Would you live in a college town?

  • beaujangle

    Posts: 1701

    Apr 07, 2010 1:18 PM GMT
    I've read about the attractions of a college town where there is liberal politics, surrounded by well educated people and you can eye candy hotties, etc. My question is: would you choose to move there and if so, any college towns in particular? This is not a question for college students who are already there!
  • zakariahzol

    Posts: 2241

    Apr 07, 2010 2:20 PM GMT
    Depend on where you live. It my case, the university are just 10 minute away, but the student there are religious, conservative type (what do you expect living in this part of the world). The only attraction is there a lot of young , good looking men there. I use to jog around campus, enjoying the view and surrounded myself with youthful people. But nowaday, they block the entrance from any one else , except for people with passes.

    But during my student days, in USA. Yes, college town are great. I am a member of Gay Student Association. I have all kind of gay friend. Sometimes they organize dances, support group , talk and etc.

    And , yes I hook up with a lot of fellow student
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    Apr 07, 2010 2:35 PM GMT
    I've lived in a college town my entire life. Infact, I work at the university, and I can see campus from my bedroom window (kind depressing...).

    I don't think it's much different than regular towns, other than our population dropping during the summer months.
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    Apr 07, 2010 2:43 PM GMT
    College towns have ups and downs. Burlington, VT is an example: Small city, half the population is in the low 20's.

    Pro's:
    Lots of young liberal gays and plenty of homo-friendly hetero guys. Lots of cool cafes and other stores that are dirt cheap. Cheap housing. Always parties if you know people. Always drugs if your into that.

    Con's:
    Isn't much of a gay bar scene. Clubs/bars don't seem to do well at least in college towns I've been around. There is so much going on within the college community you don't need establishments.

    I guess there would be a big difference between college towns and college cities like Boston. But for the small town I'd only live there if I was either a student or younger than 30. Not to offend but if your 30+ and not a proffessor living in such a place makes you a big creeper.
  • Stephan

    Posts: 407

    Apr 07, 2010 2:45 PM GMT
    Well,
    I do live in college city, Austin, Texas... It has four major Universities and a couple of more colleges and universities right outside the city limits...

    The only, draw back to it is that it is constantly changing, and if you are looking for a relationship its kinda hard to find someone to settle down... Its a matter of choice to the individual of where you want to live and see!

    Have fun!
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    Apr 07, 2010 3:18 PM GMT
    ATC84 said
    Con's:
    Isn't much of a gay bar scene. Clubs/bars don't seem to do well at least in college towns I've been around. There is so much going on within the college community you don't need establishments.


    Really? Because our bars downtown (blocks away from campus) really suffer during the summer. They're always packed full during the school year. Most of us locals avoid them when the kids are here.
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    Apr 07, 2010 4:33 PM GMT
    ATC84 said I guess there would be a big difference between college towns and college cities like Boston. .

    Boston will give you the best of both worlds. > 100,000 students to give you that edgy vibe, plus all the grownup amenities of a sophisticated metropolis.
    The major drawback is the climate which rivals that of Warsaw.
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    Apr 07, 2010 4:40 PM GMT
    Palo Alto, California............one of the best places on Earth as far as beauty, diversity, intelligence, climate and close proximity to San Francisco, the Napa Valley, Tahoe, Monterey - Carmel, Silicon Valley & the beaches.

    icon_cool.gif
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:35 PM GMT
    I work at a university and live 2.5 miles away. My neighborhood has a good amount of college kids but they live in high rise buildings. Some other college cities in the area I would never move too. The noise, parties, lack of parking. I wouldnt be able to deal with it. I would be that neighbor that would call the police at 11:01 if there was too much noise and i wasnt able to sleep.
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:40 PM GMT
    I do live in one. The town itself is not that bad, but it's sort of an oasis in a desert of cornfields and rednecks. I just try not to get too sequestered in here and get out to the city as often as I can.
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:41 PM GMT
    No. I enjoy urban jungles too much
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:45 PM GMT
    I lived in Madison for 5 years, and if I was straight, I would have loved it. Unfortunately, the gay community there is (for the most part) polarized (more than usual) between bitchy queens and closeted frat guys.

    Also, I don't know what you guys are talking about, but ... NOTHING interferes with our bars' business ... neither summer nor -30ยบ wind-chills. icon_smile.gif
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    TheIStrat saidNo. I enjoy urban jungles too much



    Me too! Boston is an urban jungle that doubles as a college town, with at least six major universities (I went to one of them and never left the city) and many smaller ones. It's hard to imagine leaving at this point in my life, and I wouldn't even consider moving out of the city to one of the 'burbs.

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    Apr 07, 2010 5:51 PM GMT
    DjDorchester said
    TheIStrat saidNo. I enjoy urban jungles too much



    Me too! Boston is an urban jungle that doubles as a college town, with at least six major universities (I went to one of them and never left the city) and many smaller ones. It's hard to imagine leaving at this point in my life, and I wouldn't even consider moving out of the city to one of the 'burbs.



    DC has a lot of college kids too. I think 6 universities within the city, and another 6 outside it.
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    Apr 07, 2010 5:53 PM GMT
    TheIStrat said
    DjDorchester said
    TheIStrat saidNo. I enjoy urban jungles too much



    Me too! Boston is an urban jungle that doubles as a college town, with at least six major universities (I went to one of them and never left the city) and many smaller ones. It's hard to imagine leaving at this point in my life, and I wouldn't even consider moving out of the city to one of the 'burbs.



    DC has a lot of college kids too. I think 6 universities within the city, and another 6 outside it.



    So you know what I'm talkin' about.

  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 07, 2010 5:59 PM GMT
    Pretty much the only way I'll ever not live in a college town is if the college/university I end up employed by is in a large city. There's a lot to like about college towns, but honestly, I'm kind of looking toward living in or near a larger city for my post doc than I'm in now for my PhD. The sheer numbers game makes it relatively hard to date as a gay man in a college town if you're not trying to date undergrads -- there just aren't that many gay guys around, which makes it harder to find someone with mutual interest.
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    Apr 07, 2010 6:07 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidPretty much the only way I'll ever not live in a college town is if the college/university I end up employed by is in a large city. There's a lot to like about college towns, but honestly, I'm kind of looking toward living in or near a larger city for my post doc than I'm in now for my PhD. The sheer numbers game makes it relatively hard to date as a gay man in a college town if you're not trying to date undergrads -- there just aren't that many gay guys around, which makes it harder to find someone with mutual interest.



    Wait... I've read this three times and I'm not sure I understand... do you want to live in a big-city college town? Or not? I think the double-negative is throwing me off, or maybe it's the fact that it's 86 degrees and sunny out and I'm stuck inside.

  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 07, 2010 6:34 PM GMT
    I wield the power of confusion.

    A college town would be nice to live in long term. After I already have a partner. In a few years, when I graduate (assuming I don't have one by then), I'll be looking at a postdoc in Boston, most likely, with some possibilities of Austin or Seattle (among others), to improve my odds a little.
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    Apr 07, 2010 6:54 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd saidI wield the power of confusion.

    A college town would be nice to live in long term. After I already have a partner. In a few years, when I graduate (assuming I don't have one by then), I'll be looking at a postdoc in Boston, most likely, with some possibilities of Austin or Seattle (among others), to improve my odds a little.


    Boston would welcome another smart, handsome man. icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 07, 2010 7:00 PM GMT
    I lived in a college town (or just outside it), a small campus of only 15,000 students. But international, since a big attraction was the largest aviation program in the US, eclipsing even Embry Riddle, that drew students from around the world.

    And I taught there, and was the Assistant Registrar. I was also a staff & faculty advisor to our 10% Society for GLBT students.

    It was a lovely environment, very tranquil and yet intellectually stimulating. At the same time, I realized it was artificial, not representative of the real world, a kind of Shangri-La paradise without connections with the outside world. The ivory towers of the academic world, as critics say.

    Such a place has its attractions, while it has its drawbacks. What works for you is what works for you. While I can see its charm, as I slip into my dotage, the Army guy in me prefers I go down fighting in some way, to the bitter end. Better to be alive until I'm not, than be dead before I get there.
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    Apr 07, 2010 7:03 PM GMT
    I lived in a college town for 25 years before moving to the big city of Phoenix. As much as I love the big city, I am ready to move back to my former college town in Michigan. My whole family lives there or nearby and I miss them a lot.
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    Apr 07, 2010 7:05 PM GMT
    DjDorchester said
    MSUBioNerd saidI wield the power of confusion.

    A college town would be nice to live in long term. After I already have a partner. In a few years, when I graduate (assuming I don't have one by then), I'll be looking at a postdoc in Boston, most likely, with some possibilities of Austin or Seattle (among others), to improve my odds a little.


    Boston would welcome another smart, handsome man. icon_wink.gif

    Of course it would. Just pack your parka, mittens, boots, and ice scraper.
    (Accessories you won't need in Austin).
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    Apr 07, 2010 7:19 PM GMT
    TexDef07 said
    DjDorchester said
    MSUBioNerd saidI wield the power of confusion.

    A college town would be nice to live in long term. After I already have a partner. In a few years, when I graduate (assuming I don't have one by then), I'll be looking at a postdoc in Boston, most likely, with some possibilities of Austin or Seattle (among others), to improve my odds a little.


    Boston would welcome another smart, handsome man. icon_wink.gif

    Of course it would. Just pack your parka, mittens, boots, and ice scraper.
    (Accessories you won't need in Austin).



    Texas is warmer than the Northeast. I'm sure MSU appreciates the clarification. icon_lol.gif
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 07, 2010 7:36 PM GMT
    I also was born and raised in Buffalo, so it's pretty hard to scare me with talk of winter. ;) I then spent 7 years in CA, where I really missed having a winter, and was pleased to have one again when I moved to Michigan.
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    Apr 07, 2010 7:57 PM GMT
    College towns tend to trap you...a few years can easily become a few decades. You're surrounded by educated people, but unless you're a serious Renaissance Man, it can be hard to socialize with collegiate types. They tend to be bound together by their studies, even their extra-academic interests are related somehow.

    I have a few friends in ABQ that are UNM political science students, and we get along all right because our interests overlap enough. But I just went to this party that was all pre-med or med students, and it quickly became awkward.