Sesamoiditis

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    Mar 22, 2010 5:18 PM GMT
    Has anyone injured their sesamoids? Sesamoids are the 2 tiny bones that 'float' under the big toe/metatarsel joint. How did you injure it? What was your treatment/recovery time?
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    Mar 22, 2010 8:29 PM GMT
    You have sesamoids in wrist too.

    I broke my left one in two during a bad fall pole vaulting.
    I got lucky, got a cast only for three months.... as those small bones are not perfused with a lot of blood, they heal quite slow.
    One month and half with cast immobilising elbow wirst and thumb, then one month and half with only the wrist and thumb.
    The doc told me it would be three month If I recovered fast, otherwise I could expect six month.
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    Mar 22, 2010 8:36 PM GMT
    It's the ones in my left foot that are awry, and they are not broken, merely 'out of place' according to the orthopedic surgeon, which is causing some severe swelling. Nothing's broken or torn. But thanks for your perspective, as I might assume I'll have a little less healing time than was required for your situation.
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    Mar 22, 2010 8:53 PM GMT
    I was merely calling for sympathy out of my sport war scares ;-)

    Feets are indedd delicate things, and the smallest bone displacement can create huge problem for running.
    I see we are about the same size and weight, but you are stilla young chap.
    For me, it's impossible to run too long now, slim or not, it's still a lot of weight on feets when you compare to maratoner typical weight.
    If I jog more than half an hour, I start to feel all sort of pain under my feets, mix of upset tendons and metacarpe articular pain.

    As you run a lot, you definitly need to to choose your sport shoes like a future bride, and test many of them to correct any pronation/suspination tendency.

    See also if you can get advice from an expert track coach. Running is natural and all, but most people do it really wrong. Even competitive long distance runner display big techincal flaws.... As long as you are young, and not too heavy, it will damage you slow enough that you won't get problem before retirement. But if you are heavier, or run really a lot, the small traumatismes on each impact of the feet on the ground accumulate and at one point, you get problems.
    A flawless strike is a lot more effective to prevent foot injuries than any shoes or corrective sole.
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    Mar 23, 2010 12:34 PM GMT
    It's interesting what you note.
    I've actually...before I was ordered to stop running...been trying to relearn my running stride foot fall in order to lessen my heel strike and run more 'naturally' with the whole/middle of the foot.
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    Mar 23, 2010 3:41 PM GMT
    Runnig is actually a complex movement.
    The general idea is that you need a correct enough aligment during the impact (head/spine/hip/kenee etc..), and to use your calf in a elastic way to absorb shock and store elastic energy.
    Depending on leg power and body weight, you put more or les power on the heel, then the weight transfer to the external side of the feet, up to big toes.

    But it's all theory, it's easy to see flaws in strike, its an art to find way to correct it.
    I was completly goofy as a kid, I spend years learning how to run.
    Find a good coach, and ask him.