SLR cameras

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    Apr 25, 2010 4:10 AM GMT
    hi guys! i want to buy a new camera because my camera broke and i was thinking of buying an SLR camera because i really want to take up photography and i enjoy the quality of the picture. anyone know any good ones? thanks you guys! icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 25, 2010 4:12 AM GMT
    The quality comes from the lens and light, not the body.

    http://www.modelmayhem.com/po.php?thread_id=241856
    Look for "Camera-related"
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    Apr 25, 2010 10:50 AM GMT
    Try this site. They have some great reviews on a variety of cameras, from low cost point and shoots to expensive DSLRs.

    http://cameralabs.com/

    Amazon.com is also a good place to check out reviews.
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    Apr 25, 2010 12:14 PM GMT
    Two things are important, first is how good and experienced are you now. This is important since, you don't want to buy a good camera until you've enough knowledge and experience to know what features you're most likely to require.

    Secondly, given the information above, there's a huge range of good cameras and if you're just starting, then you want a camera that's generally flexible. I[d probably recommend a low end DSLR by Nikon, or Canon to start with. preferably with a standard mount interchangeable lens. The body does contribute a lot to quality, but that's dependent on how you're defining quality. For me, because of application, I needed a high bit-depth camera for the purpose of image manipulation (retouching etc.) and that adds a big cost to the price. If you don't know about or understand 'bit depth' then that feature wouldn't be important to you. I didn't need mpg compatibility, so that was a feature I didn't have to address. Additionally, there are features of higher end cameras that require that the camera be heavier or larger. This can be a drawback if your learning and want to carry your camera everywhere and portability is possible. Many of those lower cost cameras can produce a good image. It's just a matter of making sure you get enough flexibility to make it a good learning tool.

    The four basic items you want for learning are:
    1 Reasonably high resolution (10 Megapixel +)
    2 Interchangeable lens
    3 Aperature override
    4 Shutter overide

    Like playing a musical instrument, the quality of the instrument only becomes apparent when the photographer has developed the skill and knowledge of the art and craft to utilize that quality.

    So, learn first with a low end camera, then graduate up a more costly camera.

    If you're looking at film, that adds an additional cost of processing (either self done, which I'd recommend, or local lab, which you need to find) and it would change the megapixel issue to 35mm instead as the minimum.
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    Apr 25, 2010 1:16 PM GMT
    There is nothing inherently better about an SLR camera beyond the ability to see what you are photographing with a reasonable degree of accuracy through the actual lens. While that is not a small benefit, it is not of use to everyone. I say that in the belief that the best camera is the one that you are actually going to use.

    I will use my partner as a case in point. Michael is an amateur photographer whose work is on a professional level. He is a professional videographer. He has every piece of equipment imaginable. However, he isn't necessarily able to tote that stuff around while he is doing the sports stuff that he enjoys.

    I bought him a compact Leica rangefinder, the D-Lux 4. That is a medium priced and fairly high quality piece (I believe there is a Lumix equivalent). The real advantage is that he is able to slip the camera in his hiking pants and take it wherever he goes.

    His most spectacular photographs (as is the case with most people) are the result of being in the right place, at the right time, and with a camera handy.

    Lugging around a DSLR is a commitment. I happen to do it all the time, often including a tripod and a selection of interchangeable lenses. However, when I travel it is quite a pain in the ass.

    I agree with BG that Nikon and Canon make superb equipment. I happen to be partial to Nikon and Nikkor lenses. That said, if I were starting over today I believe that Canon has the advantage - especially with their DSLR cameras that shoot HD video (a serious investment).

    What I might recommend to you is buying a good second-hand DSLR to start with. That way your investment is fairly contained and you have a good piece of equipment.

    For example, I still use a Nikon D100 all of the time. It is a fantastic camera, works very quickly, and takes low noise photographs even in almost total darkness. Forgetting about megapixels and whatnot (that don't make all that much difference) that camera has been around the world with me several times and never hiccuped. You can pick one up on E-Bay or in a photo store for not a lot of money.

    Here are a couple of example pics I made with that camera:

    DSC_0010_2_2.jpg

    This is taken in total darkness without any flash with the Nikon D-100 and a Nikkor DX 12-24mm lens set at 12mm. This photo, likewise, use the camera's onboard multi-point autofocus (which is pretty great).

    DSC_0033.jpg

    This is the same setup. While this is not a perfect photo it was taken in darkness with the only light coming from the oil lamps. Also, this image was taken by me handheld, no tripod. With a tripod it would have come out perfectly. Still, I believe this demonstrates that you can do available light photography very well with a machine that is nearly 10 years old and actually pretty cheap to acquire.

    Buying second hand could give you a chance to learn what you like without shooting a hole through your wallet right off the bat.

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    Apr 25, 2010 1:58 PM GMT
    UrsaMajor said

    DSC_0010_2_2.jpg

    This is taken in total darkness without any flash with the Nikon D-100 and a Nikkor DX 12-24mm lens set at 12mm. This photo, likewise, use the camera's onboard multi-point autofocus (which is pretty great).

    DSC_0033.jpg



    These photos are GORGEOUS!!
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    Apr 25, 2010 2:03 PM GMT
    UrsaMajor said...I say that in the belief that the best camera is the one that you are actually going to use.

    ...I bought [my partner] a compact Leica rangefinder, the D-Lux 4.

    Yes, use, and use well. To me the viewing method is critical to how well I can take a photograph.

    I much prefer a rangefinder, though others believe they "see" and compose better through an SLR. While I did have SLRs during my 35mm "period" beginning in 1965, my favorite cameras were always my rangefinder Leicas. I never took photographs with the SLRs that I liked as much as with the Leicas (M-4, M-5, CL, and M-6).

    Today I just take digital snapshots, though I still prefer an optical rangefinder. I simply can't work with a screen alone, far too small and subject to lighting problems. And as you note, a DSLR is a relatively large camera, whose lens interchangeability is countered by its bulk.

    So if our OP sees himself going out on dedicated photo-taking trips, the DSLR is the most capable & versatile, with the highest image quality. If he instead will want to take pics more casually on the fly, while doing other activities, the digital compact zoom is the better choice. And this is why some people choose to have both types, when their budget allows.
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    Apr 25, 2010 3:37 PM GMT
    Wow thanks you guys! I will look into this and hopefully I'll find something! And ursa major, the pictures were spectacular! I hope I can do something like this later!
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    Apr 25, 2010 11:53 PM GMT
    If you have never used a SLR camera before, a simple, not too expensive ($500 new) quailty camera is the Canon Digital Rebel xti and xsi. Of the 15 people in my photography class, 14 people had one of these. It's one of the most popular cameras. I love it and you can do so much with it and add lenses as you are able to afford them.
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    Apr 25, 2010 11:57 PM GMT
    I LOVE my standard SLR!
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    Apr 26, 2010 12:20 AM GMT
    This was taken by my Canon xti on June 7, 2009 at 8:43 pm ETD from the observation deck of the Skylon Tower in Niagara Falls Canada:

    095

    Camera: Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi
    Exposure: 0.5
    Aperture: f/4.5
    Focal Length: 79 mm
    ISO Speed: 400
    Exposure Bias: 0 EV
    Flash: Auto, Fired, Red-eye reduction

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    Apr 28, 2010 4:23 AM GMT
    It's not an SLR, but my Canon S5 IS seems to be a pretty good beginners camera for me. It does about a bazillion things and the image stabilization helps with my shaky hands. Even with my very limited ability, I can take pics of lions and other critters from over 50 feet away at the zoo, and be able to count the hairs on their noses when I zoom in on my computer. I imagine if I knew what the hell I was doing, I could actually take some decent shots with this thing.

    Canon S5IS Pictures, Images and Photos

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  • hockeyguy99

    Posts: 126

    Apr 28, 2010 4:30 AM GMT
    I use the Canon T1i and love it
  • Timbales

    Posts: 13993

    Apr 28, 2010 6:19 PM GMT
    My bf just got one, I'll have to ask what it is. Is 15 megapixel ok?
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    Apr 28, 2010 6:28 PM GMT
    If you're not sure how you'll do with an SLR, but you want more than a point-and-shoot, try the Canon Powershot G11. It can function just fine as an automatic point-and-shoot, but it's also got a whole bunch of manual functions that make it pretty close to an SLR. Helps you to practice working with aperture, shutter speed, and ISO but for those times when you just need to shoot something fast and not fuck around, it can go completely auto.

    Pro photojournalists at my work carry them for those moments when they don't have enough time to whip out their mammoth cameras and get the settings right.

    I love my G11!

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    Apr 28, 2010 6:34 PM GMT
    GuerrillaSodomite saidIt's not an SLR, but my Canon S5 IS seems to be a pretty good beginners camera for me. It does about a bazillion things and the image stabilization helps with my shaky hands. Even with my very limited ability, I can take pics of lions and other critters from over 50 feet away at the zoo, and be able to count the hairs on their noses when I zoom in on my computer. I imagine if I knew what the hell I was doing, I could actually take some decent shots with this thing.

    Canon S5IS Pictures, Images and Photos



    I have the exact same camera and LOVE IT!.
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    Apr 28, 2010 6:37 PM GMT
    TheGuyNextDoor said
    After a while, a good photogapher can pick out a Nikon from a Canon just by how it reads skin tone.
    Very true...unless the photographer is also savvy enough with editing to match the skin tones from either camera. icon_wink.gif
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    May 19, 2010 1:41 AM GMT
    wi2sd said
    GuerrillaSodomite saidIt's not an SLR, but my Canon S5 IS seems to be a pretty good beginners camera for me. It does about a bazillion things and the image stabilization helps with my shaky hands. Even with my very limited ability, I can take pics of lions and other critters from over 50 feet away at the zoo, and be able to count the hairs on their noses when I zoom in on my computer. I imagine if I knew what the hell I was doing, I could actually take some decent shots with this thing.

    Canon S5IS Pictures, Images and Photos



    I have the exact same camera and LOVE IT!.


    Unless you plan on doing photography professionally as a business, this camera will serve the purposes that most people want and need. But, if you plan on doing photography professionally, you need an SLR camera and the Canon xsi is a nice start.
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    May 19, 2010 6:52 AM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidIt's VERY unfortunate that the SLR cameras by Canon don't accept the lenses from my traditional Canon camera.

    It kinda pisses me off that a company like Canon would not take this into consideration. I have two telephoto lenses with the EF mount that will fit the Canon Rebel body but otherwise don't work and are useless.

    One can't help but think that these are convenient ploys to get you to spend yet more money. It would have been nice to simply switch my own traditional body Canon for the Rebel XT digital. The lens alone was over $700. icon_sad.gif

    erm, huh? I've the Canon EOS 450D and it can take all the standard Canon lenses, I had the same model in film that was oooers 10 years old I think when I upgraded to a digital DSLR and all the lenses came with me, although I LOVE my 55mm... got rid of that pesky zoom and I can get photos in a hospital with minimal lighting it's just heaven for a lense icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 19, 2010 7:37 AM GMT
    You used the word camera three times in one sentence...
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    Jun 03, 2010 4:42 AM GMT
    IsmeIvan1990 saidYou used the word camera three times in one sentence...


    haha sorry! i didn't know what else to use. haha my rhetoric is horrible :p
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    Jun 07, 2010 7:22 PM GMT
    My parents got me a Canon 450D and I love it, it helps me take even better pics.