Breaking it down from a science

  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Jan 19, 2008 10:06 PM GMT
    Apparently many body builders and the like, love to bring science into body building making it harder for the growth impaired, like myself, with little experiance in the body building world, to understand. When the science is taken out of body building, what is left? Basically when I look at growth, all I see is heavy weight and good nutrition and supplements. Obviously there is something more to it than this and what is it ? I've been lifting somewhat heavy for a year and have little result, sure I've gotten stronger but it doesn't quite show. Maybe it's the routine or one key element is missing, it could quite possibly be that I don't understand all of these body building terms. So come on break it down to the key elements, I'm sure it'll help a lot of people who are somewhat stuck.
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    Jan 19, 2008 10:36 PM GMT
    two vital components you didn't list are technique and schedule. i also think rest is crucial.
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    Jan 19, 2008 11:25 PM GMT
    Diet: proper nutrition
    If I was to break down building muscle mass into two things, it would be 1) working out correctly and 2) eating correctly (and ad libitum)
    I bet you aren't eating as much or as well as you could be.
  • Artesin

    Posts: 482

    Jan 20, 2008 1:10 AM GMT
    libitum ?
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    Jan 20, 2008 3:51 AM GMT
    Hire a trainer for a few days and pick his brain. It is actually cheaper in the long run. He will show you technique which is hard to describe in writing and he will tell you how to get your diet and supplementation right. Shop around and you can probably find one for 30 to 35 a session. I didnt eat right and overtrained for the first 2 years because I tried to go it alone. If I had hired a trainer I would have been two years ahead instead of behind.
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    Jan 20, 2008 4:23 AM GMT
    death_dodge saidlibitum ?


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ad_lib
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    Jan 20, 2008 4:48 AM GMT
    Food
    Age
    Genes
    Technique
    Desire
    Frequency
    Recovery
    Chemicals
    Duration
    Rest
    Consistently heavier loads,with increasing power generation.

    More than anything, food, and rest.

    I'm only about 30 pounds heavier than high school. I look at weights and get bigger if I eat. Period. That's my genes.

    Main thing...EAT, EAT, EAT, EAT. Good solid food.
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    Jan 20, 2008 5:53 AM GMT
    scottNV saidShop around and you can probably find one for 30 to 35 a session.


    Scott, you get what you pay for. And for $30/session, that's probably not much trainer.

    Also, and this is to DD - I looked at your profile:

    death_dodge
    Weight training: 5 times per week
    70 minutes per session

    Cardio training: 2 times per week
    15 minutes per session

    Sports I like: Boxing, Cycling, Hockey, Kickboxing, Martial arts, Running, Skating, Snowboarding, Swimming, Weight training

    Other sports I like: Latin dance


    I think you are probably massively over-training. If you're involved in half of these activities, and training almost 6 hours a week (with only 30 minutes a week of cardio) you are not giving your body a chance to rest and grow.

    Put down the magazine workouts, and the protein shakes, and do a nice, solid, full-body workout three times a week for a while, with daily LOW INTENSITY cardio for a minimum of 20 minutes, and EAT.

    You'll see changes. If you do not, then you need to have an endocrinologist check you out.

    J.
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    Jan 20, 2008 11:54 AM GMT
    Well done big Joey

    I dont get this mentality if you are a hardgainer that you have to workout harder and longer

    You obviously have a high metabolism which hopefully you are feeding big and then you go and burn off all them calories in the gym

    Sometimes less is more!Whilst you aspire to be a body builder from your own admission you are not at that stage of the game yet and you need to get back to basics and start building a solid body.

    You can take the science out of bodybuilding but then all you are left with is someone lifting weights, it may make you stronger but not bigger
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    Jan 20, 2008 1:27 PM GMT
    paradox said[quote][cite]death_dodge said[/cite]libitum ?


    Ad libitum, or "ad lib", is used in psychology and biology to refer to the "free-feeding" weight of an animal/person, as opposed, for example, to the weight after a restricted diet. In nutritional studies, this phrase denotes providing an animal/person free access to food or water thereby allowing the animal to self-regulate intake according to its biological needs.

    Medical prescriptions may use the abbreviation ad lib. to indicate "freely" or that as much as one desires should be used.

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    Jan 21, 2008 1:26 AM GMT
    I was gonna write ad nauseum, but I don't think that's good advice icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 26, 2008 5:55 PM GMT
    PSBigJoey said[quote][cite]scottNV said[/cite]Shop around and you can probably find one for 30 to 35 a session.


    Scott, you get what you pay for. And for $30/session, that's probably not much trainer.

    Also, and this is to DD - I looked at your profile:

    death_dodge
    Weight training: 5 times per week
    70 minutes per session

    Cardio training: 2 times per week
    15 minutes per session

    Sports I like: Boxing, Cycling, Hockey, Kickboxing, Martial arts, Running, Skating, Snowboarding, Swimming, Weight training

    Other sports I like: Latin dance


    I think you are probably massively over-training. If you're involved in half of these activities, and training almost 6 hours a week (with only 30 minutes a week of cardio) you are not giving your body a chance to rest and grow.

    Put down the magazine workouts, and the protein shakes, and do a nice, solid, full-body workout three times a week for a while, with daily LOW INTENSITY cardio for a minimum of 20 minutes, and EAT.

    You'll see changes. If you do not, then you need to have an endocrinologist check you out.

    J.[/quote]

    "Put down the protein shakes?" How about the post-workout shake? I can see by his weight that he doesnt need to supplement with a shake. With his weight he can get enough protein with food but you seriously cant deny him the post workout shake.
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    Jan 28, 2008 9:30 AM GMT
    Nonstop grazing.
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    Jan 29, 2008 4:27 PM GMT
    Thanks d_d...I've had much the same questions. However, for me I think it's more a time issue along with many of the things mentioned here. Patiences is not one of my stronger suits. I'm trying to eat more (grazing) and am really finding it hard to think that eating more will help me. Especially after just dropping over 20 pounds but it's starting to make more sense.

    I've cut down on cardio for the most part to beef up on weights but that's a whole new area for me... I'm thinking the trainer might be a good way to go. I certainly can use the knowlegable help.