What should I do for my chest and getting back in shape?

  • Geoedward

    Posts: 657

    Mar 09, 2010 2:16 AM GMT
    Hi, I am 52, 5'11 and 175lbs. I have always had trouble building up my chest. I lost a lot of weight so right now I look pretty thin everywhere. I want to build up my whole body at the same time. Right now my ribs protrude a lot more then my chest. I have a big rib cage. I would just like to look good all the way around. I want to be fit and healthy as I get older. I just know that when I have worked out in the past my chest doesn't grow much. Also if I lift weights 3 days a week is it better to do different areas of the body each workout or should I continue to do a couple exercises for each part of my body each night? I do cardio two to three times a week. My waist is 33", my biceps are 13", my chest is 42" My rib cage is the same. I used to have a great bubble but, but my partner says I have no ass anymore. I eat 6 to 7 small meals a day. For breakfast I have a whey protein shake with a table spoon of peanut butter, about 2 cups of fresh blueberries, a banana, and about a cup of 1% milk. I have kashi snack bar for mid morning snack, or a hand full of heart healthy nuts. For lunch I have a roast beef or turkey sandwich on whole grain bread, and a fat free yogurt or a large salad with fat free ham, a boiled egg, low fat cheese and a red pepper. I use a vinaigrette dressing. I have a snack a little later of an apple, or an orange, about an hour before I go workout I have an apple with about a tablespoon of peanut butter or a kashi bar. After I work out, I have another protein shake like the one in the morning. About an hour or so later I have dinner. Dinner is usually Chicken or steak, a vegetable and brown rice. Lastly, I sometimes have a cup of yogurt fat free ice cream blend. I know this is long but I wanted to try to give you all the information I could to help you all help me. This is very important to me so Thank you very much to all that respond.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 6:46 PM GMT
    You are not eating enough. You need more carbs in your diet, and more protein that is not a shake. They are supplements, not replacements. Breakfast: oatmeal, the protein shake and the berries. This will really set you up for the day. If you like you can make the oatmeal with milk. How much you have is up to you. I have a cup of oatmeal, 2 cups of water, some sunflower seeds and microwave for 4 mins. It takes time to eat, but you should really try to do it.
    Shift some of your fruit consumption to immediately after you train. This is the best time to eat it. Not putting on weight is not SIMPLY about consuming fewer calories. WHAT the calories are and WHEN you eat them matter a lot. The idea is to burn off more than you consume, so you need to take the "burn off" side seriously too, which means keeping your metabolism going.

    You need to focus your lifting. Lift 3 times a week for no more than an hour, but work solidly for an hour and work with integrity. Work upper and lower body in each workout. Do the core lifts, don´t get fancy. You can either do the same routine each time or have two that you alternate ABA then next week BAB. If you have no physical problems then squats, deads and bench press should happen. Start LIGHT (just the bar). Find someone who will teach you how to do this correctly (ie older trainer who has been around for a while). Have maybe 3 sessions in a row, then a bit of time on your own and then another check up session. But get someone good, not just a cute kid who will stand there.

    The other 2/3 days you can either do (1) yoga, (2) HIIT and stretching or (3) hiking/walking and stretching, depending on how tired you are and what you like. HIIT is another way of talking about interval training. Have at least one day a week with no exercise more than a short walk. If you are getting tired then have 2 rest days. Stretching is as important as lifting, especially as you age.

    Have realistic expectations, make sure you work hard and rest enough. You won´t recover as fast as a 22 year old. Remember that commitment over time is what matters, not going hard for a month.
  • lozano86

    Posts: 293

    Mar 09, 2010 6:51 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidYou are not eating enough. You need more carbs in your diet, and more protein that is not a shake. They are supplements, not replacements. Breakfast: oatmeal, the protein shake and the berries. This will really set you up for the day. If you like you can make the oatmeal with milk. How much you have is up to you. I have a cup of oatmeal, 2 cups of water, some sunflower seeds and microwave for 4 mins. It takes time to eat, but you should really try to do it.
    Shift some of your fruit consumption to immediately after you train. This is the best time to eat it.

    You need to focus your lifting. Lift 3 times a week for no more than an hour, but work solidly for an hour and work with integrity. Work upper and lower body in each workout. Do the core lifts, don´t get fancy. You can either do the same routine each time or have two that you alternate ABA then next week BAB. If you have no physical problems then squats, deads and bench press should happen. Start LIGHT (just the bar). Find someone who will teach you how to do this correctly (ie older trainer who has been around for a while). Have maybe 3 sessions in a row, then a bit of time on your own and then another check up session. But get someone good, not just a cute kid who will stand there.


    The other 3 days you can either do (1) yoga, (2) HIIT and stretching or (3) hiking/walking and stretching, depending on how tired you are and what you like. HIIT is another way of talking about interval training. Have at least one day a week with no exercise more than a short walk. If you are getting tired then have 2 rest days. Stretching is as important as lifting, especially as you age.

    Have realistic expectations, make sure you work hard and rest enough. You won´t recover as fast as a 22 year old. Remember that commitment over time is what matters, not going hard for a month.


    That is some good advice. But oatmeal really? Its soggy and tasted weird.
    Ill try it though. Im unhappy with my chest as well
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 6:55 PM GMT
    hahahaha... I have to admit I have a love/hate relationship with oatmeal. But I´m addicted now. It´s good for the following reasons:
    (1) keeps you regular
    (2) lowers cholesterol
    (3) slow release energy.

    The way to make it less soggy is add a tablespoon of sunflower seeds and a tablespoon of quinoa. This makes it crunchy and it becomes really quite acceptable.


    Ohhh the other thing I was going to say about chests is that you have to be careful to really work the pecs and not lift so heavy that you move the work too much into the shoulders. For me this meant (1) learning to close the front of the body as you lift (cable cross is a nice way of finding it) and (2) lifting lighter than I thought i could so that it was my pecs, not my arms.
  • CuriousJockAZ

    Posts: 19133

    Mar 09, 2010 7:17 PM GMT
    Lostboy saidhahahaha... I have to admit I have a love/hate relationship with oatmeal



    I can so relate to this. I know it's good for you, and I try to eat it at least 4 or 5 mornings a week, but no matter how I dress it up I have to really work at eating it all...I think it may be the texture I'm not keen on.

    The other complaint I have about oatmeal is that I seem to be hungry again in a few hours, to where if I have a more rounded breakfast like eggs and toast and some meat protein, I'm not hungry again as soon.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 7:51 PM GMT
    CuriousJockAZ said
    Lostboy saidhahahaha... I have to admit I have a love/hate relationship with oatmeal



    I can so relate to this. I know it's good for you, and I try to eat it at least 4 or 5 mornings a week, but no matter how I dress it up I have to really work at eating it all...I think it may be the texture I'm not keen on.

    The other complaint I have about oatmeal is that I seem to be hungry again in a few hours, to where if I have a more rounded breakfast like eggs and toast and some meat protein, I'm not hungry again as soon.


    Two tips

    Use jumbo oats and mix in some sunflower seeds and quinoa. It really makes a difference.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 7:56 PM GMT
    dump your protein powder in your oatmeal to boost your protein output
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 09, 2010 8:02 PM GMT
    Rujock saiddump your protein powder in your oatmeal to boost your protein output


    The only problem with this is that sometimes you want to bail out on the oatmeal but don´t want to lose the protein haha...I always keep them separate.
  • Geoedward

    Posts: 657

    Mar 12, 2010 7:45 PM GMT
    Hey guys, Thanks!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 14, 2010 11:43 PM GMT
    I started eating oatmeal daily because of a dietary restriction, and I've continued for over a year! My favourite is to sprinkle some crunchy granola over it and add some fruit and yoghurt. Those days when I run out of the dressings and have to eat it plain are the worst!
  • gumbi69

    Posts: 20

    Mar 15, 2010 1:48 AM GMT
    i love oatmeal.
    sorry i must be the odd man out
    never tried it with yogurt but sounds good
    whatever eat it anyways its that good
  • camfer

    Posts: 892

    Mar 15, 2010 2:00 AM GMT
    At risk of making this into the oatmeal thread, if you don't like the texture of mushy oatmeal, don't make it that way! Make it al dente, as soft chewy flakes, like so:

    Boil a pot of water 3/4 full, like you're making a single serving of pasta. Add salt to the water. When it's a rolling boil, toss in the rolled oats. Turn down the heat to a low simmer. In a minute or two, snag an oat with a fork and taste it. If it's dry, give it another half a minute. If it's chewy, immediately pull from the heat and drain into a colander or sieve. You can then doctor it up however you like.

    But I agree you need to eat more, so count this as a side at your larger breakfast.