What is the difference between HIV and AIDS?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 17, 2010 2:13 PM GMT
    I keep hearing people say, he/she has AIDS, when they were first diagnosed with having HIV, is there a difference?
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    Mar 17, 2010 2:50 PM GMT
    ASGCville saidI keep hearing people say, he/she has AIDS, when they were first diagnosed with having HIV, is there a difference?



    Check out these links:

    http://www.essortment.com/all/hivandaids_ragh.html



    http://www.aids.org/info/hiv-aids-difference-between.html



    http://www.ehow.com/facts_5180930_difference-between-hiv-aids.html
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 17, 2010 3:04 PM GMT
    Glad I read your profile because I was pretty appauled that someone was asking the difference between HIV and AIDS!!
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Mar 17, 2010 3:05 PM GMT
    Essentially, HIV is a virus and AIDS is a syndrome you are diagnosed with when your body's t-cells drop below a certain level due to HIV... though there are some wackos out there that will try to convince you the two aren't related
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    Mar 17, 2010 3:47 PM GMT
    scotsguy saidGlad I read your profile because I was pretty appauled that someone was asking the difference between HIV and AIDS!!


    I did the same thing and read your profile. I think you ( as in your group ) believe you are providing a good service but I don't share that view.

    I think you and your groups time may be better spent really educating yourself about HIV/AIDS by going back to the start 82-83 and reading Gallo's paper on HIV and its link to 35 diseases they classified as AIDS. Learn biological terms and get mathematical skills to do statistical analysis so you can go beyond just reading the authors conclusions and determine for yourself if they proved their case.

    There are thousands and thousands of papers, studies on HIV and the relationship to the 35 diseases called AIDS. The definition has changed at least three times officially to make things work. There are two sides to every coin so I suggest you read and read, crunch numbers look at and I mean look at "raw data" and learn to think with a critical mind and learn to question with an open scientific mind. Every premise you believe to be true especially in the real scientific world is subject to questioning. It may take you years which is fine it really is a never ending process to educate yourself.

    Then maybe if something happens to you along the way you maybe able to make good intelligent decisions to save your own life.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 17, 2010 5:47 PM GMT
    So you're spamming discussion boards instead of buying ad space (which I'm sure RJ would love to have that revenue).
  • darryaz

    Posts: 186

    Mar 17, 2010 6:57 PM GMT
    andymatic saidSo you're spamming discussion boards instead of buying ad space (which I'm sure RJ would love to have that revenue).
    Well said!!
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    Mar 17, 2010 7:57 PM GMT
    I wouldn't call it spamming discussion boards, It's a straight forward question, in which there's a huge population particularly the younger generation who believes there's no difference between the two. This opens the conversation up and hopefully it can be used to educate the readers. Forum questions are always two sided and the opinions of the reader matters. This gives you the chance to educate other readers, hopefully dispelling the myths, it gives the reader the opportunity to find out for themselves by comparing answers and opening up the conversation.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 17, 2010 8:04 PM GMT
    I don't think that an AIDS service group that is non-profit would need to buy ad space. I think more than anything the question opens up a good discussion which was quickly shot down.

    It's very simple. HIV is a virus that attacks the immune system and causes a reduction in the bodies ability to fight disease. Once the body reaches a certain point (measured by low t-cell counts) and you begin to manifest disease, it is called AIDS. Some people that are recently diagnosed may surely also have the syndrome due to the length of time since infection and the aggressiveness of the virus.

    If you need further info, contact your locals HIV/AIDS service agency.

    Thanks for asking the question and for continuing to educate people.
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    Mar 17, 2010 8:39 PM GMT
    What I find offensive about the posts from ASGCville is that they are written in the first person...as if "you" really have a question. Why not post topics for general discussion like the rest of us do?

    More importantly, this is one of the first times that I've seen "you" repost a reply to one of your questions. Do you monitor your posts to make sure that correct information is being spread?
  • BronxvilleNY3...

    Posts: 101

    Mar 18, 2010 1:00 AM GMT
    HIV positive is a person who has been tested and is positive for the virus.

    AIDS is defined as a person who is HIV positive, has CD4< 200 cells/ml, or a person who has or had any opportunistic infection such as PCP, tuberculosis, cryptococosis, CMV, toxoplasmosis, Kaposi’s sarcoma, MAC etc.

    Once the person has received the diagnosis of AIDS, this person is defined as HIV/AIDS for the rest of live.

    Hopefully this helps you to understand.
  • myklet1

    Posts: 345

    Mar 18, 2010 9:05 AM GMT
    AIDS - CD4 below 200 and usually an AIDS related illness goes with it.......like wasting syndrome, pneumonia etc,

    HIV - CD4 count above 200

    But once you are diagnosed with full blown AIDS with a CD4 below 200, when your CD4 is brought above 200 you still are considered to have AIDS, it does not change to HIV
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 18, 2010 2:50 PM GMT
    I apologize for posting as a first person, it makes the question authentic and the information that the readers share is important, I'm not here to score the answers, I 'm just posting questions that I find most clients that come in to office are really asking, Genuine questions that might seem irrelevant or uneducated are typically asked by people who are getting tested for the first time. Your answers matter in gaining information about HIV prevention and sharing it with others who looking for answers and are afraid to ask.
    asgcville
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    Mar 18, 2010 3:13 PM GMT
    ASGCville saidI apologize for posting as a first person, it makes the question authentic and the information that the readers share is important, I'm not here to score the answers, I 'm just posting questions that I find most clients that come in to office are really asking, Genuine questions that might seem irrelevant or uneducated are typically asked by people who are getting tested for the first time. Your answers matter in gaining information about HIV prevention and sharing it with others who looking for answers and are afraid to ask.
    asgcville

    Apologize for nothing -- I'm glad you asked this question. The terms are indeed poorly understood, and poorly distinguished, so it's good to occasionally refresh ourselves on this issue. HIV is the viral infection itself, while AIDS is a number of conditions which can subsequently develop from that virus, as has been described here very effectively by others above. But with current treatments, a person can have HIV for years without an AIDS condition developing.

    I work with the HIV/AIDS community here, as does my partner. Indeed, I was at an HIV/AIDS agency this morning, putting in some quick volunteer work, creating a software program to track their in-kind donations of clothing, furniture, toiletries and so forth by month (and you guys think I'm glued to this computer -- bet you didn't even miss me). icon_biggrin.gif

    And we would never use the term AIDS loosely. It is always HIV. And when we walk across that building lobby, where clients are waiting for appointments, if we see someone we know we don't acknowledge them, unless they approach us. The same confidentiality that medical professionals follow is enforced on the entire staff there, even a mere volunteer like myself.

    I'm glad you took the trouble to ask this question, and that you were concerned enough to want to know the correct answer. I hope you found it, thanks to these guys here. icon_biggrin.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 18, 2010 3:29 PM GMT
    http://www.avert.org/aids-history-86.htm article about History of AIDS up to 1986
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    May 05, 2010 12:36 PM GMT
    HIV is the actual infection itself, AIDS is what happens once the immune system is compromised leading the way to other infections that may seem safe enough to a normal healthy adult or child, but become life threatening to a person with AID’s. This is caused by the reduced immune systems unfitness to fight off any infection.



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