Opinions from SERIOUS "GEAR-HEADS"!

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    May 01, 2010 3:33 AM GMT
    Power washing your car engine...do it or not and do it yourself or let a detail shop do it...if you do it yourself words of wisdom on what and how to do it.....any products to use or avoid (GUNK?)....engine running or not? Does it help or is it a waste of time and money? Thanks...icon_biggrin.gif
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    May 01, 2010 3:36 AM GMT
    Sporty_g saidPower washing your car engine...do it or not and do it yourself or let a detail shop do it...if you do it yourself words of wisdom on what and how to do it.....any products to use or avoid (GUNK?)....engine running or not? Does it help or is it a waste of time and money? Thanks...icon_biggrin.gif


    I use Gunk and a power hose at the car wash....I cover anything like a carb/ fuel injector..., distributor or electrical that can get wet and the go at it
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    May 01, 2010 4:52 AM GMT
    You can also steam clean.

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    May 01, 2010 3:01 PM GMT
    If it had fuel injection, with all rubber gaskets I wouldn't have an issue. If your engine is sealed with cork gaskets, or you have a carb, I would just get in there with some elbow grease to avoid weakening any seals.

    I used to clean my Nova's 307 with a toothbrush. lmao With a good grease cutter and some polishing rags for the chrome parts, power washing wasn't really necessary.
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    May 01, 2010 4:15 PM GMT
    High-pressure washing of an engine should only be done by someone who has the knowledge. In Ohio you may have self-serve car wash bays, with the spray wand & hose, that have special settings for engine cleaning.

    A selector lets you choose an engine degreaser that sprays at a safe low pressure, and then a low-pressure rinse. If there's no low-pressure rinse option, then hold the spray wand about 5 feet from the engine. Avoid spraying directly on the hot exhaust manifold. Then close the hood and wash the car exterior, to remove any degreaser overspray & splash that could damage the paint.

    Among engine compartment components that are susceptible to damage from high-pressure water or steam are the alternator, electric radiator fan, idler pulley bearings for the serpentine drive belt, air filter if water is forced up the air intake housing, fuse boxes (when mounted in the engine compartment), dipsticks for engine oil & transmission fluid, wire loom connectors at the firewall and elsewhere, and battery.

    Engine compartment cleaning is mostly cosmetic and normally does not impart any functional advantages to the car's operation. Exceptions are when oil or coolant leaks allow heavy gunk to develop over time, sometimes even becoming a fire hazard, and when an oil leak causes smoke & odors as the engine heats. A clean (but not necessarily spotlessly shiny) engine also makes it easier to detect & trace leaks when they first occur.