Question about personal training

  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 10, 2010 10:58 PM GMT
    I have my first appointment for personal training ever tomorrow. I'm only a little over a month back into the gym after recovering from several months of mono, so it seems like a good time to reassess my current level of fitness and make a plan to get where I want to go. My understanding is that tomorrow will be an evaluation and discussion, while later session involve developing a routine and taking me through it.

    So, for those of you with experience: what should I be prepared to ask/tell my trainer?

    I know a few of the real basics: check what his certification is and what level of experience he has in this; be realistic about how often and for how long I am willing to exercise, have some measurable goals in mind for the next year. But I don't know what else would be productive to tell him, or what other questions I should be asking him.

    Any advice?
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 10, 2010 11:07 PM GMT
    Tip #1: Be honest with yourself on what your goals are before telling your trainer. He can only give you advice. You're the one who has to do the work.

    Tip #2: Refer to tip #1.

    Tip #3: If he's hot, ask him if he's single.

    Good luck! icon_biggrin.gif
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 10, 2010 11:44 PM GMT
    Introspection isn't the worry; if anything, I tend to overindulge on that. I'm more concerned about the potential of providing information overload.

    Some things I plan on stating/asking are extremely straightforward. I want him to teach me proper form for deadlifts, and to critique my form on a few exercises like squats and lunges and bench presses which I've had to modify because I've got a long limb/short torso combo. Clearly defined goals like being able to run a mile in 6 minutes, a 5k in 25 minutes, adding an inch to my vertical leap, and improving my hamstring flexibility so that I can touch my toes are also not an issue. It's more when I get into the somewhat amorphous goals -- things like wanting to balance out my muscular development so that my default resting state is proper posture and my ability to do an exercise is limited primarily by the muscles it's supposed to be targeting rather than a weak link somewhere else, or to shift my build toward my ideal of a diver's body -- that I wonder if those are even helpful things to say. I also tracked my food intake for a couple of weeks recently, and don't know whether a trainer would care about that, or if I should save that for trying to meet with a nutritionist here at the university

    Oh, and I have seen the trainer at the gym before. He's a nice enough looking guy, but he's old enough to be my father, so I don't think I'll be hitting on him. ;)
  • swimbikerun

    Posts: 2835

    Apr 10, 2010 11:47 PM GMT
    MSUBioNerd said ...things like wanting to balance out my muscular development so that my default resting state is proper posture...
    Nerd alert!
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 10, 2010 11:49 PM GMT
    swimbikerun said
    MSUBioNerd said ...things like wanting to balance out my muscular development so that my default resting state is proper posture...
    Nerd alert!


    You've seen the screen name, right? Truth in advertising.
  • calibro

    Posts: 8888

    Apr 10, 2010 11:50 PM GMT
    Find out what his background is in sports medicine and nutrition. Having worked at a gym and had a personal trainer, I will tell that 90 percent of them are crap. It doesn't necessarily take a genius to pass the ACE certification. This isn't to say all trainers are bad: there are amazing ones. But they usually have gone the extra leg and studied beyond the certification. Most trainers only know how to train the ideal body, i.e., theirs, so you have to pay strict attention to how you're doing. Your trainer will often push you to limits you don't think you can go to, but there will be times when you can't handle it and they'll say you can. Don't be afraid to say no or call it quits.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 4:54 AM GMT
    Ask if he can deep throat a banana.





    OK, I admit I'm not being helpful. But that's the best I can muster up tonite.

    PS So glad you're over the illness! Welcome back to the world!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 7:37 AM GMT
    If he is cute, get him to show you how to squat every time you see him. I did this with mine as he has a nice ass.

    icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 8:12 AM GMT

    My first question to all my clients is 'Why have you come to see me?' This opens up the conversation about what they want to achieve and where they want to be. Often this is not about specific goal setting but about getting into a regular routine of exercise and starting to improve overall fitness. Specific goals come after a few weeks . Enjoy and have fun!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 9:21 AM GMT
    MSUBioNerd said
    swimbikerun said
    MSUBioNerd said ...things like wanting to balance out my muscular development so that my default resting state is proper posture...
    Nerd alert!


    You've seen the screen name, right? Truth in advertising.


    YOGA!
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 11:43 AM GMT
    You have to be honest with them as if you really want bigger pecs and guns and say you want "overall fitness and strength" as it sounds nobler and less vain then he will give you a programme for overall fitness and strength and you won´t get your pecs and guns.

    I told mine I wanted to look good naked and didn´t want to get hurt in the process, but was prepared to work hard. icon_rolleyes.gif
  • MikemikeMike

    Posts: 6932

    Apr 11, 2010 2:05 PM GMT
    ask for his references! Check his certification.
  • MSUBioNerd

    Posts: 1813

    Apr 11, 2010 9:08 PM GMT
    Update:

    So I met with the trainer today. Apparently, today was a get to know me and figure out why I even want personal training day, so no charge.

    His qualifications: He's certified by the National Academy of Sports Medicine, and has been for 5 years. He works part time as a trainer and as a cycling instructor at my gym, as well as being a soccer coach in a local prep league. His primary job is as a purchasing agent in the athletic department here. And he is, I confirmed, old enough to be my father, as he's just barely shy of twice my age.

    He asked me why I was looking at a personal trainer, what my athletic history was, what my goals were (both specific fitness ones and general appearance ones), what my current workouts are like, how often and for how long I'm willing to work out, and asked what I thought I struggled with -- though next week, when he puts me through a fitness evaluation, we'll see what I actually struggle with. He also asked which types of cardio I do, and what generally causes me to stop -- for example, my lungs give out when I run, I just generally feel tired after half an hour of high intensity on an elliptical, my legs start to burn on a stationary bike, with a rowing machine I just feel sore all over if I've been doing strength training that day, and with swimming I end up slowing down which makes it harder to breathe properly.

    I told him I was looking to add some mass to my chest and back, add an inch or two to my vertical leap, improve my cardio health so I can manage a 25 minute 5k and a 6 minute mile, and increase my hamstring flexibility so I can touch my toes without bending my knees. I'm hoping to get to 165 pounds with 10% or so body fat, and am looking for a diver's build: lean, defined muscles, no vascularization. I explained that my arms and shoulders seem to be a weak link for a lot of multijoint exercises, and explained both my exercise-induced asthma and my recent battle with mono. As for my athletic history: tennis in high school, fencing in college, volleyball in grad school, with tennis and racquetball thrown in when I can find a partner. Weights began at the age of 24, and took me a year and a half to gain 15 pounds.

    From this, he's currently planning on having me do strength training 3-4 days a week, 45-60 minutes at a time, with a full body routine rather than splits. He said he thinks my goals will be best met with explosive work: plyometrics, an odd cage-like apparatus at the gym where you start out in a squat and push up to standing on your toes holding weight-bearing handles over your head while leaning forward, and the like. He also seems to think that a BOSU ball will become a substantial part of my routine, to engage my abs in ways that are useful on a court and in life, not just on a mat.

    Whee! I'm all excited to see how this is going to pan out.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 11, 2010 10:17 PM GMT
    I like the sound of your trainer..
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 12, 2010 1:28 AM GMT
    vanfreak saidI like the sound of your trainer..


    Agree, it sounds like a good prescription for what you have in mind.
  • mossyjack

    Posts: 10

    Apr 29, 2010 5:46 PM GMT
    Hi, I'm looking to exchange my skills ( excellent deep tissue, lymphatic and sports massage / REIKI-style energy balancing ) for yours: personal fitness training. I'm in Dublin, Ireland.