For those of you that are going/have gone to college:

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Mar 31, 2010 10:49 PM GMT
    How did you choose your major/career?
    What motivated you to choose it?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 01, 2010 3:03 AM GMT
    Trial and error. Always wanted to be a doctor, but the course load didn't go well with sports, so I switched to Economics, as I found it interesting. Didn't like the job prospects and went through a early-life crisis, decided to do something I enjoyed, and switched to an English degree. A couple yrs of corporate jobs and downsizing led me back to school for Social Work, idea of helping people appealed to me, as did the idea of licensure and being 'qualified' for a specific job. Did a non-traditional social work path, ended up in lobbying work, didn't like traveling so much. So, back to school for urban studies, always found it fascinating, and working for uni gives me free tuition. All in all, it's been an expensive headache and quite a process.

    If I had to do it over, I'd have not chose a major for at least the first year and put some serious thought into what I really wanted to do for at least the next several years, and stuck with it. Gotta choose something you want to do for a living, merely wanting to study it is not good enough.
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    Apr 02, 2010 6:56 AM GMT
    I kinda had a pretty good idea of what my academic strengths were so I based my major and minor on them. Didn't want to take classes were I would be struggling. Plus, I wanted to graduate within four years and not take any longer than that.

    Also made sure my classes were done by noon on Friday and my earliest on Monday was at 1PM.

    icon_wink.gif
  • jrs1

    Posts: 4388

    Apr 02, 2010 7:25 AM GMT
    Sociology chose me, I feel. I took an introductory course and haven't been the same since.
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    Apr 02, 2010 7:28 AM GMT
    jrs1 saidSociology chose me, I feel. I took an introductory course and haven't been the same since.


    RJ Fun Fact #2,714: JRS is on RJ only because he's doing his thesis on it. He actually finds it quite repellant.


    No, really. It's true!





    Really.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 02, 2010 7:29 AM GMT
    I took a breather and decided what I wanted to learn about. Simple as that. I refuse to spend my time in post-secondary education learning about things I could care less about.
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    Apr 02, 2010 7:29 AM GMT
    My major kind of choose me. i just choose the one major that seemed very interesting and also actually had a high demand. That's why I went with web design. At first I didn't realize what I had gotten into, but later realized I made the correct choice.
    Just go with your gut...but also do your research if it will lead to a career.
  • QHCAguy

    Posts: 138

    Apr 02, 2010 7:39 AM GMT
    i knew when i was 12 what excited me more than anything in the world. Made it my major and work at it to this day.
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    Apr 02, 2010 7:51 AM GMT
    I was born to go into film making so majoring in film was a given...however, after freshman year of college, my parents talked me into doing a double major in business - I really am interested about the economy and really good at math, so I decided to double major with Business Management. I'm gonna use both majors simultaneously and try to get into the business aspects of hollywood.

    I guess it's what you are passionate about - and some things you later find out that you love doing (as the case of my business major).
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    Apr 02, 2010 4:27 PM GMT
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    Thanks guys.
    I'm still at a complete loss- but I'm glad to read that I am not the only one.
    I've tried all sorts of things but none of them have really clicked.
    ...at 12 I'm sure the same thing excited all of us- but making a career out of that?icon_eek.gif
  • Adam_MSU

    Posts: 11

    Apr 02, 2010 5:07 PM GMT
    I could never decide what I wanted to do and still have issues with it. I started out as Pre-Med, I did completely fine but met some great friends during my freshman year who asked me if I was really sure that I wanted to be a doctor (I chose Pre-Med because my family told me that it would be a good idea) I decided that being a doctor wasn't a good suit for me. I realized that life is not about money because in the end, the important thing is coming home from work feeling satisfied with yourself.
    Now I am a French/Spanish double major. I have no idea what I'm gonna do with that, I just know that I really like languages.
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    Apr 02, 2010 10:10 PM GMT
    Anon_1990 said
    Now I am a French/Spanish double major. I have no idea what I'm gonna do with that, I just know that I really like languages.

    I'm interested in languages too... but as you said, "what can you really do with that?"
    My life coach says that language majors make great E.S.L. teachers... -but that's sort of a 'fall-back' career for any major.
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    Apr 02, 2010 10:14 PM GMT
    I did Accounting because my parents wanted me to do it and I wanted to learn about business...

    ... did it in the real world and HATED IT!

    I went back 2 years after graduating and did Strategic Management and enjoy that alot better.

    Bottom line is you may not get it right first time, but you will eventually (oh and dont listen to your parents)

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    Apr 02, 2010 10:22 PM GMT
    I thought I wanted to go into teaching going into college. I had this dream that I could teach English and Theater and have a minor in Psychology. Our school required us to do 30 hours of observation in a highschool for the very first Education class. I went to the Detroit area and sat down and watched a group of kids basically dominate the class room and the teacher turned a blind eye to the kids. I asked the teacher why she tolerated such behavior in her class room and got "Well I tried to do something when I was first hired in but I lost the point to it all and I should try but it would mean every year I would have to discipline the kids".

    I got pissed off and asked my professor more questions about teaching. I found out that in addition to adminstrative staff just giving up on their kids there is also a huge case of homophobia in most school districts. A lot of schools wouldn't dare hire me if I was an "Out" teacher for fear of what the parents might do. Apparently in Michigan, it's not unheard of for the parents of the students to go outside and start a rally on a gay teacher's lawn.

    I thought what I could do was then become a psych major and keep the theater as a minor (I was too far in to quit) and go into being a Child Protective Service worker for the state. So, that how I chose my major and minor.
  • PRDGUY

    Posts: 641

    Apr 02, 2010 10:47 PM GMT
    Was expected to work in the family business, and was glad it was a career that paid very well.
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    Apr 02, 2010 11:05 PM GMT
    A college degree in 2010 is about the same worth as a high school diploma in 2000. You've just got to have it. I don't care what your major is, as long as it's broad enough that you can get into some kind of masters program with it (because that's where we are headed - no longer do employers ask where you went to high school - they assume you have a bachelors degree now).

    The thing that sucks is the '13th -16th grade' experience, which now seems and looks a lot like high school, is an experience that costs a lot of money that many will be paying back for the next 30-50 years. Graduate school is necessary because now that everyone has a college degree, you have to have something that makes you stand out. But again, we're entering a problem where nobody has any more money left to loan or give, fewer people will be able to go to college (in the first place) and then those who do graduate will not be able to pay back any of that money. Many community college programs are beginning to phase out because these 2 year programs are for the most part useless and will never get you a job because they are too limited as to how you can use them. So you've got more and more people entering bachelors programs that, a decade ago, would have never been 'college material' and would have been working retail or telemarketing. But now that everyone is enrolled in bachelors programs, once everyone has them, they're not going to be worth much (but you still gotta have one).

    Sucks.
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    Apr 02, 2010 11:12 PM GMT
    I've changed my major 7 times during my college career. I started out in General Business Management, went to Accounting, to History, to HR, to Accounting, to History/English/Secondary Ed, Political Science and now back to Accounting...I have so many half finished degrees it's insane!
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    Apr 02, 2010 11:23 PM GMT
    . . . DuluthMN makes a good point about degree inflation (used to be known as grade inflation, by the way) . . . a BA will soon be attached to a birth certificate . . .

    . . . the main skills that will get you a job and keep you well employed are verbal/writing skills and analytical thinking (and of course work ethic, but that's a given, no?). . .

    . . . I have seen so many people fail because they can't write, edit, think, etc. . . . if you have these skills, you are employable in a wide variety of fields; and if you don't you are chum . . .

    . . . and as for motivation, in my case it's mainly by default because i consider the working part of my life to be incidental or instrumental to the real part of life . . .
  • Glorfindel

    Posts: 277

    Apr 02, 2010 11:24 PM GMT
    Undergrad: Biochemistry.

    'cause I was good at it.

    Graduate: Business

    'cause I am good at it. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 02, 2010 11:38 PM GMT
    Undergrad - Business Management/Communications and Advertising
    Grad - Master in Education and a Doctorate in Education.

    Grad school was my path - love what I do.

  • Apr 02, 2010 11:47 PM GMT
    A1EX said
    Anon_1990 said
    Now I am a French/Spanish double major. I have no idea what I'm gonna do with that, I just know that I really like languages.

    I'm interested in languages too... but as you said, "what can you really do with that?"
    My life coach says that language majors make great E.S.L. teachers... -but that's sort of a 'fall-back' career for any major.


    Language studies couple with a business/economics degrees are super useful in international business. You don't even have to major in Business Management. Just take a few courses so that you have the basic of economics and/or business. Good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 03, 2010 12:03 AM GMT
    Oh thanks guys. My thread really picked-up. Well... enough to help me out. icon_biggrin.gif
    When I was working for Target, for four months, one of General Managers actually talked to me about how retail chains are no longer willing to hire people as a Manager if they do not have a Bachelors Degree...icon_eek.gif -Usually people just get promoted into those positions.... that was about 2 years ago...
  • Space_Cowboy_...

    Posts: 3738

    Apr 03, 2010 12:07 AM GMT
    I asked myself What can I do that I can wake up 15, 20, 30 years from now and still be happy as hell doing it. and then I Chose my major icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 07, 2010 1:57 AM GMT
    In the mean time, until you find something that resonates with your passions in life, continue to go to school and get the basics under your belt.

    If you run out of basics, consider some of the following courses that (from my personal and professional experience) have a high probability of helping you in whatever situation you may find yourself in through life:

    Basic Psychology - Unless you plan on being a hermit all your life, you will interact with other people. Knowing what makes all of us tick can help you to make better relationships that can help you to be successful in the board room and in the bedroom.

    Basic Statistics - It's all about the data, how you gather it, interpret it, present it to support your conclusions.

    Project Management - Just about everything new in life and in work is a project. Knowing how to manage projects is knowing how to manage change.

    Basic Accounting - It's the language of business. And, everything is a business. Everything.

    Basic Finance - It's about being able to make business decisions based off of quantitative assessment and comparison. And, since everything is in some way a business, you will be making decisions. Gut decisions just don't carry the clout against a "decision science".

    Basic Business Law - Understanding the concepts of legal systems is invaluable to both personal and professional pursuits and situations all through life.

    Basic Marketing - Knowing what goes into creating and communicating your value propositions will help you in all areas of personal and professional life. It's about communicating persuasive value to induce compelling action.

    Geography - Knowing what places the world has to offer and where they are in relation to one another is invaluable in personal and professional life. It helps you to have a broader view on everything.

    Art History, Music History, Literature, Philosophy, Wine Technology, Meat Science, Beverage Management, and/or Commercial Food Production - Being able to talk about Art, Music, Food, Wine, Old Cars, Cigars is invaluable in both personal and especially professional life. Being able to convey personal polish through knowledge of culture not only makes you stand out, and it can get you laid as well.

    Basic Latin and/or Greek - Many languages are based on, or influenced by Latin and Greek. You'll be better able to figure out what unfamiliar words mean if you know the roots of the parts of the words.

    Golf - Although the sport itself appears to me to be more boring than death and has little to no appeal to me, I sorely regret never learning how to play. Colleges have courses in a variety of sports and physical activities. For some degrees, it is required to have some kind of physical education. Make it golf if you can. Why? Because more networking and business is REALLY done "on the links" than perhaps in any other venue.

    Hope this is of some value to you. Feel free to message me if you would like more.


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    Apr 08, 2010 9:55 PM GMT
    Hmm, if I could go back a few years, I would have went to school for psychology instead of justice administration.

    I'd still have the same career as I have now...I would definitely not change thaticon_smile.gif