Survey Says 20-Somethings Are Lazy-Ass Do-Nothings... Not a Big Surprise, If You've Met Any

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    Apr 03, 2010 1:19 AM GMT
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36152262/ns/business-washington_post//
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    Apr 03, 2010 1:46 AM GMT

    The same as it was when we were that age...
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    Apr 03, 2010 1:49 AM GMT
    Generalizations are such ugly things, don't you think?
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    Apr 03, 2010 1:50 AM GMT
    Yep. Many of our generation were into flower power, protests, looking down our noses at Uni and college, and making enough money to PARTY!
    (and our hair styles and fashions make us cringe a little today)

    *sighs* hindsight is always 20/20 eh?
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    Apr 03, 2010 1:58 AM GMT
    meninlove said
    The same as it was when we were that age...

    Perhaps not, according to this survery:

    "In older generations, at least twice as many people cited work ethic as a badge of their age group's identity: 17 percent of boomers, 11 percent of Gen X-ers, and 10 percent of those 65 and older. The older three generations also take pride in their strong values or morals and in being "respectful," terms that hardly any millennials in the survey used."
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    Apr 03, 2010 2:02 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    meninlove said
    The same as it was when we were that age...

    Perhaps not, according to this survery:

    "In older generations, at least twice as many people cited work ethic as a badge of their age group's identity: 17 percent of boomers, 11 percent of Gen X-ers, and 10 percent of those 65 and older. The older three generations also take pride in their strong values or morals and in being "respectful," terms that hardly any millennials in the survey used."


    I suppose it would be impossible to go back in time and see if the "older generations" would cite work ethic as a badge of importance when they were 20-somethings.
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    Apr 03, 2010 2:02 AM GMT
    Hmmm...interesting stuff. I do wonder what the survey results would have been if those groups had all been interviewed when they were 20...icon_wink.gif


    -Doug
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    Apr 03, 2010 2:08 AM GMT
    meninlove saidHmmm...interesting stuff. I do wonder what the survey results would have been if those groups had all been interviewed when they were 20...icon_wink.gif


    -Doug


    Beat ya to it! nya nya nee nya nya! icon_wink.gif

    In any case, I do think this article is on to something though. I don't want to sound like everyone's grandpa (especially since I'm only 22!), but I do notice a certain lack of discipline in my peers (and sometimes in myself).

    Edit: age typo!
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    Apr 03, 2010 2:28 AM GMT
    A couple of rants.

    For one, this is a poor piece of journalism. The author takes the fact that Millennials don't define themselves by their work ethic and draws the value-laden conclusion that Baby Boomers and X'ers "have a better work ethic."

    If you actually read the survey, it asks respondents what makes their generation "distinctive." It doesn't ask whether they consider themselves hard workers. And I'd agree with the majority of respondents who said things like technology and liberal ethos are more uniquely Millennial than just about anything else.

    Personally, I view a shift away from strict work ethic as a positive trend in many ways. First of all, younger people seem to desire balanced lives and self-fulfillment more than past generations. That's where Boomers and X'ers failed. So many Millennials grew up in miserable broken homes (headed by Boomers and X'ers) that there's renewed enthusiasm for a healthy home life.

    This generation has also seen an era where strict work ethic was not linearly related to success or prestige. When they were growing up, dot.com founders became billionaires overnight in their 20s and the growth of entrepreneurship showed that intelligence and great ideas were infinitely more valuable than a willingness to put in long hours.

    So, I don't think the survey results reflect negatively on the generation in any way. In some ways, I think it could bode well for them.
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    Apr 03, 2010 2:38 AM GMT

    jeffy87 said, "Beat ya to it! nya nya nee nya nya! "

    ROFL, have pity on these poor ol' fingers and eyes!

    Well done, jeffy. icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 03, 2010 3:01 AM GMT
    meninlove saidHmmm...interesting stuff. I do wonder what the survey results would have been if those groups had all been interviewed when they were 20...icon_wink.gif

    -Doug

    A good point, which jeffy87 also makes, that might call into question the design of this survey. Are they polling all these groups today, or are these compilations of past studies, done at the same age for each generation?

    That wasn't clear to me in this article. I do tend to have a subjective sense that 20-soemthings are complete lazy fools, essentially all goofy Valley Girls but most without the benefit of substantial parental income.

    Their interests are mostly video games and cartoons, and they haven't a clue about the world around them. They are the ones Jay Leno ridicules with his Jay Walking piece, who think that Abraham Lincoln fought in the Revolutionary War, that World War II was about Vietnam, and the Great Depression happened because somebody wasn't feeling good about something.

    I've seen many generations of 20-somethings in my lifetime, and this present crop is the most hopeless of them all, even compared to the nonsensical hippies of the 1960s. They know nothing, want to know nothing, and will come to nothing.

    They may have technical skills, but no range beyond that. They remind me of Huxley's Brave New World, where everyone is specialized in the extreme, and cannot think outside the domain to which they have been bred & assigned.

    But mentioning Huxley is a dead end, since few 20-somethings will have read him, or understand what his works mean. But they can tell you all about video games, and anime, and other fluff that has no practical value. Just don't ask them about Shakespeare, or Mozart, or Newton, or Einstein. Who? Didn't one of them start a bagel store, with his brother?

    So I'll pass on the current airhead 20-somethings, and hope for something better to come along. Maybe not in my lifetime, and we'll have to carry these helpless losers until that happens (a few shining exceptions proving the rule), but I see a gap of underachievers for at least a few decades. One would like to be living in a flowering of human accomplishment & culture, but I fear I've drawn a blank. icon_sad.gif
  • masculumpedes

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    Apr 03, 2010 3:14 AM GMT
    I know of a certain 20-something young man who is absolutely wonderful in every way....icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 03, 2010 3:20 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said

    But they can tell you all about video games, and anime, and other fluff that has no practical value. icon_sad.gif




    This actually made me reactivate my World of Warcraft account. icon_cool.gif
  • creature

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    Apr 03, 2010 3:38 AM GMT
    You've ragged on people from the middle east, the french, your fellow members here on real jock, and twenty-somethings.

    Is there anyone who meets your approval?
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    Apr 03, 2010 3:45 AM GMT
    I think it's worth noting that this generation of 20 somethings have to endure the disappearance of many many jobs from the calculated change to temps/part timers working full hours from the get-go. Their previous generation in their late thirties/ mid forties had to endure this change (even worse, really), and haven't fared well without working their asses off.
    It seems a natural backlash should be expected, just as we did back in our day over other issues.

    -Doug

    PS I still think the more things change, the more they stay the same here. icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 03, 2010 3:55 AM GMT
    the context changes with every generation but the attitude , general behavior remains the same.
    It's not a cultural thing, i think it's hardwired into our brains...
    work ethics ? ask my nieces and my nephew who work over 50 hours / week.
    And they are all eager to succeed. with just the same ol materialistic values driving them. I have never seen so many luxury cars being driven by so many young people these days.

    but such criticisms go both ways
    the younger generations often criticize the baby boomers with all the afflictions of our present times. They don't yet realize they will undergo the same comments from future generations.
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:03 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said

    I do tend to have a subjective sense that 20-soemthings are complete lazy fools, essentially all goofy Valley Girls but most without the benefit of substantial parental income.



    Wow
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:21 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    ...and cannot think outside the domain to which they have been bred & assigned.
    icon_sad.gif


    Anyone else catch that morsel of delicious irony?

    Red_Vespa said
    So I'll pass on the current airhead 20-somethings, and hope for something better to come along. icon_sad.gif


    So much for "work ethic".icon_rolleyes.gif
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:24 AM GMT
    lol, you guys, Red Vespa has stated it's his subjective sense. This is OK, because we infer it means he wants other viewpoints, so all's good, eh?

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    Apr 03, 2010 4:25 AM GMT
    Something I've witnessed, and a universal complaint I've heard, is that in offices where everyone else arrives early and works late, it's the twentysomethings that are out the door by five sharp, pace themselves the hours they do put in, and jump ship for other jobs as soon as they're able. And why not? They're the generation that saw their parents get screwed after spending most of their working life at one company pulling sixty hour work weeks.
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:40 AM GMT
    ILmarathonrunner said
    Red_Vespa said
    I do tend to have a subjective sense that 20-soemthings are complete lazy fools, essentially all goofy Valley Girls but most without the benefit of substantial parental income.

    Wow

    Well, as a "professional student" at 31, per your RJ profile, I'm not entirely sure where your "Wow" is directed. But if you read my words carefully, as someone who's a holder of several Masters and anticipating a PhD as you state, you might focus on the words "tend" and "subjective." Perhaps one of your professors can translate for you, and hopefully your doctoral dissertation will not require big words.

    In any case, my post was about a survey, which I linked, but I doubt you bothered to read. My comments above that you quoted are partial summaries of that article. Please do read it, and then maybe you can send them a "wow" too.
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:43 AM GMT
    meninlove said lol, you guys, Red Vespa has stated it's his subjective sense. This is OK, because we infer it means he wants other viewpoints, so all's good, eh?

    Thank gawd for attentive readers. That was exactly my objective.
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:51 AM GMT
    funny-pictures-cat-has-an-idea-that-this
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    Apr 03, 2010 4:54 AM GMT
    jeffy87 said
    Red_Vespa said
    ...and cannot think outside the domain to which they have been bred & assigned.
    icon_sad.gif


    Anyone else catch that morsel of delicious irony?

    Red_Vespa said
    So I'll pass on the current airhead 20-somethings, and hope for something better to come along. icon_sad.gif


    So much for "work ethic".icon_rolleyes.gif

    I'm not sure that made any sense. Did you read Brave New World by Aldous Huxley, upon which my remarks were based? Do you understand about humans being genetically engineered and trained to fit into certain jobs?

    My analogy to Huxley was the extremely narrow focus of some young people today. That might be an interesting starting point for a discussion, to see if there are parallels with today's 20-somethings and the world that Huxley envisioned.
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    Apr 03, 2010 5:20 AM GMT
    Red_Vespa said
    ILmarathonrunner said
    Red_Vespa said
    I do tend to have a subjective sense that 20-soemthings are complete lazy fools, essentially all goofy Valley Girls but most without the benefit of substantial parental income.

    Wow

    Well, as a "professional student" at 31, per your RJ profile, I'm not entirely sure where your "Wow" is directed. But if you read my words carefully, as someone who's a holder of several Masters and anticipating a PhD as you state, you might focus on the words "tend" and "subjective." Perhaps one of your professors can translate for you, and hopefully your doctoral dissertation will not require big words.

    In any case, my post was about a survey, which I linked, but I doubt you bothered to read. My comments above that you quoted are partial summaries of that article. Please do read it, and then maybe you can send them a "wow" too.


    I apologize if my comment came across as attacking/rude. I did read the article, and unfortunately agree with many of the generalizations. I also know of shining exceptions. I know of many 40+ individuals whose world is incredibly small. Ignorance knows no age limitations.

    Too bad we can't read more of the stories of the average 20somethings out there who are flying under the radar, living life right, and achieving great things.