Should Women Live In Fear Of Male Athletes?

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    May 08, 2010 8:57 PM GMT
    An interesting discussion, and does it apply to gays, or just straight athletes?

    http://nbcsports.msnbc.com/id/37036218/ns/sports-washington_post/
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    May 08, 2010 9:13 PM GMT
    No one should live in fear of any one else.
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    May 09, 2010 12:42 AM GMT
    I think it applies to athletes in general. The dominating hubris that athletes may adopt, I feel, fuels some of this behaviour. Then again, who's to say that athletes GENERALLY associate with this type of behaviour?

    Definitely an interesting and thought-provoking article.
  • Artesin

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    May 09, 2010 12:51 AM GMT
    It's just that macho, over the top, "Im better than you", pompous attitude that they employ. Don't have to be an athlete to act that way.
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    May 09, 2010 1:00 AM GMT
    There are approx 4,000 athletes in the NHL,NBA,NFL and MLB. A few bad apples does not represent pro athletes. What a silly oversensitive dyke looking author of this story.
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    May 09, 2010 1:27 AM GMT
    Artesin saidIt's just that macho, over the top, "Im better than you", pompous attitude that they employ. Don't have to be an athlete to act that way.


    No just go to a lesbian bar, and you will see they are a dime a dozen, and why should regular women feel threatend by them too?
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    May 09, 2010 7:59 AM GMT
    I'm sick of reading articles in papers or online. Journalists are all trying to find a way to spend their time and get paid.

    This article is just stupid, plain and simple. To focus strictly on male athletes due to highly publicized incidences (and, mind you, some of which are strictly ACCUSATIONS) is just irresponsible. It fires me up to no end. Thank goodness a good number of readers recognize that.

    She uses Roethlisberger as an example. Well, he was partying it up just like his so-called victim was. He was drunk and acting like a drunk. So was she. On top of that, SHE WAS UNDERAGE but certainly old enough to make right-and-wrong decisions and shouldn't have been in any bar to begin with. And Lawrence Taylor? The prostitute was also UNDERAGE, but certainly old enough to make right-and-wrong decisions. Hmmmm....maybe male athletes should be afraid of THESE WOMEN! As far as Huguely, the problem isn't that he was an athlete but he clearly has psychological issues as evidenced by his past record.

    That being said, to refute the article and point out one of it's many flaws, sure, athletes get in trouble. But, let's focus back on the thousands of rapists, murderers, thieves, assaulters, etc. that live next door to us and don't have million-dollar salaries. THEY'RE the ones SOCIETY should be afraid of.

    This writer is just using the media attention of these athletes to gain attention to her article. Stupid. She should be sued for inadvertently slandering the thousands of GOOD MALE ATHLETES that work hard every day and treat people with respect.
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    May 09, 2010 11:54 AM GMT
    EastCoastNAZ said...This writer is just using the media attention of these athletes to gain attention to her article. Stupid. She should be sued for inadvertently slandering the thousands of GOOD MALE ATHLETES that work hard every day and treat people with respect.

    She mostly quotes a MALE author about sport in society:

    "We can no longer dismiss these actions as representative of a few bad apples," says Jay Coakley, author of "Sport in Society: Issues and Controversies," and a professor of sociology at the University of Colorado. "The evidence suggests that they are connected to particular group cultures that are in need of critical assessment."

    She also asks the question whether these thousands of other male athletes really are so good themselves, if they ignore and even enable their teammates to assault and victimize women.

    Men are the only ones who can change it — by taking responsibility for their locker room culture, and the behavior and language of their teammates. Nothing will change until the biggest stars in the clubhouse are mortally offended, until their grief and remorse over an assault trumps their solidarity.
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    May 09, 2010 5:26 PM GMT
    By quoting it, she's agreeing with it. I don't care what gender wrote the article.

    And her questioning the motives of all the other "good" athletes is reinforcing my point about her inadvertently slandering them. Alot of assumptions she is making about locker room talk and behavior and its impact. Just because the lacrosse team doens't want to talk about the heinous murder or the accused murderer does not mean they are condoning what he did. There are serious legal implications to one of their friends involved. He has already admitted to striking her, taking her computer, and being very angry with her. What more is there to say. Let's not forget that the murder victim was also their friend and they, too, are still grieving.

    Rape and murder of the kind that seemed to have inspired the article aren't a result of locker room banter. It's a mental illness that is unique to the individual. If her assumptions were true, then there would many more male athletes on trial or in jail. The author makes it sound like the team was there chanting and cheering while the accused were murdering and raping.

    I'll say it again. Stupid.





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    May 09, 2010 5:44 PM GMT
    I just think its wrong for her to assume the whole team is in on it. There might just be a few individuals who really know whats going on. Any sports team is too big for every player to know whats going on in everyone else's life.

    Added:
    Also, I take issue with her last paragraph.
    [quote][cite]The truth is, women can't do anything about this problem. Men are the only ones who can change it — by taking responsibility for their locker room culture, and the behavior and language of their teammates. Nothing will change until the biggest stars in the clubhouse are mortally offended, until their grief and remorse over an assault trumps their solidarity.[/quote]

    She puts women in a helpless position. Really? In soberer conditions, it isn't hard to tell how a guy treats a girl. Sometimes the guy can be deceiving. But women can just reject and ignore guys who treat them badly thinking its a joke.