Learning meditation

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 02, 2010 7:47 PM GMT
    I'm starting to look into meditation and I'm curious about other peoples experiences.

    What kind of thing did you start off with, and what did you find worked best? Was it best to simply go for a book, or was it better to go on a course and be tutored, or what?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 03, 2010 2:52 AM GMT
    I attended a buddhist sangha. The meditations were a part of a weekly get together which included a series of recitations, the vibrations of the bell, and burning of sage.

    The practice in a way forces you to relax with a vibrating bell, focuses on breath-centered consciousness, and mindfulness through reciting of beautiful stanzas that demonstrate appreciation of life. For example: http://www.blueirissangha.org/precepts.htm

    It short, it clears your mind, by taking you away from the normal day's entrenchments and illusions, and focuses you for a while on things more basically human, and makes you feel great.

    I remember that I used to walk away feeling so energized, yet calm. It is a great way to learn more and even if you are not a buddhist, usually all are welcome.

    If nothing by you is available, consider taping in a low voice, something like the precepts, burn some incense or sage, or use aromatherapy, candle etc., and use a metal object that when tapped, vibrates for a while, and listen to the vibrations and things that are beautiful, and celebrate humanity.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 03, 2010 4:15 AM GMT
    I'm a long-time meditator associated with Shambhala. There is a Shambhala group in Bristol:

    http://www.shambhala.org/centers/

    Bristol and S.W. U.K. Shambhala Meditation Group
    Bristol City Yoga, 16 Backfields Lane,
    Bristol, United Kingdom

    phone: 079 62013912
    contact: bristol@shambhala.org.uk
    bristol.shambhala.info

    Basic instructions for meditation are here:

    http://www.shambhala.org/meditation/

    Personally, I prefer meditation with a group because I find it very easy to distract myself when I meditate alone.


  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 03, 2010 12:03 PM GMT
    Keep it SIMPLE....

    5 mins a day is a respectable meditation practice. You don´t need to do 3 hour sessions every day
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 04, 2010 2:46 AM GMT
    Lostboy saidKeep it SIMPLE....

    5 mins a day is a respectable meditation practice. You don´t need to do 3 hour sessions every day


    Even stopping for a couple of minutes to be mindful of the breath is very helpful. My watch alarm is set for 2 p.m. to do that daily.

    But I try to start the day with 10 to 20 minutes of meditation. It can make a huge difference in how you interact with the world.
  • mossyjack

    Posts: 10

    Apr 05, 2010 1:46 PM GMT
    I've practiced (and taught) meditation for many years. It's one of those things that seems esoteric or obscure until you have experienced and practiced it for a while; then it becomes as easy and natural as breathing - - -quite literally.

    There are many traditions around meditation practice, but unless you already follow one, I would suggest keeping it very basic and simple. The various trappings and rituals which get wrapped around it mostly distract you from the simplicity of the act. I'm not sure about reading and tapes etc. I suppose they can help, depending on what normally works for you, but the most direct and accessible way to learn is to have someone who meditates show you how, and take you through the steps a few times.

    The easiest trappings-free technique you are likely to come across in a class might be "sitting meditation" or "breath meditation" as practiced by Tibetan Buddhism. There is something about the group energy of a meditation session that makes it easier to slip into the same state yourself. It's because whether or not you are conscious of the fact (or even regardless of your beliefs about such), your subconscious is very sensitive to the energy fields around you, including those of other people. When you meditate, your brain emits alpha wave lengths, and when you enter a room filled with other people on that wavelength, it's easy to put your own energy into resonance with the group.

    There's nothing esoteric or exotic about this. Our nervous systems operate electromagnetically. The energy fields extend some distance around our bodies, and interact with others when they come into contact, just like the way a mobile phone can cause interference with a television (only nicer for the most part).
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 05, 2010 1:48 PM GMT
    sit quietly for five minutes.... focus on nothing but breathing in and out.
    if your mind wanders, just gently catch it and bring it back.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 05, 2010 1:53 PM GMT
    If you're just beginning, you could try guided meditations, where you practice various types of visualization. I hear people say you are supposed to clear your mind when you meditate, but that's impossible. If your mind stopped you would be brain dead!
  • mossyjack

    Posts: 10

    Apr 05, 2010 3:06 PM GMT
    lawguy920 saidIf you're just beginning, you could try guided meditations, where you practice various types of visualization. I hear people say you are supposed to clear your mind when you meditate, but that's impossible. If your mind stopped you would be brain dead!


    It's not so much clearing the mind as it is learning to just allow thoughts to slip past without dwelling on them. If you try to block them, you have engaged with them, and now you are stuck. The trick is to learn to be a present but remain unattached, like somehow coating your attention with teflon. Just keep bringing it back to the breath, in and out, like the waves on a beach.

    Easier said than done, but you do get the knack fairly quickly.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 05, 2010 7:16 PM GMT
    Thanks guys, that's all really helpful!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 09, 2010 10:40 PM GMT
    there are many types of meditation but to find your own is fairly easy. when you walk outside, read newspaper or anywhere you see the first meditation class and you feel like going there it means you found it. do not use your mind and logic when choosing, feel it. then try it and practice it because for your current stage of human development this is your type meditation. if you like it and feel like continuing then do so otherwise look or should i say feel for something else.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 20, 2010 5:03 AM GMT
    http://fitmindbody.audioblog.com/rss/creation_station.xml

    This is a link to a guided meditation podcast. It might be an easier way to start than just reading, and just doing the occasional follow along is nice as my mind tends to wander a lot icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    Apr 23, 2010 1:55 AM GMT
    Muninn saidhttp://fitmindbody.audioblog.com/rss/creation_station.xml

    my mind tends to wander a lot icon_smile.gif


    That's what our minds do. They wander and they think.

    It took me a while to get the hang of just noticing my thoughts (like watching clouds move across the sky) without judging the thoughts or latching on to them.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 07, 2010 9:32 PM GMT
    My chiropractor advised me to try Tai Chi (on the basis that I'm an "active" guy, she said) so I discovered that my gym does Body Active, which incorporates elements of the same.

    I gave it a go and I enjoyed it. Never felt so stretched out, it was almost like going to the chiropractor in itself! Not sure about the meditative side though. I don't think it's quite right in that sense.