Working Out While Tired?

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    Mar 19, 2010 1:42 AM GMT
    Hey Guys,

    Enjoy working out but I've been struggling with consistency lately. When I'm tired (sleep deprived), I sometimes feel it is unproductive to go lift, but I hate getting off schedule. Is there any truth to this? (Not exactly sure how I came up with this idea).

    Cheers
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    Mar 19, 2010 2:05 AM GMT
    oh man...nearly died on the treadmill my last work out...lifting was allright, but the last few min running : WHOLLY SHITicon_exclaim.gificon_exclaim.gif..there are days when I can move mountains but other's ...not so much icon_neutral.gif...guess as long as we have more of the good ones !
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    Mar 19, 2010 2:09 AM GMT
    I usually find that it is better to skip a workout and then go at it the next day extra hard. Otherwise, if I am really tired, I find myself just going through the motions - a waste in my opinion.
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    Mar 19, 2010 2:20 AM GMT
    sashaman saidI usually find that it is better to skip a workout and then go at it the next day extra hard. Otherwise, if I am really tired, I find myself just going through the motions - a waste in my opinion.


    yeah well I don't know about that...I think it's better to just do it, even if you are not 100% then to skip a scheduled work out...some days you go the extra mile(or two) but others, better to just do some then none .
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    Mar 19, 2010 2:24 AM GMT
    Lukas4u said
    sashaman saidI usually find that it is better to skip a workout and then go at it the next day extra hard. Otherwise, if I am really tired, I find myself just going through the motions - a waste in my opinion.


    yeah well I don't know about that...I think it's better to just do it, even if you are not 100% then to skip a scheduled work out...some days you go the extra mile(or two) but others, better to just do some then none at all, no?


    Well, I've tried both techniques. If I'm really tired and just do a half assed workout, then I figure I've pretty much wasted my time. On the other hand, I pick up the next day when I have more energy, I feel I've made better gains.

    Guess there isn't a right or wrong, just my opinion.

    I guess if you really wanted to do something, you could do some low intensity cardio when tired and then pick up with the weights the next day.
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    Mar 19, 2010 3:37 AM GMT
    Sometimes I find its hit and miss when I'm tired.

    I usually work 2nd shift hours, however a few months ago, I worked an overnight from about 6PM to 5AM the next day, went home took an hour nap and then went to an early 9AM conference. I then went to the gym at about 3PM. I felt fine and had a decent workout.

    Other times when I'm tired, I just don't feel like doing anything except going home and doing nothing. Or if I do make it to the gym, all I think about is going home and relaxing. I make my own work schedule, so I don’t have a set work schedule.
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    Mar 19, 2010 3:40 AM GMT
    I don't even bother if I'm too tired, its not going to work out so I stay home and use it as my off day. Oddly enough, this day of exhaustion normally is on Sundays...
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    Mar 19, 2010 3:47 AM GMT
    I've found that there are days when I'm tired, but then for some reason, about 10-20 minutes into the routine, I get into it. I'm a fan of consistency. I think if you skip the gym when you're tired, you're going to use it as an excuse when you just don't feel like going.

    My advice is to go anyway and hang out on the treadmill for awhile or try some warm up lifting. If you're still dragging ass after 20-30 min, then call it a day, but at least you kept up with your routine. icon_wink.gif
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    Mar 19, 2010 4:01 AM GMT
    I'm older than you (40), and I learned long ago it's always good to listen to your body. Who cares if you go off-schedule. If you have to do, for example, shoulders on a Wednesday followed by back on Thursday, but get REALLY tired on Wednesday, just rest; sleep, nap! Then do your back the following day, but don't feel like you're "missing out" on a routine. Treat your body well, and it will respond in kind. And don't feel guilty, either -- you'll be just fine.
  • 2theTEE

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    Mar 19, 2010 4:04 AM GMT
    If/when tired, I'll usually settle for a mediocre workout.

    The session won't be as long nor would I be lifting as heavy but at least I got it done. More intensity would be put forth the next day and that is how I justify my "lazy gym days".
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    Mar 19, 2010 4:08 AM GMT
    it sucks....but i chuck it up and do it anywayz...i target 6x/week....but i allow an extra day off to get to 5x/week every once in a while.....nothing less than 5x/week. EVER...lolz
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    Mar 19, 2010 4:36 AM GMT
    I have to go even when I'm tired, because one skipped day turns into two, which becomes a week.

    Then I can't move the next week after getting back into it. Heh.
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    Mar 19, 2010 4:37 AM GMT
    I usually give it the 10 minute rule. If you are still feeling tired and sluggish after 10 minutes of your workout...just take the day off.
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    Mar 19, 2010 5:37 AM GMT
    Try to focus on your sleep as part of your workout discipline. Sleep deprivation is completely counterproductive to muscle and cardiovascular conditioning.
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    Mar 19, 2010 6:05 AM GMT
    I'm with ciarsolo on this one -- consistently not making time for sufficient sleep is sort of like lifting weights on a fruit juice diet.

    If your aim in working out is simply to enjoy the workout and feel like you've been in the gym which gives you a pleasurably heightened sense of masculinity all on its own, then yes, workout when you feel good and don't workout when you feel tired.

    If your goal in lifting is to build your body as one part of a commitment to lifelong health, then not sleeping enough is like not eating enough protein or carbs to fuel your muscles, or not using good form when lifting, or smoking tobacco. No, the normal laws of biochemistry aren't magically suspended -- overloading your muscles will still trigger your body's hypertrophic mechanisms -- but you're not helping your body get the most out of your workouts, and you may be setting yourself up for psychological and physical overtraining.

    Try reading some of these articles:
    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/bbinfo.php?page=Sleep
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    Mar 19, 2010 6:48 AM GMT
    There is a lot of good sense here. Fatigue is the great enemy of training effectively. High levels of fitness require the right level of training, the right nutrition and the right amount of regular sleep. When I am tired I skip the gym and go for a walk or cycle ride for about 40 minutes, get a good night's sleep and then go back to the gym.
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    Mar 19, 2010 7:09 AM GMT
    two kinds of tiredness (1) "lazy tiredness", just can´t be bothered etc. Work out. If you still feel tired after 45 minutes then stop. Most of the time working out will give you more energy. Get a good sleep after (2) longer term tiredness, exhaustion, overtraining. Rest instead. Maybe take a week off and use your workout/travel time to have a siesta, extra 2 hours in bed etc. You can´t beat this kind of tiredness and trying makes it worse.


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    Mar 19, 2010 7:21 AM GMT
    usually when I'm tired but I know I HAVE to work out. I just drag myself to the gym and after the 2nd exercise I tend to wake up and get back into it. I like feeling pumped!
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    Mar 19, 2010 9:12 AM GMT
    I'm a former competitive track anf field guy.
    The harder you work, the more important rest become.
    And rest is not just sleeping enough, it's also programming relative rest period in your program (like one week every six or height weeks).
    You need sleep because some biochemical process occurs mostly during some phase of sleep (like groth hormone production, needed to build mass).
    You need 'relative rest' periods, because once you train to the limit of your physical abilities, you stress big time your system.
    Relative rest period allow your hormonal system to recover, and allow for micro trauma (like small tendon inflamantions) to heal appropriatly.

    As a rule of tumb, if you feel tired but have a workout planned, do it: a bad workout is a lot better than no workout, and as some said above, once you start you can feel better and better.

    But if you are tired too often, you should adjust your workout program according to your possibilities : lighter session, and/or better lifestyle (sleep, food) and/or include relative rest period.

    Relative rest is not complete rest, it has been proved than reduced activity (like 30% workload, and sport you don't usually do, or ball games etc...) helps you recover faster than complete rest.
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    Mar 19, 2010 9:45 AM GMT
    minox said... a bad workout is a lot better than no workout ...

    /This
  • tazzari

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    Mar 19, 2010 5:22 PM GMT
    Being tired or sore is the body's way of telling you it needs rest. That said, there are different kinds of tired, and you have to learn to read them. It's important to remember that training is putting money in the back. If you do it tired, you may be withrawing, rather than depositing.

    The ten-minute rule is a good one (see above); many top athletes use pulse/heart rate as in indicator: take your pulse every morning for a while, two or three minutes after waking up, to get a feel for what it normally is. If it's 5-7 beats above average, this is a good indicator that you need to rest.

    A more accurate system is to take the waking pulse, then stand up, wait one minute and take it again. Average the difference, and when the difference rises, think of resting.

    Before the World Championships one year, I asked the coach of the winner of the 50 kilometer race why his skier always won when it counted. "He rests better than anyone else." Of course, that's in the context of being very fit to begin with.

    A day or two of rest won't amount to much a few months from now - but injury or pushing yourself into being sick will.

    Nat
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    Mar 19, 2010 5:28 PM GMT
    FierceEyes saidI've found that there are days when I'm tired, but then for some reason, about 10-20 minutes into the routine, I get into it. I'm a fan of consistency. I think if you skip the gym when you're tired, you're going to use it as an excuse when you just don't feel like going.

    My advice is to go anyway and hang out on the treadmill for awhile or try some warm up lifting. If you're still dragging ass after 20-30 min, then call it a day, but at least you kept up with your routine. icon_wink.gif


    Ditto. If I force myself to get off my butt I find that I quickly snap out of my tiredness and get to it. I always end up glad I did it.
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    Mar 19, 2010 6:08 PM GMT
    HKboi said
    minox said... a bad workout is a lot better than no workout ...

    /This


    No... sorry guys, but this is wrong. People need to learn to distinguish the two kinds of tiredness (I speak as someone who had chronic fatigue syndrome, then was a triathlete and is not training full time in Pilates... I have a LOT of experience of different sorts of tiredness).

    Most of what most of you think of as tiredness is lazyness. Going to train will make you feel better. This is when you feel better after 20 mins.

    Sometimes, due to life stuff or the level of training you are doing you get to a point where you need rest more than anything else. This is over training. REST.

    Added to which I do NOT think that doing a bad workout (meaning for me one with sloppy form, decreasing reps, not working with intensity or precision) is EVER good. I WOULD agree that a SHORT workout is better than no workout (do 20 mins of HIIT, or squats, deads and bench and go home), but cannot ever see a circumstance when working out badly does you good. It would be be called "a bad workout" if it were good.
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    Mar 19, 2010 6:14 PM GMT
    I agree with Lostboy. Except on a minor point: I would do the type of quick, 20-minute workout he describes if I didn't feel rested, just to move a little bit. But I would consider that a "bad" workout. Meaning, not as good as a full workout. I don't think by "bad" they mean sloppy and reckless (maybe they do, but that's not how I read it).

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    Mar 19, 2010 6:17 PM GMT
    djdorchester saidI agree with Lostboy. Except on a minor point: I would do the type of quick, 20-minute workout he describes if I didn't feel rested, just to move a little bit. But I would consider that a "bad" workout. Meaning, not as good as a full workout. I don't think by "bad" they mean sloppy and reckless (maybe they do, but that's not how I read it).



    If you are really tired then a 20 minute gentle period of exercise is not a bad thing.. a walk, a swim or whatever. gets the blood flowing without tiring you more. What is the right work out differs at different points. Sometimes you need the hard 90 mins, sometimes the gentle 15 mins. Timing and appropriateness rather then content is what makes a workout bad (ie there is no such thing as a workout which can be labeled "good" or "bad" unless youa re talking about the contrast between sloppy/pointless and precise/focussed)