CSI-RJ: What causes these symptoms after a hard workout?

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 14, 2010 1:05 AM GMT
    While discussing our day with each other, the guy that I have just begun to date told me that he had a "fainting spell" during a workout class. He has suffered from this since he was a teenager. Here's what happens:

    He says that after a strenuous workout of a group of the larger muscles of the body, he feels nauseated and faint. He doesnt feel cold, but his skin is cold to the touch. He kind of feels like he is gonna blackout, but he doesnt. He lies on the floor and rests a while and the spell passes.

    No doctor has ever been able to explain what's going on to him.

    Anybody here have guess?
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    Apr 14, 2010 1:45 AM GMT
    I had the same problem for a while. I even experienced it when I suddenly got up from sitting. It turned out the medication I was taking caused orthostatic hypotension.
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    Apr 14, 2010 1:47 AM GMT
    No guess, but a suggestion. Go to a physician for a physical!

    It's better to be safe, than....well, dead.
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    Apr 14, 2010 1:50 AM GMT
    Sounds like low blood sugar. Flex might be able to shed some insight.
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    Apr 14, 2010 1:54 AM GMT
    I would have guessed a side effect of a Staten (blood pressure med), but you say he has this condition since he was younger, so I have to ask if he has had an Angio-gram to examine his cerotic arteries? There may be some blockage or narrowing.
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    Apr 14, 2010 3:15 AM GMT
    I found this article on exercise and fainting...

    http://heartdisease.about.com/lw/Health-Medicine/Conditions-and-diseases/Fainting-and-Exercise.-1Y0.htm

    maybe he needs a cooling down period. But it didnt sound like that was the problem. I have sent the article to him.
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    Apr 14, 2010 3:23 AM GMT
    MaxFitMike saidSounds like low blood sugar.
    ^^^that^^^
    Or at least that's what it seems like from the description.
    Also sounds like he needs to see more docs 'till one can figure it out.
  • gaydocalex

    Posts: 80

    Apr 14, 2010 3:35 AM GMT
    This sounds like a cardiac problem. He could be having irregular rapid rhythm or even something called hypertrophic subaortic stenosis which causes decreased blood flow out of the heart during exercise. He should have a full cardiac evaluation before doing any more exercise since there is the risk of "sudden death" from both of these conditions.
  • tennsjock

    Posts: 349

    Apr 14, 2010 8:48 AM GMT
    I've experienced this -- used to happen every time I worked out in the morning before breakfast. Never happens if I eat something first.
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    Apr 14, 2010 11:00 AM GMT
    If the symptoms are occurring after exercise, the most common cause would be a sudden drop in blood pressure. Normally when one does upright exercising there is a rise in systolic blood pressure (the upper number) and a slight fall in the diastolic blood pressure (lower number). The systolic blood pressure should slowly drop back to normal during an active cool down period. If one sits rather than actively cools down, the blood will be pooled in the periphery unable to reach the brain. The blood pressure will drop precipitously. The lack of blood supply to the brain can result in dizziness, nausea and even passing out. Some people are more sensitive and have a larger drop. While most people don't pass out after an injection, sensitive individuals can.
    The normal drop in blood pressure can be made worse by certain medications (especially blood pressure medications). Inadequate hydration prior to exercise will worsen the problem.

    Inadequate nutrition prior to exercise can result in a low blood sugar which can cause dizziness.

    Hydration, adequate nutrition, and an active cool down period may be helpful in these situations.

    Unfortunately there are less common causes which can be lethal.
    If the systolic blood pressure does not rise with exercise, there will be dizziness and possibly a loss of consciousness. Sudden death can occur. The blood pressure does not rise when blood is prevented from exiting the heart. The most common conditions causing a blockage are aortic stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common cause of sudden death in young athletes.

    With coronary artery disease, the diastolic pressure may actually rise rather than fall. Blood pressure is always checked during a cardiac stress test. Chest pain and shortness of breath are not always present in coronary artery disease. Weakness or dizziness can be the only symptoms.
    There are also abnormalities of the heart rhythm which can occur with exercise. These can have similar symptoms and also cause sudden death.
    There other serious medical problems that can cause similar symptoms.

    Anyone with these symptoms should have a thorough physical by a physician to rule out a serious medical problem. Do not assume the symptoms are benign!
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    Apr 14, 2010 11:13 AM GMT
    Don't walk behind him up a flight of stairs. I had a guy fall on me once when he fell backwards coming out of the metro. He was this tall Belgian guy, like 6'6" or something ridiculous and I'm a proud but shorter 5'7". When I fell backwards, he crushed me right into the two women behind me.

    That unpleasant incident is also the only time my face has ever been mashed up against the side of a not entirely unpleasant female breast.

    Now if you're big enough (and quick enough) to break his fall, lucky him.