do 4 sets of 25 holding a 25 lb weight and have no problems with it, but get a good workout still.

    However, I recently tweaked my lower back. It's nothing major and for almost every other motion I do in everyday life and my workout, it's not a factor. On this one exercise though, the pain is pretty intense on the one side, so I've stopped doing it for the past week. I wanna give it a couple more weeks to heal up before trying again, though.

    So I was wondering what suggestions you guys might have for an alternative exercise for the obliques that won't engage the lower back as well. I know I could do oblique planks but those are just...so...boring. Any ideasicon_question.gif
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    Mar 04, 2010 5:34 PM GMT
    Give it a rest for a while.
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    Mar 04, 2010 6:22 PM GMT
    FYI side bends do not work the obliques because the obliques are not responsible for lateral flexion of the spine. Obliques are responsible for rotation. Side bends work the quadratus lumborum muscle that attaches to the ribs and pelvis. Doing side bends with weights can actually build up this muscle, increasing waist size.

    Rest your back.
    You can then try something like bicycle crunches or oblique crunches on a stability or bosu ball.
    Hope this helps
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    Mar 04, 2010 6:40 PM GMT
    If you can't do it laying on your back, can you twist your obliques from a hanging position instead?
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvZ_1uoFT6k
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    Mar 04, 2010 6:44 PM GMT
    anatomy2.jpg

    Courtesy of ericsgym.com.
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    Mar 04, 2010 6:45 PM GMT
    1) Mike is right, drop the side bends.

    2) Let your back heal. Relax. Don't rush it.

    3) When you get back on the horse, look on RJ for "core strength" exercises, and make at least one day in your workout split devoted to it -- you want to prevent future back tweaks, this is the way to do it. Core strength involves the obliques, but much more.

    4) As for the obliques themselves, you reject side planks as "boring" but they really work the obliques, unlike the exercise you seemed to be doing. I'm concerned that you're micro-focusing on one particular muscle involved in core strength, especially since you were doing a movement that wasn't targeting the muscle you were focused on anyway, while rejecting the movement that actually did what you wanted as "too boring." Maybe drop the word "obliques" from your vocabulary and replace it with "core strength" and spend a little reading time on that while you're resting your back.

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    Mar 04, 2010 6:50 PM GMT
    http://www.innerbody.com/image/musfov.html
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    Mar 04, 2010 10:56 PM GMT
    iguanaSF said1) Mike is right, drop the side bends.

    2) Let your back heal. Relax. Don't rush it.

    3) When you get back on the horse, look on RJ for "core strength" exercises, and make at least one day in your workout split devoted to it -- you want to prevent future back tweaks, this is the way to do it. Core strength involves the obliques, but much more.

    4) As for the obliques themselves, you reject side planks as "boring" but they really work the obliques, unlike the exercise you seemed to be doing. I'm concerned that you're micro-focusing on one particular muscle involved in core strength, especially since you were doing a movement that wasn't targeting the muscle you were focused on anyway, while rejecting the movement that actually did what you wanted as "too boring." Maybe drop the word "obliques" from your vocabulary and replace it with "core strength" and spend a little reading time on that while you're resting your back.



    To be honest, yeah it seems I was a bit misguided on the coice of exercise for obliques. I chose them cuz I actually like that I feel something's happening with them. But as you guys pointed out, it's not obliques so yeah my mistake.

    As for the planks, I actually do planks. I try to rotate my ab routine and planks was actually in my last set, so I was doing oblique planks for a few months. I don't dismiss them, was just hoping for something with a little more activity and that gives you more burn. For me, I never really feltmuch with them.

    For reference, the way I tweaked my back was actually from just trying to correct my posture at work. I realized 90% of the time, my posture is abysmal. So I tried to exercise better posture at least at work. After a few weeks though, my lower back started complaining.
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    Mar 04, 2010 11:02 PM GMT
    Oh and bicycle crunches actually are in my ab routine right now. I do them every day I work out..
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    Mar 05, 2010 12:03 AM GMT
    Ok, sorry if this sounds like I'm being contrary, but I'm just confused now. This is the exercise that I do:

    http://www.exrx.net/WeightExercises/Obliques/WT45SideBend.html

    According to that site (which I thought was reputable), this is an oblique exercise.

    Maybe I just didn't describe it well in the original post? Or maybe that site is wrong?
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    Mar 05, 2010 4:36 AM GMT
    The obliques might be activated in a stabilizing role, but when you bend to your side, they are not involved. However, if you twist as you are coming up, then the obliques will get activated. Do the same exercise, but rotate your bottom elbow toward the ceiling as you come up (am I describing that clearly?). You should not need to add any additional weight.
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    Mar 05, 2010 4:53 AM GMT
    Alright, I can give that a try once I'm healed up.