Bing

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2010 9:52 AM GMT
    I binged myself out of curiosity and found this letter to the editor from 1992 that I had long since forgotten I had written. It was interesting to me to see that my values haven't really changed:


    Los Angeles Times
    Crime And Homophobia
    August 16, 1992

    In America, it is not a crime to murder a homosexual man or woman ("The Good Boy," by Brenda Bell, July 12). In some corridors of this country, such an action is considered a public service. All you need is the right lawyer, and the jury will give Billy a medal.

    In the same Simi Valley courthouse where Rodney G. King was humiliated, Anthony Diaz received a sentence of only four years and eight months for the 1991 gay-bashing murder of Bruce Pope and the looting of Pope's Port Hueneme home. Against the protest of the judge, the jury reduced the sentence from murder to assault after Diaz's attorney characterized the victim as a "predatory homosexual."

    It's a terrible, bitter irony that we allow our failure as a society to be blamed on the victim.

    TERRY GLENN PHIPPS

    Venice
  • silverfox

    Posts: 3178

    Apr 18, 2010 11:01 AM GMT
    UrsaMajor saidI binged myself out of curiosity and found this letter to the editor from 1992 that I had long since forgotten I had written. It was interesting to me to see that my values haven't really changed:


    Los Angeles Times
    Crime And Homophobia
    August 16, 1992

    In America, it is not a crime to murder a homosexual man or woman ("The Good Boy," by Brenda Bell, July 12). In some corridors of this country, such an action is considered a public service. All you need is the right lawyer, and the jury will give Billy a medal.

    In the same Simi Valley courthouse where Rodney G. King was humiliated, Anthony Diaz received a sentence of only four years and eight months for the 1991 gay-bashing murder of Bruce Pope and the looting of Pope's Port Hueneme home. Against the protest of the judge, the jury reduced the sentence from murder to assault after Diaz's attorney characterized the victim as a "predatory homosexual."

    It's a terrible, bitter irony that we allow our failure as a society to be blamed on the victim.

    TERRY GLENN PHIPPS

    Venice



    Your values haven't changed, and then it got me thinking......has anything really changed in regards to issues like these since 1992? The same headlines could be published today and it wouldn't be that big of a surprise.

    Also, it is interesting that you "Binged". I didn't know anyone used that search engine unless forced. icon_smile.gif
  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 18, 2010 11:56 AM GMT
    @Silverfox

    Actually, that was the point of posting this. I really wonder how much things have changed.

    Obviously, the changes that have come to the law are very recent. There hasn't been much testing of federal hate crimes legislation yet.

    For the moment I don't think the hate crimes situation has improved at all. Usually, social progress is accompanied by increases in rage and backlash (look at the Tea Party and the reaction to the Obama Presidency).

    When I really sat down and pondered the question, however, I think things have changed tremendously since 1992.
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    Apr 18, 2010 11:57 AM GMT
    Oh BTW, I was just curious about Bing. It would be hard to find a more anti-Microsoft geek than I. Still, I have to say, I rather like Bing.