I Got To Be A Bartender Last Night

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    Apr 25, 2010 1:42 PM GMT
    So last night (Sat) hubby & I go to a private reception at a Boca Raton home given by a friend of ours. And as we walk in, among the first guests, she apologizes to us: "You'll have to fix your own drinks, the bartender didn't show up!"

    "Yes, I did!" I immediately replied. "Oh, Bob, would you seriously consider doing it?" she asked.

    "Sure, why not; I can't sing for my supper, so I might as well bartend for my bread," I joked, referring to the fact that my partner and his sister would both be singing selections themselves a little later. "Just don't expect too much, about all I can do is pour wine, and make very simple cocktails. Anything complicated and I'll just show them where the things are, if that's OK."

    "Anything, Bob, that's fine," she answered. There is full-time staff there, but I guess duties at the buffet and in the kitchen precluded running the bar, too, why our host had contracted for a professional bartender.

    Well, we had a lovely evening, with Bach & Chopin played at the piano, and various singers, including a young man who performed a love song in his native Chinese, quite unique & beautiful. My partner was in good voice, too, hamming-up "Mr. Cellophane" from Chicago like he always does, and his sister handled some difficult Italian opera selections quite nicely.

    But the real treat was Copeland Davis, a jazz pianist I've heard before, who creates marvelous improvisations and embellishments, and can do the most technically dazzling runs. And like Peter Nero used to do, he'll incorporate classical music right into the middle of a jazz standard.

    So Copeland & I sat and had a nice chat afterwards (everyone pretty well lubed by then and needing little more from the bar), a most charming man. BTW, he performed for no fee, it considered a private gathering for friends, since he's known the host many years.

    I made him a second rum & coke before I sat down, the first mixed by himself while I was busy before he played, which kinda surprised me for a professional. He pronounced it much better than his first, but I stuck with white wine for myself all night, so I wouldn't be dropping ice cubes all over the floor.

    Here's some of his music:

    http://www.copelanddavis.com/index.htm
  • Celticmusl

    Posts: 4330

    Apr 25, 2010 4:16 PM GMT
    That's like the gay wolf in charge of the hen house.
  • MilitaryWolf

    Posts: 43

    Apr 25, 2010 4:31 PM GMT
    Sounds like you had a really great night.
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    Apr 25, 2010 4:35 PM GMT
    What a random post. reads like a scene from a movie
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    Apr 25, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    PAJohn saidYou hang out with a much more high-class crowd than I do. Went to my neighbor's house last night to watch Gabourey Sidibe on SNL and I had to get my own beers out of the fridge.

    "High class" is a state of mind, not of money. I know wealthy people who are perfect pigs, and poor people who are as classy as British royalty. It's what you WANT to be. At least in the US, where social lines are less clearly drawn and enforced. Not everyone at last night's musical soirée was a millionaire.

    And who says watching SNL is less classy than listening to Italian grand opera? I happen to enjoy both. It's what you LIKE, and people of similar likes tend to gravitate to each other, so you can all enjoy the same things together.

    I have always mostly gravitated to people who enjoy the fine arts, and I guess they to me. Some of them are indeed a little snooty, so I don't bother to tell them about my motorcycle adventures, going to grungy biker bars to hang out. Because I happen to like all kinds of people, from blue collar to wing collar, provided they are decent, honest, and real.

    And maybe it's an American trait, or maybe we aren't so high-class as you presume, because I've never attended a function where every person there wouldn't help out the host with their own hands, wouldn't offer to help serve others or to serve themselves. Nobody would dare sit like an aristocrat and expect to be served like a king or queen. Your host OFFERS you service out of politeness & courtesy, but a guest would never demand it. It's just not American.
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    Apr 25, 2010 5:11 PM GMT
    Celticmusl saidThat's like the gay wolf in charge of the hen house.

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    Apr 25, 2010 5:31 PM GMT
    Excellent.....Robert my good man

    I'll take a Lemon Drop Martini icon_razz.gif
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    Apr 25, 2010 5:38 PM GMT
    MilitaryWolf saidSounds like you had a really great night.

    I think everyone there did. And honestly, we have a lot of these. In fact, we had a lovely dinner with friends at their home the night before on Friday, much of it by candlelight outdoors in the lovely Florida weather, in a marvelous garden setting. And we attended a remarkable vocal concert the previous night, our good friend their Musical Director, riding down for it with his gay partner.

    And ya know, neither of us are anything special, nor are we wealthy or famous. But we do know how to live, and where to live, and how to cultivate gay friends.

    And I relate these stories (THISUSEREXISTS, was I really "rambling"?) not to brag, as some here accuse me, but to encourage others to do the same thing, if they wish. We gay men can live enchanted lives if we wish, it's easier than many think.

    And yet I read stories of unhappiness & misery here. Well, in contrast I post my stories of fun & enjoyment. It's all waiting for you, what gay men do better than their straight counterparts, if you can just convince yourself of that fact. My partner & I don't moan about our lives, even in the hospital recently my beloved partner was smiling & laughing, we just go out and live life to the max. Or if we do moan, it's because we have too much on our plate, biting off more than we can chew. LOL!
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    Apr 25, 2010 5:49 PM GMT
    Cool story. A few months ago, I hooked up with this guy I ran across I met while he was behind me in line at a self-serve bar at a party. I poured my standard bourbon, neat (I am, at heart, a Southern boy after all), and he said "pour me one as well."

    We got to talking, I have zero gaydar, and was trying to scope him out, however clumsily. I said casually (because it just popped into my head), "can you taste the roofies?"

    He laughed, said "Nope. Let's go."

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    Apr 25, 2010 6:42 PM GMT
    mike29401 saidCool story. A few months ago, I hooked up with this guy I ran across I met while he was behind me in line at a self-serve bar at a party. I poured my standard bourbon, neat (I am, at heart, a Southern boy after all), and he said "pour me one as well."

    We got to talking, I have zero gaydar, and was trying to scope him out, however clumsily. I said casually (because it just popped into my head), "can you taste the roofies?"

    He laughed, said "Nope. Let's go."

    Well, last night I wasn't looking for anybody to say "Let's go" to me. But I will note that getting to play being the faux-bartender was almost as good as being the host.

    I knew about half the guests there, but those I didn't know I did before the end of the evening. I hate to put it into such base terms, but it's like dogs: if you wanna make friends, offer them a doggie treat.

    Humans aren't much different. And offering something, or just sharing a common experience, like standing in a line together, can be all it takes.

    After 2000 years, the Roman Latin phrase is still true: "Carpe Diem." (Seize the day, meaning also, seize the moment)