Belief In God Plummets Among Younger Generation. UPDATE: only half of people under 30 believe in God

  • metta

    Posts: 39107

    Apr 18, 2010 8:19 AM GMT
    Belief In God Plummets Among Younger Generation


    http://www.dailykos.com/storyonly/2010/4/17/858249/-Belief-In-God-Plummets-Among-Younger-Generation
  • Delivis

    Posts: 2332

    Apr 18, 2010 7:07 PM GMT
    One can hope the trend continues..icon_smile.gif

    Though it has always been true that religiosity is always highest among the very young (as they are indocrinated) and the very old (as fear of death sets in) and that the least religious age, on average, is the teenage to early adult period.
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    Apr 18, 2010 7:58 PM GMT
    Religion, for all it's intents and purposes, has always been the basis of more negative than positive. War, death, hatred, bigotry, segregation, etc.

    As to the decline of the belief in god, all I can say is: Thank god!
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    Apr 18, 2010 7:59 PM GMT
    Everything is cyclical. Besides I think in general more people embrace God as they age and start to think about their mortality.

    Eh, what're you gonna do?!
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    Apr 18, 2010 8:19 PM GMT
    How very encouraging.

    As folks become more educated, they become less superstitious, and more inclined to move towards truth-based belief systems, as opposed to cults, religions, witchcraft and other false belief systems.

    There is hope.

    We must continue to take a firm stand against false belief systems, whatever their origins, or names. They have always been, and will continue to be, the basis of hate, intolerance, guilt, and more evil than any other source.
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    Apr 18, 2010 8:29 PM GMT
    Japultra saidReligion, for all it's intents and purposes, has always been the basis of more negative than positive. War, death, hatred, bigotry, segregation, etc.

    As to the decline of the belief in god, all I can say is: Thank god!


    amen! icon_wink.gif
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    Apr 18, 2010 8:55 PM GMT
    Thank the internet. Seriously. As mentioned above, more education leads to less superstition. It also allows people to study religion, ask questions, and find common beliefs without fear of their small town pastor or church members finding out and scolding them for their burgeoning atheistic questioning.

    I'm talking a bit tongue in cheek, but realistically, there is some truth to it. In rural Tennessee, as in many parts of the south and midwest, there is a tangible hostility toward those who are not Christian. Without the internet, it would be difficult for young people to explore doubts about the religion there were typically born into and forced to believe during their youth.

    But with the internet, people can learn about other religions, see how similar the traditions are, and conclude, like me, that the whole thing is a bunch of mythological tradition with no basis in reality.

    The internet also exposes people to opposing information, scientific information, that informs their views about how old the earth really is versus how old the church says it is, and allows them to form educated decisions that naturally lead them to question what the church tells them.
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    Nov 14, 2010 12:35 AM GMT
    Japultra saidReligion, for all it's intents and purposes, has always been the basis of more negative than positive. War, death, hatred, bigotry, segregation, etc.
    As to the decline of the belief in god, all I can say is: Thank god!


    I don't believe what you said is a fair assessment. It's just that we don't hear about all the good. People love talking about the bad, but rarely spread news about the good. It is unbalanced. So young persons making decisions on faith often don't have a fair "bigger picture", rather only what is reported in the general mass media, which is more often the case, reporting bad news and pop culture which skews true religion.

    There are LOTS that religion has done for people that are very positive, the very least, giving people hope, purpose, and meaning in life and a moral impetus and accountability for selflessly loving one another person. Another is giving them a community to which to belong and through which to find identity, support, and the exercise of love beyond self.

    The foolish myth that people need to really get over (and to stop perpetuating through ignorance) is that you have to check your brain at the door before walking into a church. You don't. And that you don't need to commit intellectual suicide to be a religious/spiritual person. (Yes, there are some who do, but that's their personal issue, not descriptive of or prescriptive for all persons of faith.)
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    Nov 14, 2010 12:46 AM GMT
    TerraFirma said
    Japultra saidReligion, for all it's intents and purposes, has always been the basis of more negative than positive. War, death, hatred, bigotry, segregation, etc.
    As to the decline of the belief in god, all I can say is: Thank god!


    I don't believe what you said is a fair assessment. It's just that we don't hear about all the good. People love talking about the bad, but rarely spread news about the good. It is unbalanced. So young persons making decisions on faith often don't have a fair "bigger picture", rather only what is reported in the general mass media, which is more often the case, reporting bad news and pop culture which skews true religion.

    There are LOTS that religion has done for people that are very positive, the very least, giving people hope, purpose, and meaning in life and a moral impetus and accountability for selflessly loving one another person. Another is giving them a community to which to belong and through which to find identity, support, and the exercise of love beyond self.


    It was not religion that gives those things. You can have those things without religion.

    empathy and morality does not require religion at all, nor does having a sense of purpose or the ability to love selflessly.


    Religion actively discourages some ofthose things by setting up "non believers"as an enemy that "God" wants smited or converted.


    Religion thus institionalises permissible classes to persecute.

    That far outweighs the good things you list - all of which can exist just fine without religion.

    If religion made people moral how come the prisons are full of professed Christians or Muslims - but not atheists?

    Maybe becauase atheists are not permitted moral relativism in the name of "God" - their conscience is always closer than any external (or eternal) "God" There is no forgiveness after token penance and cleansing rituals.



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    Nov 14, 2010 12:48 AM GMT
    TerraFirma said
    Japultra saidReligion, for all it's intents and purposes, has always been the basis of more negative than positive. War, death, hatred, bigotry, segregation, etc.
    As to the decline of the belief in god, all I can say is: Thank god!


    I don't believe what you said is a fair assessment. It's just that we don't hear about all the good. People love talking about the bad, but rarely spread news about the good. It is unbalanced. So young persons making decisions on faith often don't have a fair "bigger picture", rather only what is reported in the general mass media, which is more often the case, reporting bad news and pop culture which skews true religion.

    There are LOTS that religion has done for people that are very positive, the very least, giving people hope, purpose, and meaning in life and a moral impetus and accountability for selflessly loving one another person. Another is giving them a community to which to belong and through which to find identity, support, and the exercise of love beyond self.

    The foolish myth that people need to really get over (and to stop perpetuating through ignorance) is that you have to check your brain at the door before walking into a church. You don't. And that you don't need to commit intellectual suicide to be a religious/spiritual person. (Yes, there are some who do, but that's their personal issue, not descriptive of or prescriptive for all persons of faith.)



    Oh, just shut up, will you.

    Religion has never done anything good that had religion as a necessary component.

    And if you need somebody else to chew out the meaning of life for you and shove it down your throat, together with what's good and bad, you're just a moron. Every single bit of "community" or "spirituality" or "sense of belonging" that religion supposedly gives you does NOT have religion as an essential part, and more often it's just an easy way out for people who dont want to think for themselves or can't think for themselves because they're idiots.

    It's not intellectual suicide, cause if you're being lured in by those people you were never intellectually alive to begin with. And equating religion to "love"... that's just a very very bad joke.

    Religion is going down, and I applaud it. Maybe one day we will indeed see a world like John Lennon imagined it: "nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too".
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    Nov 14, 2010 12:53 AM GMT
    Tazo995 saidOh, just shut up, will you.
    Religion has never done anything good that had religion as a necessary component.

    And if you need somebody else to chew out the meaning of life for you and shove it down your throat, together with what's good and bad, you're just a moron. Every single bit of "community" or "spirituality" or "sense of belonging" that religion supposedly gives you does NOT have religion as an essential part, and more often it's just an easy way out for people who dont want to think for themselves or can't think for themselves because they're idiots.

    It's not intellectual suicide, cause if you're being lured in by those people you were never intellectually alive to begin with. And equating religion to "love"... that's just a very very bad joke.

    Religion is going down, and I applaud it. Maybe one day we will indeed see a world like John Lennon imagined it: "nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too".


    I understand your frustration with those who claim to be religious and do horrible things in the name of God/religion. But there's no need to extrapolate that to the rest of those who are good, faithful people who find religion to be very powerful and positive and through which they have brought much good to society in so many ways. Such a broad sweeping generalization is neither kind nor tolerant.
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    Nov 14, 2010 12:53 AM GMT
    Meh, i guess i'm among the few that think that religion has the right intention.. however peoples interpritation of it and thought proccess of religion is what's flawed. Religion in itself isn't bad. People just need to understand that the "Rules and regulations" that they're supposidly following were written what what point in time? over 2000 years ago. Stuff we do today has not even been thought of back then.

    I'm agnostic myself. However, even i can see that the basis of religion isn't a bad one. I feel all that it is, is simply "Be a kind and gentle person, don't judge others and worry about what's going on in your own life before you try to make changes in other peoples lives". If people would just learn that and keep a n open mind when reading their "Scriptures" i don't see a problem with it.

    I've met some very kind christians that have had no problems with me being gay or arab (they assumed i was muslim before asking.. yet didn't treate me any differently). They're very forward thinking and they don't judge gays. People like them are definately okay in my book.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:02 AM GMT
    TerraFirma said
    Tazo995 saidOh, just shut up, will you.
    Religion has never done anything good that had religion as a necessary component.

    And if you need somebody else to chew out the meaning of life for you and shove it down your throat, together with what's good and bad, you're just a moron. Every single bit of "community" or "spirituality" or "sense of belonging" that religion supposedly gives you does NOT have religion as an essential part, and more often it's just an easy way out for people who dont want to think for themselves or can't think for themselves because they're idiots.

    It's not intellectual suicide, cause if you're being lured in by those people you were never intellectually alive to begin with. And equating religion to "love"... that's just a very very bad joke.

    Religion is going down, and I applaud it. Maybe one day we will indeed see a world like John Lennon imagined it: "nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too".


    I understand your frustration with those who claim to be religious and do horrible things in the name of God/religion. But there's no need to extrapolate that to the rest of those who are good, faithful people who find religion to be very powerful and positive and through which they have brought much good to society in so many ways. Such a broad sweeping generalization is neither kind nor tolerant.


    Speaking of broad sweeping generalizations, where is all this "so much good to society"? I haven't been able to spot any of it in anywhere.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:06 AM GMT
    Samm77 saidMeh, i guess i'm among the few that think that religion has the right intention.. however peoples interpritation of it and thought proccess of religion is what's flawed. Religion in itself isn't bad. People just need to understand that the "Rules and regulations" that they're supposidly following were written what what point in time? over 2000 years ago. Stuff we do today has not even been thought of back then.

    I'm agnostic myself. However, even i can see that the basis of religion isn't a bad one. I feel all that it is, is simply "Be a kind and gentle person, don't judge others and worry about what's going on in your own life before you try to make changes in other peoples lives". If people would just learn that and keep a n open mind when reading their "Scriptures" i don't see a problem with it.

    I've met some very kind christians that have had no problems with me being gay or arab (they assumed i was muslim before asking.. yet didn't treate me any differently). They're very forward thinking and they don't judge gays. People like them are definately okay in my book.



    Ok, so 2 things:

    1. Stockholm syndrome

    2. The basis of religon is bad - it just distracts from reality, and puts a power structure in place based on hot air. I find it very very disturbing that people give religion any credit for values like living your life as a gentle and good person, not judging, not stealing, not killing, etc etc. Religion has broken these values very often to begin with, and religion is NOT an essential component of ANY of those.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:07 AM GMT
    Not surprising. Levels of depression have also been rising, especially among that demographic, and atheists are more likely to go all the way with depression than theists, per the UW sociology department. I'm not religious (though I have some spiritual beliefs) but I think the whole "one with the ground" outlook is pretty fucking morbid.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:15 AM GMT
    Fearthefall said... but I think the whole "one with the ground" outlook is pretty fucking morbid.


    what is "one with the ground" outlook?
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:16 AM GMT
    wushu18t said
    Fearthefall said... but I think the whole "one with the ground" outlook is pretty fucking morbid.


    what is "one with the ground" outlook?


    The belief in nothing after death.
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Nov 14, 2010 1:20 AM GMT
    The more I deepen my belief in what I call "God", the less I believe in religion.

    Signing on to any strict belief system seems antithetical to having real faith, for me, personally. Even if that system of belief is "scientific".

    I have a personal faith, which I neither proselytize nor insist upon others, and it has proofs and evidence that I'm always testing and retesting as I mature. I own it, as opposed to being owned by it, and I try very hard to practice it. I practice prayer as part of that.

    What often catches me off-guard is theocratic politics and policy, including the new-vogue for arrogant assumption that someone is foolish or less intelligent or delusional for having any faith in something that can't be tested in a lab. I see it as a knee-jerk response to having been bullied by Churches, so I understand its origins but I don't care for its equally as dogmatic doctrine of "logic" that postures much like people who are so damned sure that they can "cure" homosexuality. I don't care to be diagnosed by the camp of either cock-sure collective, frankly and it all stinks like the same snake oil, only in different bottles.

    A religious bully is a religious bully, whether he's a mega-church pastor with a MDiv or an atheist with a PhD in physics.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:21 AM GMT
    Stephen Hawking on death:
    http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2029483,00.htmlWhat do you believe happens to our consciousness after death? —Elliot Giberson, SEATTLE
    I think the brain is essentially a computer and consciousness is like a computer program. It will cease to run when the computer is turned off. Theoretically, it could be re-created on a neural network, but that would be very difficult, as it would require all one's memories.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:22 AM GMT
    Now that's what I call The Good News.
  • swimmer8671

    Posts: 429

    Nov 14, 2010 1:23 AM GMT
    I'm not a big believer in god. Its just so unimportant for me in reality. It seems like religion is a giant crutch for alot of people who want a reason to hate and discriminate.

    I have many personal values and principles that i follow and they resemble a few of the rules that many religions lay out. I just want to be a good person and i don't need to follow a religion to do that. I can be honest, and trustworthy, and nice, and loyal, and responsible, without being affiliated with a religion to define me.

    An old quote i rely on is, Your no more a christian just because you go to church, then i am a car because i'm standing in my garage.

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    Nov 14, 2010 1:31 AM GMT
    Samm77 saidMeh, i guess i'm among the few that think that religion has the right intention.. however peoples interpritation of it and thought proccess of religion is what's flawed. Religion in itself isn't bad. People just need to understand that the "Rules and regulations" that they're supposidly following were written what what point in time? over 2000 years ago. Stuff we do today has not even been thought of back then.

    I'm agnostic myself. However, even i can see that the basis of religion isn't a bad one. I feel all that it is, is simply "Be a kind and gentle person, don't judge others and worry about what's going on in your own life before you try to make changes in other peoples lives". If people would just learn that and keep a n open mind when reading their "Scriptures" i don't see a problem with it.

    I've met some very kind christians that have had no problems with me being gay or arab (they assumed i was muslim before asking.. yet didn't treate me any differently). They're very forward thinking and they don't judge gays. People like them are definately okay in my book.


    Agreed.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:38 AM GMT
    Fearthefall saidNot surprising. Levels of depression have also been rising, especially among that demographic, and atheists are more likely to go all the way with depression than theists, per the UW sociology department. I'm not religious (though I have some spiritual beliefs) but I think the whole "one with the ground" outlook is pretty fucking morbid.


    It's not morbid, it's just the way of things. Nothing lasts forever. Get used to it.
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    Nov 14, 2010 1:41 AM GMT
    Fearthefall said
    wushu18t said
    Fearthefall said... but I think the whole "one with the ground" outlook is pretty fucking morbid.


    what is "one with the ground" outlook?


    The belief in nothing after death.


    how is that morbid? it's what happens. it's reality. the bodies of my relatives are in the ground right now. i accept it, i loved them, i still love them.
  • MuscleComeBac...

    Posts: 2376

    Nov 14, 2010 1:42 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidI am not a supporter of religions but I do believe that we have a spiritual component within ourselves that many people deny. Sadly, I do not see a step in evolution with respect to our lives as people do nothing to nurture this part of themselves. People are breaking away from religion but as some people here have stated, it is not making us any better.

    Look at some of the people who claim they are better off for not believing in anything. Who is someone to tell me that I hold false belief systems just because he does not agree? Are his true? Or the people here using inappropriate language and referring to other people as "moron" and telling them hostilely to shut up thus attempting to usurp another person's freedom of speech. This type of behavior is just as wretched as a devout Christian who refers to me as a sinner and who harshly judges me. It is the same level of arrogance and pompousness and since these people are not religious it leads me to conclude that this type of behavior is unmistakably human and has nothing to do with religion at all. And it is apparent that they are miserable sons of bitches who evidently cannot express themselves in a dignified manner.


    QFT