Employer "forcing" to post pictures

  • Posted by a hidden member.
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    Apr 29, 2010 11:19 PM GMT
    my friend's prospective employer wants to put a picture and a profile of him on the company website. There really is no formal or professional reason for this except that they want to be friendly to all visitors. A lot of employees on the website use it to post links to their facebook and comment on their hobbies, likes, dislikes, and other stuff. There is no resume or background info on all employees but they all have pictures and some info. When he asked if it was required to put a picture no one had thought about it, but it seemed pretty clear that there was social pressure to do so.

    He is not comfortable with having his pic and info online. What would you tell your employer to refuse to take a pic without appearing to be antisocial? I know some people say they have religious reasons can someone explain what those are and what religions do this?
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    Apr 29, 2010 11:21 PM GMT
    http://www.tineye.com
    That's a good reason not to.
    It's very likely the employer is intending on using tineye.com with their employees' pictures to see if they have other pics online, and to spy on them.
    Not fear-mongering...it's just something some places will do.

    Edit: Looks like the tineye.com website is temporarily down. Basically it's a site where you upload a pic, and it finds matches for that pic all over the internet. Upload a pic of your face, and it'll show you every pic of your face that's online...and the website/page where it's hosted.
  • Timbales

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    Apr 29, 2010 11:23 PM GMT
    I'd just say I'm not comfortable posting on line.
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    Apr 30, 2010 1:51 AM GMT
    That happened to me.

    I told my employer I preferred that my picture be taken off because of privacy concerns. They removed it right away.

    It is all you need to say. No employer wants the liability if something should happen and you sue. But if you need to rub it in, you can claim that you are being stalked.
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    Apr 30, 2010 2:17 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidhttp://www.tineye.com
    That's a good reason not to.
    It's very likely the employer is intending on using tineye.com with their employees' pictures to see if they have other pics online, and to spy on them.
    Not fear-mongering...it's just something some places will do.

    Edit: Looks like the tineye.com website is temporarily down. Basically it's a site where you upload a pic, and it finds matches for that pic all over the internet. Upload a pic of your face, and it'll show you every pic of your face that's online...and the website/page where it's hosted.


    Yikes!
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    Apr 30, 2010 2:28 AM GMT
    paulflexes saidhttp://www.tineye.com
    That's a good reason not to.
    It's very likely the employer is intending on using tineye.com with their employees' pictures to see if they have other pics online, and to spy on them.
    Not fear-mongering...it's just something some places will do.

    Edit: Looks like the tineye.com website is temporarily down. Basically it's a site where you upload a pic, and it finds matches for that pic all over the internet. Upload a pic of your face, and it'll show you every pic of your face that's online...and the website/page where it's hosted.
    This is pretty scary. However, I used the direct URL of my picture, as posted on my job's website, in the TinEye search engine. It showed 0 results, despite my face being all over the internet, lol.

    I'm guessing TinEye is limited to public places only, as is google. I'm also not sure if TinEye can handle changes in wardrobe, lighting, location, etc. It worked really well with the MonaLisa example they used in the About/Introductory video.
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    Apr 30, 2010 2:29 AM GMT
    If it's isn't something that is mandatory within the company then your friend doesn't have to do it.

    If he feels pressured into do it then he could have legal cause to go to HR and develop a case.
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    Apr 30, 2010 2:37 AM GMT
    xuaerb said
    Yikes!
    I rechecked to verify my info...looks like they still haven't gotten their face recognition software finished (been waiting on it).

    For now you can only search for the one pic you upload. I had to use it last year to find a pic that someone said had been stolen and used on a4a as a fake profile...turned out he was on quite a few other profile sites too. icon_lol.gif (ftr, I contacted the sites and had them pull the pic)
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    Apr 30, 2010 2:58 AM GMT
    Your buddy is suffering from paranoia. If he won't work with the company, his employment should be terminated. In today's world, there's no excuse for folks being picture-less and sneaking around.

    Posting pictures and names is a very good way to make employees accountable as well as presenting a much better customer service image. Folks who hide bad work behind anonymity are a cancer for customer service.

    Every employee should be uniquely identifiable to both customers, and workers.

    So much bad customer service is directly resultant of the fact that folks aren't held accountable and operate anonymously. It makes customers furious and is HORRIBLE customer service. If your buddy won't step up, he should be canned.
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    Apr 30, 2010 3:04 AM GMT
    As a part of my consulting practice, I provide guidance in Human Capital management, and Employment and Labor Law Compliance.

    Unfortunately, I know of no general statute or regulation which gives employees the right to refuse to consent to the use of their image in public for legitimate business purposes as a condition of employment.

    However, employers can allow exceptions to their policy as they see fit.

    For example, if you have a protective order against a stalker that may be a sufficient reason to request an exception to the policy.

    If the employer still says "No", you certainly have the option of not working for that employer.
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    Apr 30, 2010 3:16 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidYour buddy is suffering from paranoia.
    We know nothing about the OP or his friend.
    It's quite common for someone to have very valid reasons for anonymity.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:05 AM GMT
    If that's the case, the guy needs to work for someone else.

    Nothing makes me more pissed than dealing with Yolanda NoLastName, and being treated like shit. I make it a point to identify folks when I interact with them.

    If someone has to hide, then, something is WRONG. I say get rid of him.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:07 AM GMT
    chuckystud said
    If someone has to hide, then, something is WRONG. I say get rid of him.
    You've never had a stalker after you, have you?
    I have. It's not fun.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:08 AM GMT
    Actually, I have. You confront them, and tell them to knock it off.

    Hiding NEVER solves anything.

    As an employer, I don't want anonymous employees.

    He should be fired if he won't go along with the company line.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:16 AM GMT
    According to the OP, he hasn't been hired yet. And I agree this job is probably not a good idea, regardless of his reason. An interview works both ways: if you're not happy with the company's policies, don't work there.

    As far as confronting a stalker, that can only be done on a case by case basis. Most stalkers are not dangerous, but a handful are...can't take them all lightly. And it's REALLY funny when you tell some obnoxious creep at the nude beach to stop stalking you, and everyone gangs up on him and makes him leave (long story but really funny). icon_biggrin.gif
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:21 AM GMT
    paulflexes said
    chuckystud said
    If someone has to hide, then, something is WRONG. I say get rid of him.
    You've never had a stalker after you, have you?
    I have. It's not fun.


    I have a protective order in place against a schizo nut case. I would not want that person knowing where and when I will be anywhere.

    Telling someone to "knock it off" isn't really effective with psychotic who can cause a workplace violence incident.

    Policy as a part of a governance system is necessary for a business to be successful. But, so are reasonable, appropriate, infrequent exceptions to policy.

    In the end, would you want the blood of one or more employees (and possibly customers) on your hands and conscience for the rest of your life because you were too rigid with your policies?

    Would that be good for your brand and your business?

    Still feel the same way?

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    Apr 30, 2010 4:21 AM GMT
    Oops. My bad. "Perspective" is what I blew by on. Golly, the guy should forget about even talking to the potential employer. The employer wants to run his shop a certain way, and he has that right. If potential employee doesn't like the way he runs his business then don't work there. NEXT ITEM.

    What an idiot! He already has sticking points in the interview and STILL thinks he wants to work for them? Get over it. Keep looking for someone who will allow him to hide.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:39 AM GMT
    Just tell him to do it...we are in a recession turned depression. I would hate to see him lose his job in this market for not being subordinate icon_rolleyes.gif
  • Webster666

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    Apr 30, 2010 7:15 AM GMT
    I would say that I just didn't feel comfortable doing that.
    If anybody asked why, I'd repeat what I just said.

    As long as you're reasonably business friendly with your coworkers, while you're at work, there should be no problem.

    For a gay person, giving straight people easy access to your personal life by providing Facebook information, could prove to be very embarrassing, as well as opening the door for harassment.
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    Apr 30, 2010 7:44 AM GMT
    Is having picture profile taken necessary for the job? If it isn't then he doesn't need to have it taken and this guy's boss should just drop it and not use the rest the rest of his work group to try and pressure an employee to comply with something that can't be regulated.

    chuckystud
    Your buddy is suffering from paranoia. If he won't work with the company, his employment should be terminated. In today's world, there's no excuse for folks being picture-less and sneaking around.


    Why should he be terminated? Because he chooses not to divulge personal information about himself and picture to boot for his job? That would be like one day terminating somebody out of the blue because they were bald or because they weren't over 5'6"ft tall. Many people choose not to have online picture profile associated with jobs because quite frankly it's not mandatory. It's a matter of personal space and privacy and the company doesn't need information like this unless they are doing a questionnaire and that doesn't require a pic. Customer service comes from providing service to the customer, not providing a pic and personal information about yourself for any yahoo to look up and possibly use against you. You make it sound like because the guy chooses not to give this stuff up that he's automatically doing something and shady in his off time. If the person is then that's their business because it's their personal life and the two should never mingle unless your job requires it (very few do).

    No company anywhere that I'm aware of has a policy were it says that you must have a online profile and picture in order to do your job.
  • NursePractiti...

    Posts: 232

    Apr 30, 2010 7:53 AM GMT
    I am afraid I have to disagree with chuckystud. As a nurse who happens to be male, there are a LOT of right wing religious people who do not want a gay man in their employ. I was not aware there were sites such as tineye or anything else remotely related to it out there. I can see an employer having ulterior motives for wanting some kind of site where your pic is posted. I don't have naughty ones of myself personally, but I should be allowed to without my employer finding them. Yes, anonymity is almost impossible these days, but I don't believe an employer should be able to require anyone to post a pic of themselves or give out information unless it is job related. IE: Manager for customer services, etc.
  • Anto

    Posts: 2035

    Apr 30, 2010 8:14 AM GMT
    chuckystud saidYour buddy is suffering from paranoia. If he won't work with the company, his employment should be terminated. In today's world, there's no excuse for folks being picture-less and sneaking around.

    Posting pictures and names is a very good way to make employees accountable as well as presenting a much better customer service image. Folks who hide bad work behind anonymity are a cancer for customer service.

    Every employee should be uniquely identifiable to both customers, and workers.

    So much bad customer service is directly resultant of the fact that folks aren't held accountable and operate anonymously. It makes customers furious and is HORRIBLE customer service. If your buddy won't step up, he should be canned.


    How is it productive to hold people accountable to subjective viewpoints?
  • Timbales

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    Apr 30, 2010 12:38 PM GMT
    When I deal with my customers, they have my first and last name. It's on my e-mails, my card, my voice mails and my faxes. Why do they need a picture of me? If they are that interested, they can come meet me in the office or google me to see my Facebook pic.
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    Apr 30, 2010 4:20 PM GMT
    No employer wants the liability if something should happen. It could mean a fortune in lawsuits. All it should take to get a picture removed would be a short note to HR. They will in turn ask Legal, who will tell them to remove it. Problem solved.
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    Apr 30, 2010 7:23 PM GMT
    [quote][cite]chuckystud said[/cite]Actually, I have. You confront them, and tell them to knock it off.

    ROTFLOL!!!

    You have NEVER had a stalker or you would know that does not work. I spent 1 year in court trying to get rid of a fucking psycho.