High Triglycerides

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 6:52 PM GMT
    I had blood work done a month ago (beginning of April) which indicated that i had slightly high overall cholesterol. However, my Triglycerides where very high (in the 700s) and I also had elevated liver enzymes. since then I've been dieting and working out.

    I saw my doctor today and he was really no help. I tried to switch doctors but when i got there my new doctor wasn't there so I had to go visit with my old (terrible) doctor. before my blood work I had a horrible diet of fast food and lots of alcohol. (it was a bad time in my life) and I've been on a diet and fitness plan for about a month and a half and I've lost 15 pounds already. i do cardio 6 times a week and lift 4 times a week.

    My doctor gave me 2 alternatives, i could take the medicine for the triglycerides and high blood pressure but it may hurt my liver even more. OR I can continue with my diet and exercise and in 2 months get blood work again and see how it goes.

    I would like to just diet and exercise and hopefully my levels will start to go down, but i don't know what the risk is of walking around with very high triglycerides. Has anyone been through this? Does anyone have any advice on other ways to lower triglyceride levels? thanks.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 7:07 PM GMT
    You are only 22 years old. Why are you facing these issues? I don't go on a bender each time I run into a rough spot in my life. If I can do it, so can you.

    Stop making excuses, and learn to take better care of yourself, young man.

  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 7:20 PM GMT
    Carbohydrates are what drive up triglycerides (as well as make the LDL small and dense, which is the undesirable form of LDL), so the best dietary approach to high triglycerides will be a low-carb diet.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 7:24 PM GMT
    MuchMoreThanMuscle saidMore asshole spewing from Reppa....god...I can't believe you...you contribute nothing to the posts other than whiny bitchy garbage..



    Waxon, I don't know what your diet is like but sugary foods and refined carbohydrates can have a lot to do with high triglycerides. Since I am very good about my diet my doctors say that my triglycerides are very low. That's because I don't eat white bread, I don't eat sugary foods. I do eat a lot of fruit and vegetables but these foods don't contribute to high triglycerides.

    Congratulations on your progress thus far. I think you should try to consult with a very well educated nutritionist who can address your specific needs.


    Just curious as to why your liver enzymes are elevated if you're not drinking any longer. You're so young. Try your hardest to get this under control without the medications that may compromise your liver any further. And NO more drinking..just let that be a bygone.


    My liver enzymes are heightened on the blood test because i stopped drinking after i got my results back (beginning of April). The Doctor said the liver enzymes can be heightened because of alcohol and because of my weight (Fatty liver) . But he felt where my liver is and said it wasn't inflamed or anything which is good cuz that would mean that it was something else.

    It's actually really sad because my whole family is overweight and my mom always gets fast food and i told her to stop and she was laughing when i gave her my results and she just really didn't care so it resulted to a fight and to us not talking right now icon_sad.gif
  • EricLA

    Posts: 3461

    May 05, 2010 8:03 PM GMT
    I recently posted about my cholesterol results and was the first to say that genetics plays a part. Obviously, if your family all struggle with weight there's a genetic factor at work and/or they've had bad models for their diet.

    I'm not a doctor, but I can't imagine trying to lower your LDL over two months before trying the pharmaceutical route would be a bad thing. You've obviously received your wake-up call and trying to make a positive change. You're making a dent. Keep it up, even if progress is slow.

    I keep my cholesterol low by eating primarily chicken (cooked with its skin to keep it juicy, but removed after cooking) or ground turkey. I usually stir fry the ground turkey (in just a table spoon of olive oil) and add to pasta sauce. I don't have a ton of noodles, but you should also switch to whole wheat pasta. I try to avoid white rice, and use brown rice instead -- again, not a large serving. I try not to have a ton of bread. I try to have a salad and/or a vegetable with lunch and dinner. Apples are good snacks during the day, as are unsalted raw almonds (thank you Trader Joes).

    But, if you're used to eating a lot of bad food, this transition might be difficult. If you want to succeed, I don't think you can entirely eliminate the foods you've been used to eating. Allow yourself one bad snack a day. Allow a fast food meal for lunch -- within reason, e.g. don't "Supersize" -- on a Sunday. But the more you stick to a healthy diet and consistent exercise, the sooner you'll realize your goals. And if you miss a session or two a week, don't beat yourself up, but get right back at it and work as hard as you can to make working out a consistent part of your life.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 8:29 PM GMT
    stop your drinking!

    1. fish oil with omega-3 fatty acids, 2000mg with breakfast, 2000mg with dinner
    2. sustained-release (time released) niacin, from 500mg to 2000mg at bedtime, depending on your tolerance for the 'flushing' it might cause

    your liver enzymes may remain elevated or become more so if you take the above meds and don't stop drinking. you should also get an interaction check between any meds you currrently take regularly and the above two.

    - lose weight
    - watch your diet
    - increase your cardiovascular exercise, minimum 3-4 times a week, sustained heart rate >120 for at least 30-40 minutes.

    be religious about it. talk to your doctor about it.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 8:52 PM GMT
    I had over an over 700 reading four years ago after a summer working at camp. The doc gave me meds and I took them until the bottle emptied. The following tests all showed up much much better.

    When I refused to refill, the office was pissed with me, but later tests came back to show it wasn't the meds doing all the work. For me it was the diet...camp had shitty food (and has since become much healthier!) whereas when I ate at college, I had a good diet and exercise routine.

    The guys above have some wonderful ideas on food. However, the best advice I can offer is to cook your own food. When we tackle this simple step, we take a lot of control over what goes in our body and how it affects our health. Good luck and let us know how it goes!
  • mtneerman

    Posts: 476

    May 05, 2010 8:58 PM GMT
    write down dietary and exercise goals for 3 months from now and fill in weekly what you have to do in order to reach them. keep them realistic or it will lead to dissapointmet, but don't be too easy on yourself either. don't set weight goals or LDL goals, if you keep your exercise and diet goals the rest will take care of itself. it's not easy. good luck.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 10:11 PM GMT
    Hey Waxon;
    I'm a Sports Medicine physician. What area are you located at?
    Many people have the misconception that any physician will be able to treat anything. Sports Physicians focus not only on sports injuries, but primarily on performance, dietary changes, and building muscle mass. We essentially 'create an athlete'.
    The first thing you have to think is most definitely there's a genetic trend in your background. If this is the case, and your triglycerides are certainly much higher than 300, a medication MAY be temporarily used to help you achieve the desired levels. Once there, it may be easier to keep them in control. So, a meication isn't always bad.
    Second, alcohol has to stop. It not only induces fatty liver(which cannot be detected by palpation, much like liver inflammation can't be detected on palpation guys), but it increases fat accumulation and impairs your overall performance significantly. Serious athletes don't drink at all.
    Third, change your carbohydrates. Don't eliminate them!! If you go into Atkins diet you can do more damage than good. Use brown rice, wheat bread.
    Fourth, see a sports medicine physician. He'll help you determine how much cardio, and how frequent, will be good for you. What works for some of us may not work others.
    Fifth. Please, bring those labs to your sports physician. If they're 6 months old they're little use. You may need to have TSH also included.
    Sixth. Do not move away from your moms place. Who knows, you may be able to help her understand and get back in line with her own health.

    This is not intended as a formal medical consult, but rather as recommendations from an expert who's not treating you.

    Wish you the best.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 05, 2010 10:33 PM GMT
    See a nutricionist. Secret is in cutting off sugar (and carbo has a lot of it!), you probably get a high protein diet, no sweets whatsoever, carbo all the way to 4 pm and then none....good news is that it works! Again, see a nutricionist.
  • dhfish

    Posts: 4

    May 05, 2010 10:35 PM GMT
    I'm actually a pharmaceutical rep and sell drugs for cholesterol so this is my area of knowledge.

    As far as why your triglycerides go they are elevated probably for 2 reasons: high carbohydrate diet ie: pastas breads etc and you guessed it alcohol.

    I would suggest cleaning up your diet and no binge drinking no more than 3 drinks per day. So no weekend partying out of control. Switch your diet around so you have lean protiens and little carbs. You need carbs but not breads and pastas. I would suggest sweet potatoes and yams as an option. Give this 3 weeks and go get a blood test again. Prior to going don't have anything to eat or drink 12hrs prior to the test or this could elevate it.

    Continue on your excersice plan and incorporate areobic. As far as you liver enzymes go this could also be due to wieght lifting and execise in general so do not do any excersice 24 hrs to your test as well. Also don't over do the protien supplements if you are doing it as they can also effect them as well.

    Let me know how it works out. Good luck! If your TG's are still high your doctor might suggest going on a fibrate drug or a statin. Don't be afraid they will help more than they will hurt.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 06, 2010 6:48 AM GMT
    I'm afraid there's a bit of bad advice here. Statins are bad, bad, bad, on your liver and my doctor throws them in the trash.

    "The bottom line is carbohydrates aren’t all good or all bad. Some carbohydrates promote health while others increase the risk for high cholesterol, diabetes and heart disease. Here are a few suggestions on how to add appropriate nutrient dense carbohydrates to the daily diet. Whole wheat bread, grains, brown rice, beans and whole wheat pasta are carbohydrates that also have vitamins and minerals. Eating fresh fruits and vegetables will also add nutrient dense carbohydrates to the diet. Foods such as white flour, white potatoes, cookies, cakes and sugars are carbohydrates that offer very little nutrition and should be avoided. Most experts agree that carbs are a part of a healthy diet."

    Carbs are only bad if they lead to obesity (i.e. obesity is bad in general).

    "Carbohydrates are processed by the body and changed to blood glucose. The blood glucose is absorbed into the blood stream and then used for energy, especially in the brain and nervous system. If there is extra blood glucose that is not used for energy, the body converts the glucose into triglycerides. The triglycerides (also known as fat) are then stored in the fatty tissues for a rainy day. Stored triglycerides are what causes weight gain and can increase cholesterol. Individuals with high triglycerides often have a high level of LDL (bad) and lower levels of HDL (good) cholesterol. Individuals with high levels of triglycerides are at risk for high cholesterol, diabetes and heart disease."

    Main thing: eat small meals often, with a BALANCED diet. Too much sugar, to much fat, and too much sodium are BAD.

    If you exercise, and eat right, chances are you wont' need meds. Also, note that niacin (nicotinic acid) has been proven in numerous university studies to be as good at bettering your cholesterol number as statins which carry a number of nasty side effects.

    Just yesterday, I spoke with a gal who works at the deli counter at Albertson's here. She walked away from her bp meds, and type 2 diabetes...BY WALKING, and changing her diet.

    EXERCISE. Don't eat sugary, nor fried foods. Watch the salt. Eat small meals often.

    Since you're in Texas, let me say one more time: Ditch the fried foods. Ditch the sugar. Ditch the salt. Lower the portion size. Eat more often. EXERCISE.

    A touch of alcohol can be good for you, but, too much, too often, bounces around your ADH, and DH (which bounces your blood pressure around, and leaves you dehyrated or bloated), and negatively affects your liver function. Easy on the booze.

    Did I say exercise?

    All that being said, some folks have shitty genetics. If that's you, you may need all of the above, plus meds, and MORE EXERCISE.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 06, 2010 9:46 PM GMT
    A slight correction.
    Statins are not bad. They CAN be bad for your liver. There's no way to say if it will affect yours particularly until you try them. Then again, in sports medicine we don't jump into medications unless it is absolutely necessary.
    Tylenol is just as bad, but yet people take it without thinking twice.
    All in all, try just changing your habits.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 06, 2010 10:09 PM GMT
    waxon said...
    It's actually really sad because my whole family is overweight and my mom always gets fast food and i told her to stop and she was laughing when i gave her my results and she just really didn't care so it resulted to a fight and to us not talking right now icon_sad.gif
    Welcome to my previous world. I've left Christmas and Thanksgiving dinners to go eat "healthy" food at a restaurant to avoid eating the artery-clogging goodness that was cooked for the fatass family. Now I don't even go "home" (cringe at calling it that) for the holidays.

    Sounds like you need to move. As long as your entire family and friends of the family are encouraging you do be unhealthy, it will make it almost impossible to reach your goals. You need to be surrounded by others who live a healthier lifestyle. Your family may never understand...mine still doesn't...but at least living away from them (1400 miles away in my case) makes being healthy MUCH easier.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 07, 2010 11:22 PM GMT
    vanderhagast saidA slight correction.
    Statins are not bad. They CAN be bad for your liver. There's no way to say if it will affect yours particularly until you try them. Then again, in sports medicine we don't jump into medications unless it is absolutely necessary.
    Tylenol is just as bad, but yet people take it without thinking twice.
    All in all, try just changing your habits.


    Yep, if laws and medicine made sense, we wouldn't have our current drug policy, but, neither does.

    As hepatoxic as some meds are you'd think they'd never get approved, but, they do.
  • Posted by a hidden member.
    Log in to view his profile

    May 07, 2010 11:24 PM GMT
    Noting the young man is in Texas, know that Texans are among the least healthy folks in the world. Too much of too much has lead them there.

    It was announced just today that Dallas is the fourth fattest city in The World, moving UP from number 6 last year. Dallas has long been the stroke capital of The World, and...Dallas county has the highest HIV infection rate in Texas. Folks here are completely selfish and self-indulgent, irresponsible, and reckless when it comes to their personal health, and, I might add, lazy, as many Texans are.