Heading to Hawaii in June Any Suggestions?

  • conquer

    Posts: 305

    May 01, 2010 1:51 AM GMT
    I'm heading to Hawaii for about 2 wks in June. Going to backpack around, and am looking for some suggestions of places to go and some cheap places to stay. From what I've been able to gleam there aren't many hostels around, and some are down right dodgy. Any suggestions??
  • Thirdbeach

    Posts: 1364

    May 01, 2010 4:36 AM GMT
    Go to the Big Island..

    It is awesome!

    (You'll need rental car to get around)
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    May 01, 2010 4:41 AM GMT
    Don't fall in Kilauea.
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    May 01, 2010 4:52 AM GMT
    Dont go.
  • conquer

    Posts: 305

    May 01, 2010 6:06 AM GMT
    Kilauea is on the list, as is Pearl Harbour
  • Acorns

    Posts: 273

    May 01, 2010 7:07 AM GMT
    Helicopter rides are awesome... who doesn't want to ride in a helicopter?

    Relax, don't worry about scheduling things as much. Don't want to make your vacation stressful now we?
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    May 01, 2010 7:09 AM GMT
    yeah give my number out to all the hot locals ;).

    im going to be there in may, heard theres some amazing hiking trails!
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    May 01, 2010 7:14 AM GMT
    conquer saidI'm heading to Hawaii for about 2 wks in June. Going to backpack around, and am looking for some suggestions of places to go and some cheap places to stay. From what I've been able to gleam there aren't many hostels around, and some are down right dodgy. Any suggestions??ALOHA!!


    ALOHA!!

    The big Island is a dream. It has 11 of the 13 climate Zones. The most amazing rain forest and the Volcano National Park is of the charts. The rain fall, the huge water falls, the tropical rain forest and my most favorite place on earth...and I have traveled all over the world.....

    is...on the big island. It's called the "PLACE OF REFUGE" GOOGLE it and discover a dream. It's amazing and I am going there this summer to begin my relocation...that's how much I love it!!

    I rented a guest home in the rain forest in HILO for 3 weeks. Great prices and you can Google it also. I have to look for the url and I will add it back on here. I booked it through an agency that represents everyday people who open up their homes to us "HOWLIES" or

    Haole (pronounced /ˈhaʊli/, Hawaiian [ˈhɔule]) means "White person, American, Englishman, Caucasian; American, English; formerly, any foreigner; foreign, introduced, of foreign origin, as plants, pigs, chickens" [1] in the Hawaiian language; it can be used in reference to people, plants, or animals. The origins of the word predate the 1778 arrival of Captain James Cook (which is the generally accepted date of first contact with westerners), as recorded in several chants stemming from antiquity. Its use historically has ranged from descriptive to racist invective.

    YOU WILL LOVE IT!
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    May 01, 2010 7:26 AM GMT
    Don't bring sand to the beachicon_exclaim.gificon_eek.gif
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    May 01, 2010 9:33 AM GMT
    Aloha ahiahi kakou! (Good evening to all)

    Aloha e Komo Mai! (Hi and with welcome)
    Aloha ahiahi kakou! (Good evening to all)


    This is post 1 of 3

    General guidelines concerning ground travel:

    In Honolulu, renting a car will cause you to enjoy the wondrous and frustrating adventure of seeking parking (if you can find it), and paying with cubic ounces of your flesh per 1/10's of an hour. Avoid these money mills and if you have to park a few blocks away, it's worth it. Another option is to only rent a car on the day(s) when you know you will be seeing other parts of the island. Also, tow zones MEAN tow zones. Read signs and obey then carefully. It's a total buzzkill to have to go to the two lot with $175 CASH, AND be responsible for anther ticket to the City and County of Honolulu. Bus passes are GREAT! Great bus service here in Honolulu. Honolulu cops are tough. Speed, honk, don't obey crosswalks, don't slow for yellow lights, park in the wrong place, JAYWALK (yes, JAYWALK), and they will nail you, shame you, and hold you for an unreasonable amount of time just to show you a lesson. There is little mercy for tourists let alone locals. It's a revenue stream!

    Where in Hawai are you planning/thinking visiting?
    Hawai'i is an over 1500 mile long archipelago including 9 major destination islands: O'ahu, Maui, Hawai'i Island (Big Island), Kaua'i, Lanai, Moloka'i, Lana'i, Kaho'olawe, and Ni'ihau. So, when somebody says he's going to "Hawai'i" it's analogous to saying he's going to "British Columbia". More specificity in destination would be needed from the OP to help share specific recommendation.

    Have you decided which islands to visit and Exlore?
    Each island is analogous to a child in a family. Each one is unique and beautiful in its own way. Each one has its own personality. At a minimum, I suggest a visit of no less than at lest 4 full days on each island hop and actually see the islands you choose

    Caveat: Don't just spend the whole two week trip in one place, like Waikiki Beach. That would be like spending a whole vacation in a place that is a sanitized and gleaning slice (and only one slice) of what Hawai'i encompasses. 4 to 7 days miniumum per island is a good amount of time to "taste" the richer and less known treasures of each island. Two week vacation? I would suggest attempting only three islands at most.

    To help you to make up you mind which islands to see...
    (Some general suggestions at the end)

    As an FYI, the island of Ni'ihau is private and visitors are by invitation only. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niihau for more information.

    The island of Kaho'olawe is undeveloped, rural, and off limits and is generally uninhabited due to the amount of unexploded munitions that remain as island was used as a military targeting range. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kahoolawe for more informationh

    The Island of Lana'i is also rural, private but accessible, but there are two Four Seasons Resorts for tourists, food, beverage, fule, rental cars, hotels are expensive. Better bring a lot of money. And if you want some creature comfort from the mainland, either get a polite laugh accompanying a statement that they don't carry it. Or, be prepared to take out a mortgage. A jeep 4x4 is absolutely necessary. For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanai

    The Island of Molokai is very rural like all islands except O'ahu. If you do choose to go here to see the magnificent beaches and the former settlement of leppers at Kalauapapa where St. Damien of Molokai ministered to the outcasts of society, you will most likely go with a mule tour, and everything you do and buy will be very expensive (even by Hawai'i standards). A jeep 4x4 is absolutely necessary. Be prepared to pay dearly. This is one of the most unspoiled of the islands. For more information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molokai

    The islands of Maui "The Valley Isle" and Kaua'i "The Garden Isle" have a phenomenal offering of land, people, culture, sports, and other interests and activities. Lots of fun and variety, lots of places to stay.

    Maui is diverse. It has a "downtown" area called Kahului, a kind of fishing village turned craft village (ala Key West in the 1980's) called Lahaina. There are major tourist resorts, as well as pleathora of little villages accessible by cliff hugging one-lane dirt roads. And when I mean "one-lane" I don't mean "one-lane in each direction". That's and exciting Jeep 4x4 trip to make. There is also Haleakala, the volcano. Great to take the bike trip DOWN the volcano. But be prepared to get up really early in the morning for this one.

    Still on Maui (West portion of island), it's worth it to drive around the island. Go clockwise from Kahului via Lahaina, even though going counterclockwise puts you on the outside lane. Oh, and don't forget to stop at Julia's Banana Bread in the village of Kahakuloa. http://www.juliasbananabread.com/ You'll want to buy extra for the room or trip home.

    Maui island is a great island to circumnavigate in the 4x4. Careful, there may be some very narrow one-lane roads, but navigating them makes you feel alive! The views are spectacular.

    Still on Maui: The Road to Hana is very beautiful and most unusual. Most folks (we locals call them "whizzers") attempt to get up early and rush to make the 68 mile drive from Kahului to Hana at the far east point of the island. It is one of the most scenic drives in the world. It is a drive that should be taken slow. Here's the rub, when you "Whizz" out with the herd, all you see are the taillights of the person in front of you. Guess what happens after lunch when people head back...same thing. Isn't part of why you went to Hawai'i to enjoy nature in a leisurely way?.

    So, here's what I do. I know that there is a little state park in Maui called "Waianapanapa State Park". It sits on a beautiful black sand beach awash with some of the deepest blue water and amid green vegetation, and papaya groves you could imagine. There are cabins there (and these are really cabins, so if you're all into fancy, this is not for you). These cabins run about $40 a night and can sleep 8 people or more. There is limited electricity, and no internet or cell service. There is a little Hana Market where you can get good cheese, smoked Wahoo, good wine and other munchies. Getting a reservation here is hard, and takes considerable planning and prepayment with the State Park system. But if you can even snag a cabin for one night, it's worth it.

    Here's why. The Whizzers are generally out of the way by about 10:00am. That's when I leave Kahului with clear road going my way, I can leisurely enjoy the views, make stops, and get to Waianapanapa State Park right around the time that the Whizzers have eaten lunch satisfied their curiosity with the black sand beach, and are now heading back to Kahului...sniffing each other's tail pipe exhaust. I've now got the park and the beach to myself and friends. We check into the cabin and enjoy the rest of the day. We either bring our feast, or go to the Hana Market and look around for some local grown caught delicacy to add to our dinner. We eat, spend a quiet
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    May 01, 2010 9:36 AM GMT
    Don't get caught in the undertoe.
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    May 01, 2010 10:03 AM GMT
    Aloha e Komo Mai! (Hi and with welcome)
    Aloha ahiahi kakou! (Good evening to all)


    This is post 2 of 3

    Continuing suggestions for a trip to Hawai'i

    Still on Maui: Hiking is everywhere. But, it's especially fun at Makena Beach by Kihei. There's "Little Beach" and "Big Beach" at Makena. Big beach is a golden orange crescent of fluffy cocina shell sand. Gorgeous. Big Beach is where most families and others go to sun and play. Little Beach requires one to climb a small bluff over the a secluded crescent of the same kind of beach. Why go? Because Hawai'i does not have any official nude beaches. I'll leave it at that and to your imagination. The hiking at Makena can be quite fun, especially for those who have any kind of naturist sex fantasies.
    More info about Maui at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maui/

    Kaua'i is the Garden Isle. It is a lush green "older sister" of the other islands (the islands are younger to older from east to west). The Kalalau Trail is a hikers paradise and challenge. It is a hike into the NaPali Coastal area...some of the most breathtaking cliffs in the world. Not for the casual hiker. There is a certain point on the hike where a sign indicates that you may not go farther unless you have an overnight camping permit. It is assumed that you would not make it back before nightfall if you went further. Kaua'i has other beautiful aspects, a helicopter tour over this island is highly recommended. I used "Jack Harter" and was very pleased with the tour. Get the maxed out 90 minute package, it's worth it. www.helicopters-kauai.com

    O'ahu, where Honolulu is located, is an island where 80% of the population OF THE STATE is concentrated into 20% of the island of O'ahu. The town area of Honolulu is bustling, busy and has a great public transportation network. There are oodles of hikes. Some favorites include Maunawili Falls, Diamond Head, Mariners Ridge, Aiea Loop, Ke'alia (moderately difficult), Judd Trail (short and easy). There are guide books worth investing in depending on which islands you choose to visit. Lot's to see that's free. Don't get suckered into just staying and visiting Waikiki Beach. That's kind of like our “Disney”.

    continued...
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    May 01, 2010 10:27 AM GMT
    sublstyley saidyeah give my number out to all the hot locals ;).

    im going to be there in may, heard theres some amazing hiking trails!


    It's the "off trail" paths to secluded and sometimes breathtaking spots that really make the hiking experience orgasmic.
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    May 01, 2010 10:50 AM GMT
    Which island or islands are you going to?

    If you are going to the Big Island, be sure to take a helicopter ride over the volcanos.

    If you are going to Oahu, the USS Arizona memorial is a must see.

    Have fun.
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    May 01, 2010 10:51 AM GMT
    Aloha e Komo Mai! (Hi and with welcome)
    Aloha ahiahi kakou! (Good evening to all)


    This is post 3 of 3

    Continuing suggestions for a trip to Hawai'i

    Hawai'i Island (aka “The Big Island”) The Big Island is huge. It is larger in size than all of the other Hawai'ian Islands combined. In comparative size, it is the size of Los Angeles County, California. There is much to do there, and 4 days is truly insufficient to see this island. Here is a link to more information, and specific locations of interest. [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawaii_(island)[/url].

    BE WARNED!!! There is currently a significant amount of "vog" (volcanic smog high in sulfur dioxide) that is creating a respiratory health hazard island-wide. Any persons with acute respiratory sensitivity should consider visiting other islands in the state.

    OP: What is your budget for lodging? Will there be others with whom you will be traveling with whom you can share costs? There are oodles of non-brand name hotels that can be really inexpensive, and even more so if you're travelling with or sharing accommodations.

    OP:
    Have you considered "Couchsurfing.com"? Great way to meet new friends and stay places for free!
    Have you consdered running some kind of ad on Honolulu.Craigslist.Org looking for travel partners to help defray the costs?

    Most importantly plan sufficiently enough so that you have some sort of thread for your trip, but don't plan so rigorously that you miss out on the serendipity of discovering paradise.

    Oh, and the best Aloha shirts to bring back as souvenirs? Forget Hilo Hattie, Kahala, Reyns, Tori Richards, and any of the other cheap or department store brands. Seek out “Manuheali'i”. This is true Aloha wear made by Native Hawaiians. It distinguishes the outsiders from the “kama'aina”.

    Please feel free to contact me if you have further questions. Aloha and Be Well! Alan


  • conquer

    Posts: 305

    May 01, 2010 2:56 PM GMT
    thanks for all the info, def planning on taking it easy and enjoying all the sights. sounds like the big island is a must, i'll make sure to put it on the top of the list
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    May 01, 2010 3:21 PM GMT
    There are plenty of hostels, got check Hostelworld.com for listings and costs.

    I was there last month and stayed at the Seaside Hawaiian Hostel in waikiki and used that as my base for exploring Oahu.. the dorm room was $22 a night and it wasn't dodgy in the least LOL

    There actually happened to be 2 gay bars right next door if you need a drink icon_biggrin.gif

    Have fun!
  • conquer

    Posts: 305

    May 02, 2010 4:28 AM GMT
    thanks for that, i was looking at the seaside and wondering what it was like. been doing some research, and travelers always have extra tips
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    May 02, 2010 4:33 AM GMT
    GAMRican said
    sublstyley saidyeah give my number out to all the hot locals ;).

    im going to be there in may, heard theres some amazing hiking trails!


    It's the "off trail" paths to secluded and sometimes breathtaking spots that really make the hiking experience orgasmic.



    theres one called stairway to heaven?
    a friend of mine would always talk about wanting to go there but its closed off or something of the like?
  • conquer

    Posts: 305

    May 02, 2010 5:01 AM GMT
    do you know where the "stairway" is?
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    May 02, 2010 5:39 AM GMT
    sublstyley said
    GAMRican said
    sublstyley saidyeah give my number out to all the hot locals ;).
    im going to be there in may, heard theres some amazing hiking trails!

    It's the "off trail" paths to secluded and sometimes breathtaking spots that really make the hiking experience orgasmic.


    theres one called stairway to heaven?
    a friend of mine would always talk about wanting to go there but its closed off or something of the like?


    "Stairway to Heaven" (aka "The Haiku Stairs") is officially closed due to issues concerning safety, property easements, and parking issues. The stairs themselves received extensive repair before the land and the stairs were turned over from the DoD to the State of Hawaii.

    Unfortunately, the stairs themselves are about 18 inches wide and do not allow for the safe passage of two people without one person actually hanging off the rail on the unprotected side of the rail. This wouldn't be so bad if it weren't a possible near vertical fall of over two thousand feet. Combine this with the possibility of extreme and unpredictable changes in wind and microclimate, and the potential to have a really bad day is exacerbated making this hike a "Stairway to Heaven" in a very permanent way.

    Still, folks ignore the signs, jump the fence, cope with the pine tar coated barbed wire that the area residents have strung, and skirt the occasional security guard to do the hike.

    The trail is a steep ridgeline hike, and not for the novice, not for those who are out of shape, and certainly not for those who dislike heights or get vertigo. Gym gloves are suggested for those who do make the hike, both for better grip going up, being able to take several stairs on a stride going down, and avoiding those beastly callouses on the hands which make beating off that much less pleasurable.

    The local residents near the trail head despise hikers due to the lack off common sense respect for residents' peace, quiet, and property. Parking near the trail head is also sparse.

    So, overall there are a combination of issues regarding the access to, and use of the trail that appear to have no easy solution that could allow the State of Hawaii to open trail to the public.

    More information at: http://friendsofhaikustairs.org/