Nike Lunarglide Running Shoes

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    Mar 31, 2010 4:06 AM GMT
    I recently started training for a marathon later this year, and finally found a pair of running shoes I love... I have worn Nike Pegasus for years, but the Lunarglide shoes, while stable, make it seem like you're running on pillows. Just thought I'd put that out there.
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    Mar 31, 2010 4:32 AM GMT
    I have talked with several of my running partners that swear by Nike...they all said the Lunarglides were very comfortable when new, but the great fit and comfort give way under heavy training in less than 75 miles and you are left with just another pair of uncomfortable shoes... They all said to stay with the Pegasus for the long haul....icon_cool.gif
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    Mar 31, 2010 4:37 AM GMT
    I have probably put 70 miles on mine and I lift in them as well. They are still the best shoes I have ever trained in.
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    Mar 19, 2011 3:53 PM GMT
    I started with the LunarGlides as well. I loved them. And then upgraded to the LunarGlide 2's. They have made improvements. Best running shoe I have ever had.
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    Mar 19, 2011 4:42 PM GMT
    I haven't worn the Lunarglides (is that supposed to evoke "moonwalking"?). My past experience with Nikes has been bad, but it goes to show that everyone's running and exercise shoe needs are different, and the shoe that works for you is the one that works for you, not necessarily for your buddy.

    Nikes apparently cause me to pronate in a way that's bad for my damaged knees. Great shoes for some guys, but not for me, and I simply can't wear them. Plus they tend to be too narrow for me.

    The best for me are from New Balance. Wider and don't hurt my knees. But they may not work for YOU. So while it sounds like the Lunarglides are worth looking into, just remember that because other guys, even a majority, have success with them, you may not.

    Unfortunately there's usually no way to discover this except over time. Although I've found that each of the major shoe makers tends to follow the same pattern, so if you have problems with one of their models, you'll likely have the same problems with their others. A few have offered shoes for specific pronation and other needs, but first you have to know what those are, or else you learn by trial & error. Few stores have salespeople qualified to evaluate your running & walking styles, but the wear patterns on your current footgear can offer clues.

    http://www.runnersworld.com/article/0,7120,s6-240-319-327-7727-0,00.htm