Do I need to Train?

  • SoSly

    Posts: 2

    Jan 23, 2008 6:09 AM GMT
    hey there,

    I am 20 years old and ridiculously thin. I know the best way to gain weight is to adjust the diet as well as do some resistance training. However, access to a gym might be a problem for me (for now at least). So I was wondering, if I only adjusted my diet, would that work okay to gain weight?

    The thing is... if it just a diet adjustment, would I end up with excess flab/fat or a beer gut because I'm not exercising? Is it possible to look sort of toned (or at least not flabby looking) with just a diet adjustment and no exercise?

    Hopefully my question is clear... thanks for the help.
  • atxclimber

    Posts: 480

    Jan 23, 2008 6:58 AM GMT
    Yes, you would need to train. If you give your body an excess of calories without using your muscles intensely enough to signal your body to put on muscle mass, it will instead store those excess calories as fat. Fat tissue doesn't require nearly as much energy as muscle tissue to maintain, and it is a denser source of energy. From your body's perspective, if you don't tell it you need more muscle, why would it put any on? Fat is a much more efficient way to store that extra energy.
  • dfrourke

    Posts: 1062

    Jan 23, 2008 7:38 AM GMT
    SoSly...you are on to something...

    Much like our economy if you only fiddle with one variable to create needed change, you are likely to get some unexpected, unwanted, or very short term results...

    For the majority of us, it is best to look at all aspects of our physical health when we want to change something:

    - Age
    - Diet
    - Cardio
    - Weight Training

    I would work closely with a nutritionist and trainer to get a plan that encompasses all of these factors to make lasting change and start forming habits now that you can take into the decades that follow...

    - David

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 23, 2008 9:34 AM GMT
    whats wrong with doing a home workout? You may say you cant afford the weights well try this:

    Couple of cheap rucksacks and a couple of bags of kiddy play sand. Stick sand in rucksacks and lift appropriately you could do squats, deadlifts, curls, tricep extensions ........ Then throw in normal bodyweight exercises and you are good to go. OK you are limited only by the imagination.

    A friend of mine does this and jogs down to the local park with the rucksacks and then uses the climbing frames for chins and pulls etc. I envy his workout as his gym scenery is stunning

    You just need to get creative and be progressive in your workout
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 23, 2008 9:06 PM GMT
    Bodyweight workouts can do a lot for you. Varied pushups, dips, and pull ups can make a world of difference. I've done a Navy Seal workout that uses just bodyweights alone that has made guys puke. All it takes is motivation and creativity. You can run outside, you don't need a gym. Bodybuilding.com and this site have a ton of info on all sorts of outside the gym stuff you can do. Check out this article.

    http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/mahler57.htm

    Gymnasts use their own weight to workout, and they have great bodies. You can adjust your diet, but without resistance training you are going to grow in the wrong direction.



  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 24, 2008 8:22 AM GMT
    bfg1Couple of cheap rucksacks and a couple of bags of kiddy play sand. Stick sand in rucksacks and lift appropriately you could do squats, deadlifts, curls, tricep extensions ........ Then throw in normal bodyweight exercises and you are good to go. OK you are limited only by the imagination.


    I actually used a steel cable myself(the kind used on skyscraper foundations, I'd expect, LOL) and attached two canfuls of cement on each side and let it harden.

    Slightly unbalanced but pretty much alright for squats and lifting. icon_wink.gif

    And yeah, the legendary plastic bottles filled with water too. icon_razz.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Jan 24, 2008 8:50 AM GMT
    Eat.

    Here's some science from Michael Boyle and ptonthenet.com:

    Excerpt:

    The Truth About Hypertrophy

    The fact of the matter is that hypertrophy may be the goal for some clients and considered an unwanted byproduct of training by others. In either case, it should not be a great concern. The reality is, hypertrophy for most, non-anabolic using clients is very hard to come by. And one unfortunate problem with hypertrophy training is that our concept of how to train for hypertrophy has also been heavily influenced by steroid users.

    If in fact hypertrophy is the goal, then a conscious effort must be made to control the eccentric portion of the exercise to increase time under tension. If a client wants to weight train but has no desire for hypertrophy, I would perform five to six reps at a 1-0-1 tempo. In either case, I would still avoid the conventional three to four exercises per body part favored by the bodybuilding crowd. I would perform one or two exercises for each movement pattern, and if hypertrophy is the desired result, I would emphasize slower eccentric contractions.

    Another common misconception is that single joint exercise is better for hypertrophy. Again, if I had a client that was interested in hypertrophy, I would stay with basic multi-joint exercises like bench presses, front squats and chin-ups. It is amazing to watch people waste time with lateral raises and other single joint exercises when they have not even performed an overhead pressing movement. The bottom line is that the exercises that are the most beneficial are often also the most difficult to do. The body doesn’t always like a good taste of hard work. Sometimes, at least at first, it hurts.

    The public is uninformed, and often as trainers, we’re just playing along. We talk to clients about tone and about changing muscle structure (long dancers’ muscles). I just hope that people in the industry can begin to see this is salesmanship and not science. Why not tell our clients the truth? When your client says, “I don’t want to get too big,” tell him/her, “Don’t worry. Chances are we won’t train hard enough to produce much muscle mass anyway.”