What is your career, or if in college, what is your career goal? Just thought it would be interesting for all to share in this way. I'll start with mine !!!

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    Jan 20, 2008 1:26 AM GMT
    Having finished High School younger than most, I was clueless as to what I wanted to do for a career. I took one year of college, then quit. Later in my 20's I went back to college, and got a degree in Business Administration, and found work as a manager of a large Housing Complex. After a few years I was able to move up by changing jobs, and took over a Government Housing and Redevelopment Authority, and here since I also had a background in building, I found what I really liked doing, because I was able to draw in State and Federal Funds and oversee the building of a lot of rental housing, and homes for folks who otherwise would not have had a place of their own. I enjoyed it, and was lucky to retire early. Its been great !!! YOUR TURN !!!!!!!!!
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    Jan 20, 2008 4:21 AM GMT
    Education: Engineering
    Current Career: Engineering/Sales/Marketing/Project Management

    I love what I do. I feel really lucky I have a job that I love right out of university. I work for an environmental company that works with municipalities to use green technologies to treat their water. Many of you are probably drinking water treated with our systems. icon_biggrin.gif

    Unlike a lot of other businesses, I know whatever we do will bring safe water to millions of people without harming the future generations.
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    Jan 20, 2008 4:29 AM GMT
    Since I'm well situated -- my goal.

    I'd like to finish spec'ing and writing a fully open sourced platform for fire and rescue emergency services; response, reporting, and training. A portable well documented system that was able to tie a large amount of resources together to make fire/rescue a much safer and more efficient feat and make reporting as error free as possible.
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    Jan 20, 2008 5:26 AM GMT
    I am way beyond anything I ever dreamed to be wildly possible...

    I want to finish my Phd this year, and retire/switch careers in another 5-10 years (A50 - 55).

    After that my goal is to teach P/T and write.

    All of that depends on what my partner ends up doing though, and the one thing I have learned is not to make those kind of plans for the future... something interesting ALWAYS comes along that just knocks the hell out of my life, sending me spinning in whole new directions.

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    Jan 20, 2008 5:27 AM GMT
    When I have FINALLY finished catching up on my debt collectors and other small bills, I would love to go back to college and finish my Photography, Acting, and business classes. Been so long I think my brain is starting to turn into some type of jelly.
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    Jan 20, 2008 5:39 AM GMT
    Going back to college to become a designer of some kind...I want to make something with artistic impact someday.
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    Jan 20, 2008 5:44 AM GMT
    I'm studying psychology of now and am graduating with a bachelor of science degree in May. However, I'm leaning towards getting a second degree in civil engineering in the following semesters.
  • Salubrious

    Posts: 420

    Jan 20, 2008 7:43 AM GMT
    Well, I'm going for a English and Women's and Gender Studies degree, after which I'll probably go to get my phd (may stop at a Masters and then teach H.S. or college.
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    Jan 20, 2008 7:55 AM GMT
    I will be done with a master's in genetics in may, but in the fall, I am going to start work on a philosophy degree. I kind of hope to bridge the divide between the empiricists and the rationalists... But smarter people have tried. I'm shooting to teach University level someday and get paid to talk and think with other people. What a dream job.
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    Jan 20, 2008 8:00 AM GMT
    I have a Bachelors in English Literature, a Master of Sciences in International Management and a 2nd masters - MBA in International Finance / Business Marketing.

    My goal always was to invest early and never have a regular job like most other people. Life is too short to be wasted in an office sitting behind a desk and doing the same thing 8-10 hours a day for the rest of your life. I am 30 and quit my first and only job at 26... now I have enough investments to live off from and travel all over the world.
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    Jan 20, 2008 8:16 AM GMT
    I don't want a career, I want to work as little as possible. I prefer my leisure time and spending time with my family and friends. I think there's to much emphasis on work in our culture.
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    Jan 20, 2008 11:55 AM GMT
    After retiring from the Army I got a BA in telecommunications with a focus on broadcast journalism and political science. I was hoping to become part of a major network news team overseas in Iraq or Afghanistan. No one has hired me to do that so I am an insurance agent.
    I'd rather be working overseas but this is OK for now.
    What I'd really rather do is go back into the Army. Civilian life is so boring and petty. Since I lost the hearing in one ear and am over 50, the Army appears to not want my services anymore. I'd rather shoot insurgents instead of photographing the bastards.

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    Jan 20, 2008 12:53 PM GMT
    I think jasonmericson has a really good point. Still.......

    Work has always appealed to me. When I was a kid I was selling greeting cards door-to-door, mowing lawns, setting up iced coffee stands (yes as crazy as it sounds).

    I dropped out university after three semesters because it seemed like a titanic waste of money and I was dying to start my own business. That adventure took me out of Texas and off to the big city at 18.

    This has all been such an adventure and my work has taken me to places that I never could have imagined as remotely possible.

    The fundamental curiosity and restlessness that drove me at 13 is still with me (maybe more so today).

    I love spending time on my boat but my competitive nature makes me want to race her (and I do, not too successfully but respectably). My partner wants to sail around the world but I just can't see that happening.

    My goals these days are to keep up my health so I can keep exploring, making, and building new things.

    My partner and I love India and the charity work we are doing there really excites me. I am pretty convinced that entrepreneurial charity, micro-business development, and similar things are out there on the horizon.

    The frontiers of technology (where I have been privileged to spend most of my career) always fascinate and I really feel that we are on the edge of very exciting times. It would be great to be able to be a part of that.

    An early love of mine has been architecture (at first modern architecture and then everything). That has morphed into a lot of work on historic preservation and I am hopeful that this might grow in the future.

    I never stop thinking about what I want to do, and who I want to be when I grow up.

    Cheers,
    Terry
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    Jan 20, 2008 1:52 PM GMT
    To all of you who dropped out of college...

    Try again.

    If you end up dropping out ...

    Try again.

    Education is the magic bullet to most of life’s big problems. Education brings with it increased opportunities, better employment, more stable working conditions, and CHOICE.

    College graduates earn many times what non graduates do, it is a simple fact of life. But that doesn't tell the whole story. The more education you get, the greater your choices will be in life in terms of employment, housing, food, shelter, travel, and meeting new people.

    I have a AAS, AA, BA, BS, MS and CAS while I am working on my PhD. I am not done, I don't believe in today’s changing world you can EVER stop learning if you want to improve yourself, or get ahead. I KNOW that I will never be done until the day I die.

    Get ready for the future, the only thing that is limiting you is your own fears. The one thing I have learned in my life is that educating yourself is as nescessary as eating or drinking or breathing.



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    Jan 20, 2008 2:14 PM GMT
    ITjock - I'm guessing you work in Information Technology thats why the name ITJOCK - maybe in your field its true you need to keep educating yourself to stay up to date with the changing Technology.. however I don't think getting a bunch of degrees is EDUCATION in anyway. I have 3 degrees including 2 Masters and don't think I used any of them... also most successful people either have it or they dont - meaning either they have the will / desire and brains to succeed or they simply dont. Those who have it in them to succeed do so one way or the other and those who dont - keep changing careers and getting degrees to make it.. but rarely do...
  • ShawnTX

    Posts: 2484

    Jan 20, 2008 2:26 PM GMT
    I work in the fashion industry as a make-up artist, sometimes stylist and art director.

    When I was in my early twenties I wanted to be the next big celebrity make-up artist, a life lived on airplanes and in hotel rooms, Europe, NY, LA, working all the major fashion shows, working with the biggest magazines, and the hottest celebs. Nowadays, a make-up artist at that level can make $5000-$10 000 a day, so you can understand my desire to attain that status.

    That life doesn't interest me so much anymore. I've gone back to school to eventually change career paths, and now all I really want is my man, a dog, a nice house, and a quiet, happy life.
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    Jan 20, 2008 2:55 PM GMT
    ItJock, you are correct, but I am siding with Travelstud.

    Yes I am only 20 and I have not been to college because I have been busy traveling the world, but when I compare my life to others...Theirs Sucks.

    I agree that you HAVE to go to college if you want to join the workforce. I have no idea why people want to join the workforce. I sure as hell don't. Working 9 to 5 for at least 5 days a week, and only 2 weeks vacation per year! That sounds like prostitution to me.

    When I look at my friends and compare myself to them, I pity them. Most people go to college to get the piece of paper so they can have that job that will pay them a big chunk of change so they can be happy and rich. They do not go to college to Learn. They go to pass tests and get those pieces of paper that have a shinny seal in them.

    This is my romantic side speaking right now...I wish people would actually go to school to learn.

    (Romanticisms done)Most people that I talk to say "they can never take away your education." I always correct them and tell them "you mean knowledge."

    I am not saying that college is bad. (I think it is horribly overpriced) I am saying the idea of going to college to learn has been lost because of materialistic views. I think I would like to go to college to learn a few things(God knows I need to learn proper grammar), but I will never go for "that piece of paper."

  • iHavok

    Posts: 1477

    Jan 20, 2008 2:59 PM GMT
    I've returned to school after an 8 or 9 year hiatus because i finally know what I want from school.
    I want to get my degree in kinesiology so i can be a physical therapist.

    And as someone who's doing it, I don't think the difficulty is returning to school, most of us have the habit down after 13 years of having no other option, it's the balancing act of making work and school cohabitate nicely that's the more difficult and daunting task.
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    Jan 20, 2008 3:32 PM GMT
    I am a social studies teacher. As much as I love turning my kids from fat suburban capitalists to pinko socialists the profession is getting kind of old. New York state and the US government breathing down my back, telling me what I have to teach, making the whole mess less focused on the student and more focused on the school, it just makes me ill.

    Anyone know any technical writing or editing gigs in the Portland area?
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    Jan 20, 2008 3:39 PM GMT
    Finishing my international hospitality degree, i currently work as a receptionist, and i love my job like to deal with a variety of people from all backgrounds, its diversity after all. i am also working my way up to be a part time professional speaker and cannot wait to get there.icon_smile.gif
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    Jan 20, 2008 4:30 PM GMT
    Professional Procrastinator


    Okay, the truth...

    I am currently the Business Manager for the Level One Trauma Center Emergency Department here in Richmond Virginia.

    Prior to this I dabbled in patient care when I thought I wanted to be a nurse for my early midlife crisis. I've also managed two AutoZones and a Kmart.

    I spent 6 years on active duty in the Air Force from 84 to 90. I think the proudest thing I've done which brings me the most job satisfaction is that I reenlisted into the Virginia Army National Guard in 06...and yes I am deploying to Iraq next month as a truck driver.

    Goals: Finish my accounting degree at government expense when I get back from Iraqistan and live comfortably and not always trying to juggle bills.

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    Jan 20, 2008 4:39 PM GMT
    gigman17b saidI am not saying that college is bad. (I think it is horribly overpriced) I am saying the idea of going to college to learn has been lost because of materialistic views. I think I would like to go to college to learn a few things(God knows I need to learn proper grammar), but I will never go for "that piece of paper."


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    I've never gone to college. I feel most of my skills are above average. I have a comfortable income and life. I have always been handed job offers and never had to seek them. I don't need college and feel that most of it is largely a waste of time and money. That said, I would like to attain a few degrees. I have sometimes felt that regardless of your talent and accomplishments, you are viewed with a prejudiced attitude if you haven't acquired a degree. It isn't that I need the crutch of a piece of paper, but it smooths perceptions.

    For the usual person, college fills a need for more than the obvious reason of educating. There are social skills, job skills, and life skills that are learned in the process of attending college. For a lot of people you encounter today, you often wish they paid attention through their elementary years. The percentage of people that cannot use "your" and "you're", "their" and "there" etc, seems to be increasing significantly. It could simply be that more intellectually challenged folk are getting online. The growing awareness leaves me uncomfortable.

    I don't think you need to attend college to learn most of what you need or want. I feel that you can learn everything you need prior to college, or via resources readily at your disposal. I.e. the library, the intertubes, etc. Advanced materiel is sometimes best learned by way of a specialised school. I'm the oldest of my siblings and the rest of them attended college. I have always been able to help them with their homework for core courses. For CS related courses I was often frustrated that very dated materiel and technology was the focus of the courses. Outdated hardware, outdated software, technology and programming theory long since discarded for a variety of reasons. I strongly felt that the CS courses held my brother back. Four years that he could have spent learning far more accurate and useful information and skills.

    There is far more to say but this piece is done.
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    Jan 20, 2008 5:23 PM GMT
    I don't think the value of higher education is so much in literally preparing people for careers. Its value is teaching people how to think, how to cultivate curiosity and even to understand the limits of knowing. It's also a way of being mentored.


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    Jan 20, 2008 5:41 PM GMT
    I agree with you OB, but that doesn't seem to be the American style of education. People aren't taught how to learn so much as they are taught to memorize. This is the aspect I loved about my calculus teacher. Getting the right answer wasn't as important as getting the right path to the answer. If you give an 18yo a question he has already encountered, he may have the answer quickly. Give him a question he hasn't encountered and he often gives up without effort.

    However I feel that this is something that should be taught early in elementary years. It sets the learning skills for the rest of life.
  • stevarino7

    Posts: 149

    Jan 20, 2008 5:44 PM GMT
    College taught me a whole lot more than just the major I studied for. It taught me how to make friends and keep them. How to treat people; how to respect them and be respected. I think college is more an experience and a way of socializing, rather than just going through a process in order to get a career. It was also a great way to have internships in order to see what I do like doing and what I don't. As well as a nice opportunity for tons of networking. I think without college, I would not be as mature or educated on the things that will help get me through social and economical challenges that I am sure I will some day face.

    But I do not think college is for everyone. And people can survive and be successful without it. In fact, I do not think going to college will help me make any more money than had I not gone. And that is alright with me. Some athletes decide to go straight into professional sports and they will have and see more money than I could even imagine having. So I guess that is just one example of being extremely rich and successful without a college degree.

    I just graduated in December with a BA in Art Therapy.