Virginia Attorney General advises universities to "drop LGBT protections".

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 06, 2010 10:23 AM GMT
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/05/AR2010030501582.html?hpid=moreheadlines&sid=ST2010030502143


    icon_evil.gificon_evil.gif

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    Mar 06, 2010 1:26 PM GMT
    north_runner saidhttp://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/03/05/AR2010030501582.html?hpid=moreheadlines&sid=ST2010030502143


    icon_evil.gificon_evil.gif

    Hey, just another Republican doing what their party says they must do: oppose gays and gay rights at every opportunity. And yet there are allegedly gay men here who applaud the Republicans, vote for them, even call themselves Republicans. And this is what they stand for... icon_sad.gif

    Oh, and BTW, please don't anyone drag out those tired and discredited arguments that "not all Republicans think this way" and "you're generalizing" and "I don't personally support this." The point is that ENOUGH Republicans think exactly this way, and do support it, to represent a serious & organized threat to all gays, whether all gays realize it or not. Support a Republican in any form, and you support things like this, there's no getting around it.

    Wherever Republicans gain power in the US we see this kind of thing over and over again, so save your platitudes and philosophizing for the classroom, and wake up and smell the coffee.

    BTW, thanks for the article link, I hadn't seen this yet.
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:03 PM GMT
    Well, I had applied for a job at Va Tech and another at the College of William and Mary.... guess I'd better withdraw those applications. I mean, I know they will never actually go through with that, but who wants to be in a place where it could happen?
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:05 PM GMT
    I started a similiar thread yesterday
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:13 PM GMT
    WOW. As usual, it's one baby step forward for Virginia (with Obama's election) and many many leaps backwards. What a backwards-ass state. I hope the state's stellar university system is wise enough not to adopt this insanity. It's times like these that I'm ashamed to call myself a Virginia resident. Sad sad sad sad.
  • coolarmydude

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    Mar 06, 2010 3:15 PM GMT
    George Wallace reincarnated & repackaged!!
  • CuriousJockAZ

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    Mar 06, 2010 3:17 PM GMT
    Perhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:18 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    True.... be part of the solution or be part of the problem by running away and doing nothing....
  • coolarmydude

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    Mar 06, 2010 3:19 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    That is actually a good point.

    I kind of feel the same way about Palin for President and the Tea baggers. Let them move us backwards enough to prompt the country to dump on them and propel us forward from this muck.

    It's like the lethality of an arrow when used in a bow. The arrow has to be pulled back in order to become a potent force moving forward.
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:22 PM GMT
    coolarmydude said
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    That is actually a good point.

    I kind of feel the same way about Palin for President and the Tea baggers. Let them move us backwards enough to prompt the country to dump on them and propel us forward from this muck.

    It's like the lethality of an arrow when used in a bow. The arrow has to be pulled back in order to become a potent force moving forward.


    while I agree with the sentiment, I can't help but think that you're trying to start yet another fight...

    Even so, yes I sometimes think that doing nothing about ignorance like this is on par with consenting to allow it.
  • coolarmydude

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    Mar 06, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    No. I'm just expressing my sentiments of these last few weeks. I carry no agenda.
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    coolarmydude saidNo. I'm just expressing my sentiments of these last few weeks. I carry no agenda.


    Understood.... sorry to be pugnacious.
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    Mar 06, 2010 3:28 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.

    Exactly.

    I am actually somewhat happy that this nutcase is doing this. Few people, even anti-gay marriage people, approve of job discriminaton. This will garner some sympathy for gay rights. It will also show the tenuous situation that the Dems have left gays in in this state, because they havent followed thru and changed the laws. Now gays can point to the necessity that Dems act on and not just talk gay rights.

    From an article in the Washington Post:

    "Official representatives of several universities, including the University of Virginia, Virginia Tech, the College of William and Mary and George Mason University, reacted cautiously to the letter, declining to comment and indicating that their governing boards would examine the issue.

    But some individual college board members and others said Cuccinelli's action would be highly controversial on campuses, where many argue that such policies are necessary to attract top students and faculty.

    "What he's saying is reprehensible," said Vincent F. Callahan Jr., a former Republican member of the House of Delegates who serves on George Mason's board of visitors. "I don't know what he's doing, opening up this can of worms."

    It is not entirely clear what recourse Cuccinelli would have if the universities do not follow his advice. Claire Guthrie GastaƱaga, general counsel to the gay rights group Equality Virginia and a former deputy attorney general, urged boards to seek a second opinion. "They call it advice for a reason," she said."

  • coolarmydude

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    Mar 06, 2010 3:33 PM GMT
    canworms.jpg


    For every opened can of worms, there is a Pandora.
  • roadbikeRob

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    Mar 06, 2010 10:19 PM GMT
    This is horribly, sad news for Virginia. I was hoping that the Old Dominion State was finally making long overdue advances on social issues but then it gets sidetracked by some brainless, ultra conservative lunatic. The Attorney General should be ashamed of himself for even thinking of such a horrendous and inhumane idea like removing protections for GLBT workers in the state's universities. This stinks.
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    Mar 07, 2010 8:00 AM GMT
    TheIStrat saidI started a similiar thread yesterday


    Sorry lol. I didn't see it.

    CuriousJockAZPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    I agree. What's disappointing is the recent rollback by the VA governor of state protections, and then this. Apparently the VA General Assembly is not very gay friendly.

    Interestingly enough, this is precisely what my local GSA has been petitioning the University of Alaska to include in their non-discrimination statements.

    Doing a state by state research, I found that EVERY statewide university system has this in their non-discimination statements. I printed them all out, alphabetized them and literally got to throw the book at our Board of Regents: the University of Alaska is, as far as I can tell, the only state university to not have sexual orientation (let alone gender identity) in its non-discrimination statements.
  • GQjock

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    Mar 07, 2010 2:28 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    But the problem is that there IS no outrage
    Because we are a minority
    and that journalistic media is too busy picking their own asses going after stories about Octomom and whatever the hell Sara Palin is doing
    I gave up a long time ago on America's moral outrage
    We had 8 freakin' years of George W Bush
    If there was no outrage there .... I'm afraid as far as the American Public coming to OUR aid? Don't hold your breath
  • rdberg1957

    Posts: 662

    Mar 07, 2010 3:17 PM GMT
    I used to have some trust in the American people--that they would eventually come around, especially on noxious proposals. But I have come to realize that at least in this generation, people are too willing to give up civil liberties for any purported threat to security, too willing to throw others under the bus to protect themselves, and too willfully ignorant to know when they are being snowed by Republicans.

    While Obama and the Democrats have made many missteps and sometimes been tone deaf, they have not been ludicrously so as compared to Republicans in the previous eight years. The American people tolerated lie after lie, all kinds of corruption under Bush, yet they believe the Republican attack machine after 1 year of Obama. What has been so frustrating to me about Democrats is how unprincipled they are, how unwilling to stand for what they say they believe in. We are not well served in the US by our current politics. Perhaps it is I who have changed because I have seen how ridiculously slow positive change is in coming, how we sometimes go backwards.

    Despite what I've said above, I am amazed at how far gay rights have come in my lifetime. I came out in an era when the thought of gay marriage was not even considered among the few gay activists who were advocating for gay rights. We are on the cusp of change in the military, a harbinger of good things to come if historical trends hold sway. When Truman desegregated the military, that set off a chain reaction which led to Brown v. Board of Education and all the civil rights change that came thereafter.

    However, I am Jewish and gay, therefore highly suspicious of the general public of any nation based on historical example; when Hitler took power, there was a sea change from national gay rights laws to criminalization of gay identity. I love to be proven wrong, that my suspicious nature is unwarranted. Sometimes I am, but lately I have not trusted the American people to rise up when provoked, when the rights of others are threatened. In this matter, I think passive resistance may be the tactic that pro-gay forces will use when faced with noxious recommendations from official power.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Mar 07, 2010 3:23 PM GMT
    GQjock said
    CuriousJockAZ saidPerhaps it's good that stuff like this happens so that it brings the backwardness of some of the thinking out into the open so that "The Public" can show their outrage towards it and, hopefully, bury it.


    But the problem is that there IS no outrage
    Because we are a minority
    and that journalistic media is too busy picking their own asses going after stories about Octomom and whatever the hell Sara Palin is doing
    I gave up a long time ago on America's moral outrage
    We had 8 freakin' years of George W Bush
    If there was no outrage there .... I'm afraid as far as the American Public coming to OUR aid? Don't hold your breath




    I didn't necessarily mean "outrage" in terms of marching in the streets and picketing politicians offices, but rather outrage in terms of who people vote for at the polls.
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Mar 07, 2010 3:32 PM GMT
    The power is with youth, frankly. And I find most young men and women of this generation evolved, socially and morally sound thinkers, and fair and good people. That's both straight identified as well as gay youth. I believe in them. And I believe that they can - and hopefully will -- make it clear by adopting the simple stance re VA schools
    "DON'T APPLY, AND DON'T ACCEPT - SAY NO TO VIRGINIA'S POLICY OF HATE AND DISCRIMINATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION"

    Easy to do: Applications are free from all the schools on line. Get one. Give it to a college bound grad you may know and have them write on it and mail it back. Better yet, get two, mail one to the school, one to the Attorney General and send the message loud and clear.

    Parents of students, and advisors and high school counselors and mentors can do the same. We will not send our youth to you, we will not spend money where this kind of hate is even remotely possible.

    Virginia deserves better. Jefferson is rolling over in his tomb.

  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19129

    Mar 07, 2010 3:34 PM GMT
    coolarmydude said

    I kind of feel the same way about Palin for President and the Tea baggers. Let them move us backwards enough to prompt the country to dump on them and propel us forward from this muck.

    It's like the lethality of an arrow when used in a bow. The arrow has to be pulled back in order to become a potent force moving forward.



    I agree with you in theory, however this sentiment could work both ways and backfire on Obama. Those that lifted him up to be the next Messiah, then got a taste of his governing and are now saying "Whoa, this isn't what I signed up for". This is not an anti Obama statement in any way (Personally, I happen to think he's doing okay) but I do know many who were singing his praises in 2008 who in 2010 are quite disappointed. Be careful what you wish for.
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    Mar 07, 2010 3:57 PM GMT
    southbeach1500 said
    coolarmydude saidI kind of feel the same way about Palin for President and the Tea baggers. Let them move us backwards enough to prompt the country to dump on them and propel us forward from this muck.

    In the 2008 elections, that's precisely why I supported Democrats.

    I had a hunch that there was a good chance that the Democrats would increase their majority in the House + Senate. Plus with the charismatic Barack Obama.... a perfect alignment of ultra liberals (Obama, Pelosi, Reid) and presto! The public would finally see what Democrats are all about: Massive government spending and borrowing, expanded government control over citizens, dozens of kommisars/czars... all modelled on the old Soviet system of a powerful central government.

    And the Amerian people are rejecting it.


    Feels sort of like you are playing both sides against the middle so you can always claim to be on the "winning side"...do we really need to do that?....While I openly admit that I voted for Obama, and I STILL SUPPORT HIM...I can't say the same for Congress.....after a year of a "bullet proof" democratic majority and getting nearly nothing accomplished, the Democrats have earned the contempt and backlash of the electorate.....but the unfortunate "answer" to this contempt and backlash is assumed to be the republicans. The choice of 2 bad options is still not the answer.....nor is it the extremes of the splinter groups like the "t-baggers"..... unfortunately I don't have an answer, because no one is willing to speak the truth, and even fewer are willing to vote for the unpopular truth.....icon_sad.gif
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    Mar 07, 2010 5:02 PM GMT
    rdberg1957 saidI used to have some trust in the American people--that they would eventually come around, especially on noxious proposals. But I have come to realize that at least in this generation, people are too willing to give up civil liberties for any purported threat to security, too willing to throw others under the bus to protect themselves, and too willfully ignorant to know when they are being snowed by Republicans.

    This is the classic Republican tactic: propose a fear for which they have a solution. They did it with Communism throughout the 1950s & 60s, and they did it again with us gays in the 2004 election. Scare tactics are what empower the Republican Party, and it hasn't failed them yet. They consistently encourage a paranoid view of the world, and it works very well at the polls.

    The Roman Catholic Church did the same thing for a thousand years, during the Middle Ages, and it's a formula that's hard to beat. Immediate fear is always a better motivator than future good, and this is why it wins.

    I see no good results here. Republicans will win, gays will lose. There may be a hope that cultural changes will erode the Republican base for gay hatred, but too slowly for me to see its benefit during my lifetime. So I and my partner will continue to lurk in the legal shadows, trying to protect ourselves as best we can, trying to lay the groundwork for gay rights that will come after us. Hoping that some of you guys here will see a gay-friendly world that we never will.
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    Mar 07, 2010 5:20 PM GMT
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    Hey, just another gay doing what their community says they must do: tolerate all perversions that have a same-sex component and thwart gay rights at every opportunity. And yet there are allegedly gay men here who applaud the fringe sexual deviants, tolerate them, even call themselves gay. And this is what they stand for... icon_sad.gif

    Oh, and BTW, please don't anyone drag out those tired and discredited arguments that "not all gays are this way" and "you're generalizing" and "I don't personally support this." The point is that ENOUGH gays think exactly this way, and do support it, to represent a serious & organized threat to all same-sex attracted men, whether all gays realize it or not. Support/Tolerate a sexual deviant in any form as part of your ranks, and you support things like this, there's no getting around it.

    Wherever gays gain power in the US we see this kind of thing over and over again. In fact we've seen the same type of in-your-face, screw anyone, anytime, anywhere civil rights battle for the past 30 years, still to only little avail. It's time to wake up and smell the coffee about just why it has taken so long.


    (Template courtesy of Red Vespa. Just edited the meaning due to it's obvious interchangeability.)



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    Mar 07, 2010 5:31 PM GMT
    I live in Virginia and of course being a gay man I am not happy about this. As I understand it, the attorney general, Ken Cuccenili proposed this to the colleges/universities but they do not have to follow it. This is very backwards and stupid of course and even though there are a lot of republicans out there that voted for him, there are a lot that support gay rights and will not be happy with his choice. It will shed light on ignorance and make people more aware of the struggle the gay/lesbian community is facing and more and more people will realize, "Wow, that's just plan wrong." They will speak out, talk to people , and reasonable, level headed American's will get a better understanding of the struggle gay's (we) face. So if you ask me, there is a lot of good that will come out of this, just wait and see my friends....