More dangerous stupidity

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 05, 2010 1:05 PM GMT
    More stupidity. Thanks conservatives, especially the christian evangenlical republican variety.


    http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/science/earth/04climate.html

    Critics of the teaching of evolution in the nation’s classrooms are gaining ground in some states by linking the issue to global warming, arguing that dissenting views on both scientific subjects should be taught in public schools.

    In Kentucky, a bill recently introduced in the Legislature would encourage teachers to discuss “the advantages and disadvantages of scientific theories,” including “evolution, the origins of life, global warming and human cloning.”

    The bill, which has yet to be voted on, is patterned on even more aggressive efforts in other states to fuse such issues. In Louisiana, a law passed in 2008 says the state board of education may assist teachers in promoting “critical thinking” on all of those subjects.

    Last year, the Texas Board of Education adopted language requiring that teachers present all sides of the evidence on evolution and global warming.

    Oklahoma introduced a bill with similar goals in 2009, although it was not enacted.

    The linkage of evolution and global warming is partly a legal strategy: courts have found that singling out evolution for criticism in public schools is a violation of the separation of church and state. By insisting that global warming also be debated, deniers of evolution can argue that they are simply championing academic freedom in general.

    Yet they are also capitalizing on rising public resistance in some quarters to accepting the science of global warming, particularly among political conservatives who oppose efforts to rein in emissions of greenhouse gases.

    In South Dakota, a resolution calling for the “balanced teaching of global warming in public schools” passed the Legislature this week.

    “Carbon dioxide is not a pollutant,” the resolution said, “but rather a highly beneficial ingredient for all plant life.”

    The measure made no mention of evolution, but opponents of efforts to dilute the teaching of evolution noted that the language was similar to that of bills in other states that had included both. The vote split almost entirely along partisan lines in both houses, with Republican voting for it and Democrats voting against.

    For mainstream scientists, there is no credible challenge to evolutionary theory. They oppose the teaching of alternative views like intelligent design, the proposition that life is so complex that it must be the design of an intelligent being. And there is wide agreement among scientists that global warming is occurring and that human activities are probably driving it. Yet many conservative evangelical Christians assert that both are examples of scientists’ overstepping their bounds.

    John G. West, a senior fellow with the Discovery Institute in Seattle, a group that advocates intelligent design and has led the campaign for teaching critiques of evolution in the schools, said that the institute was not specifically promoting opposition to accepted science on climate change. Still, Mr. West said, he is sympathetic to that cause.

    “There is a lot of similar dogmatism on this issue,” he said, “with scientists being persecuted for findings that are not in keeping with the orthodoxy. We think analyzing and evaluating scientific evidence is a good thing, whether that is about global warming or evolution.”

    Lawrence M. Krauss, a physicist who directs the Origins Initiative at Arizona State University and has spoken against efforts to water down the teaching of evolution to school boards in Texas and Ohio, described the move toward climate-change skepticism as a predictable offshoot of creationism.

    “Wherever there is a battle over evolution now,” he said, “there is a secondary battle to diminish other hot-button issues like Big Bang and, increasingly, climate change. It is all about casting doubt on the veracity of science — to say it is just one view of the world, just another story, no better or more valid than fundamentalism.”

    Not all evangelical Christians reject the notion of climate change, of course. There is a budding green evangelical movement in the country driven partly by a belief that because God created the earth, humans are obligated to care for it.

    Yet there is little doubt that the skepticism about global warming resonates more strongly among conservatives, and Christian conservatives in particular. A survey published in October by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press found that white evangelical Protestants were among those least likely to believe that there was “solid evidence” that the Earth was warming because of human activity.

    Only 23 percent of those surveyed accepted that idea, compared with 36 percent of the American population as a whole.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 05, 2010 2:34 PM GMT
    Well what do you expect?

    There is such a virulent and deep strain of anti-intellectualism that it is a miracle many people even know how to read. I work in a bookstore and have had kids come up to me and ask for the Sparknotes (a version of Cliff Notes) for Animal Farm and Lord of the Flies.

    I have had parents demand the audio version of Tom Sawyer and Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry because their kids don't like to read. I constantly hear the moan of "I hate reading." The Science section in our store is a third of the size of our Christianity section.

    When states suffer budget shortfalls through their own stupidity, what is the first thing that is cut? Education. It just seems that many people have no curiosity whatsoever. Just give us an easy answer that God created everything, climate change is not happening, and somehow the US will always still be a technological leader.

    Sorry for the rambling rant but people trying to annex education to their church is an abomination to me. Also Georgia seems determined to slash funding for education into nonexistence. That has me upset too. It's a miracle the Baptists haven't prayed our education system out of existence.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 05, 2010 4:31 PM GMT
    These false belief systems are very dangerous. What is amazing to me is that in 2010 so many idiots still sign on even though there's a compelling body of evidence against them. It's proof positive that man has a long way to go.
  • GQjock

    Posts: 11649

    Mar 05, 2010 8:33 PM GMT
    {sigh} icon_confused.gif


    I read things like this and it is NO wonder in such a short period of time we have gone from the Greatest Generation a population who doesn't know

    That The Friggin Name That they Made for themselves Means Having someones Balls being put on your Forehead!!!!!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 05, 2010 8:42 PM GMT
    chuckystud saidThese false belief systems are very dangerous. What is amazing to me is that in 2010 so many idiots still sign on even though there's a compelling body of evidence against them. It's proof positive that man has a long way to go.


    agreed, dangerous and delusional.
    What is equally dangerous is that Christians don't even know their own religion and are willing to blindly follow whoever touts the conservative political and religious mantras.
    If Christians read their bibles they might find that God instructs them to take care of the earth rather than destroy it... and perhaps they'd figure out that, even given the inspiration of the bible, genesis wasn't written as a historical depiction of how the world was created.

    Christians are not only delusional, but they poorly understand their own faith.
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    Mar 05, 2010 8:56 PM GMT
    As I've written here before, I lived for 11 years in North Dakota (in 2 "installments"). Lovely people, horrible weather, bleak terrain, especially in the eastern half. Their entire state population of about 650k is less than a New York City borough, spread over nearly 71,000 square miles, the 19th largest state in the Union. Some counties are designated Frontier by the US Census Bureau, because less than 2 people per square mile live in them.

    And I saw these 1900s-era brick schoolhouses, still standing, some now converted into private homes, apartments and businesses, that were built over 100 years ago. When their cost was astronomical to communities that had sparse populations and little income. But their children were the first priority, and would be well-educated, no matter what.

    Those pioneer farmers, barely scraping by, somehow dug into their pockets and put up buildings that were the best in town, better than City Hall, hired teachers from "back East" and paid for their train fares, and got their kids educated. Where is that spirit today?

    The current Republican focus is not eduction, but political & Christian indoctrination. It is the same disease that undermined the Soviet Union, minus the religious component. You cannot advance when you refuse to teach advancement. You cannot grow when you refuse to teach growth. You cannot teach science when you refuse to acknowledge the truth of science, constrained by either political or religious doctrines.

    Science is truth, and truth is science. You will find neither in politics nor in religion.
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    Mar 05, 2010 9:20 PM GMT
    SCOTUS has already determined that "creation science" is religion and violated the establishment clause of the First Amendment.


    Kansan pastor Ray Mummert, on Kitzmiller v. Dover Area School Board, 2005 ...

    "We've been attacked by the intelligent, educated segment of our culture."

    --Idiot America
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    Mar 09, 2010 6:25 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa saidAs I've written here before, I lived for 11 years in North Dakota (in 2 "installments"). Lovely people, horrible weather, bleak terrain, especially in the eastern half. Their entire state population of about 650k is less than a New York City borough, spread over nearly 71,000 square miles, the 19th largest state in the Union. Some counties are designated Frontier by the US Census Bureau, because less than 2 people per square mile live in them.

    snip

    Science is truth, and truth is science. You will find neither in politics nor in religion.

    I'm living there now. I teach science...and I'm a Christian. The trouble is that certain loudmouths generate the headlines. In truth, most Christian denominations accept evolution. They do not accept that man developed by chance, but if one believes in a God, one isn't likely to accept this.

    Sure I cover evolution in my class. I also cover areas where there are still questions about it. I also cover global warming...and some of the realities about what is out there about it right now.

    I tend to find that there is a lot of extremism among those who claim to be scientific, and the extremism is just as bad as what I hear from religious extremists. I've read attacks on those who note faults in global warming. Sorry, but there are faults. Taking care of God's creation does not necessarily mean that we must follow the global warming agenda.

    Science is exciting because it is based on evidence. It often requires a change in generation for new ideas to be accepted. What frightens me about the global warming movement is its politicization. It's a power grab. That is entirely separate from science. Science is based on evidence and what frightens me is the way both sides seem to resist and even condemn evidence that is contradictory to their world views.

    Getting back to North Dakota: I've taught in several parts of the country. What has amazed me is the startling level of education and awareness that exists in this state, even in the rural areas (where I teach). I've taught in a university town in another state as well as a few other towns, and none approach the intellectual environment I've seen in the small towns of North Dakota. The people of North Dakota really do value education and the description I quoted at the beginning is right on. Education is important, and politics must be kept out of it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 6:30 AM GMT
    Well according to evolutionary theory homosexuality doesn't even exist.

    Why not just remove it entirely from the curriculum ?
    It wouldn't make the slightest bit of difference to anyone.

    How much do you ever hear of it anyway ?
    A paragraph or two in year 11 and 12 Biology.